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Full text of "1958 Census of Mineral Industries. Area Statistics. V. 2"

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REFERENCE COPY 



UNITED STATES CENSUS OF MINERAL INDUSTRIES: 1958 



VOL II 


AREA STATISTICS 




Industry Statistics for Geographic Divisions, 


- 


States, and Counties 




Prepared under the supervision of 
MAXWELL R. CONKLIN 




Chief, Industry Division 
iii"r^nnAr»TiirkiT^Nr/"/^iiiirn/~r 




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
Luther H. Hodges, Secretary 

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 

Richard M. Scannmon, Director (From May I, 1961, 
Robert W. Burgess, Director (To March 3, 1961) 



Bureau of the Census 
Library 




U.S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 

BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 

Richard M. Scaminon, Director 

A. Ross ECKLER, Deputy Director 
Howard C. Grieves, Assistant Director 
Conrad Taeuber, Assistant Director 

Herman P. Miller, Special Assistant 

Glen S. Taylor, Special Assistant 
Morris H. Hansen, Assistant Director for Research and Development 

Joseph F. Daly, Chief Mathematical Statistician 

Julius Shiskin, Chief Economics Statistician 
Charles B. Lawrence, Jr., Assistant Director for Operations 

C F. Van Aken, Special Assistant 
Walter L. Kehres, Assistant Director for Administration 
Calvert L. Dedrick, Chief, International Statistical Programs Office 
A. W. VON Struve, Pablic Information Officer 

Industry Division — Maxwell R. Conklin, Chief 

Owen C. Gretton, Assistant Chief, Program Development 
Jack L. Ogus, Assistant Chief, Research and Methodology 
Louis J. Owen, Assistant Chief, Production and Process Statistics 
Vivian Eberele Spencer, Chief, Minerals 

Economic Operations Division — M. D. Bingham, Chief 
Irving Weiss, Assistant Chief, Processing 
Sol Dolleck, Assistant Chief, Systems 

Administrative Service Division — Everett H. Burke, Chief 

Agriculture Division — Ray Hurley, Chief 

Budget and Management Division — Charles H. Alexander, Chief 

Business Division — Harvey Kailin, Chief 

Construction Statistics Division — Samuel J. Dennis, Chief 

Data Processing Systems Division — Robert F. Drury, Chief 

Decennial Operations Division — Morton A. Meyer, Chief 

Demographic Surveys Division — Robert B. Pearl, Chief 

Field Division — Jefferson D. McPike, Chief 

Foreign Trade Division — J. Edward Ely, Chief 

Geography Division — William T. Fay, Chief 

Governments Division — Joseph F. Arbena, Acting Chief 

Housing Division — Daniel B. Rathbun, Chief 

Personnel Division — James P. Taff, Chief 

Population Division — Howard G. Brunsman, Chief 

Statistical Methods Division — Joseph Steinberg, Chief 

Statistical Reports Division — Edwin D. Goldfield, Chief 

Statistical Research Division — William N. Hurwitz, Chief 

Transportation Division — E>onald E. Church, Chief 

Library of Congress Card No. A61-9403 
This volume comprises the Area Reports, Series MIC58(2), of the 1958 Census of Mineral Industries. 



SUGGESTED CITATION 

U.S. Bureau of the Census. U.S. Census of Mineral Industries: 1958 

Vol. II, Area Statistics 

U.S. Government Printing OfSce, Washington, D.C., 1961 



For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office, Washington 25, D.C., 
or any of the Field Offices of the Department of Commerce. Price $5.50 



PREFACE 

Tins is OIK- of two \-olunu's [jrcstMitiuK tiiinl results ol" the IDfiS CtMisus of Mincial Iiuliist lics. As for earlier cciisuscs, Die iU!iH 
coustis was a lurgo-scale undertaking wliifli tle])eiulc(l upon significant eontrihutions from numerous |)nt)lic and private orKanizations 
and individuals. Basic to the census was the excellent cooix'ration of n(>arly ;i5, ()()() niiniiifj companies in completing tiie ai)pro|)riat« 
report forms. .\lso important to the conduct of the lOSS Census of Mineral Industries was the cooperation of the Bureau of Old-Age, 
Survivors, and Disability Insurance and the Internal Revenue Service in permitting use of certain records, thus making possible a material 
rt^duction in the cost of conducting tlu> census. 

The advice of trade associations, indi\idual mining companies, the Bureau of Mines and other Government agencies, and research 
and marketing organizations was most valuable in determining the content of the reports and in developing technique.s for minimizing 
the burden of reporting. Also noteworthy was the assistance of the Advisory Council on Federal Reports, which through special i)anels 
of industry experts advised on the feasibility of collecting \-arious typ(>s of data. Timely publicity was given to the census by Chambers 
of Commerce, the National Association of Manufacturers and other business groups, trade ])ai)(>rs, local newspapers, and television and 
radio stations. 

The Bureau of Mines cooperated with the Bureau of the Census in conducting the 1958 Census of Mineral Industries. The Censu.s 
Bureau is particularly indebted to the Bureau of Mines, Office of Chi(>f Statistician and Office of Chief Economist for their staff work in 
planning and conducting the census. Very valuable assistance and cooperation was provided by the Chiefs, Divisions of Anthracite, 
Bituminous Coal, Minerals, and Petroleum; and the Divisions of Mineral Resources in the field oflfices. 

The 1958 Census of Mineral Industries was conducted under the direction of Maxwell R. Conklin, Chief, and Owen C. Gnitton, 
Assistant Chief, and Vivian Eberle Spencer, Chief of Minerals, of the Industry Division. Within the Industry Division this responsibility 
was shared along industry lines by the following individuals: William Cooper, Metal Mining; Wilhelmina F. Whiting, Coal Mining; C. 
H. Wallace Sedgewick, Oil and Gas Extraction; and George R. Hopkins, Nonmetallic Minerals, Except Fuels, Mining. The names of 
supporting statisticians in these commodity areas that made significant contributions are shown in the introductory portion of the 18 
industry reports which were published sejjarately prior to their assembly into the Summary and Industry Volume. 

Within the staff areas of the Industry Division, Irving Rottenberg was responsible for the concepts and definitions of establishment- 
type data and for computer specifications for editing and tabulating the Minerals Census data. Jack J. Gottsegen developed the criteria 
for selecting commodity and material items in the output and input inquiries and for the standards for processing these data. Jack L. 
Ogus was responsible for the statistical methods and sampling used in the census. The application of the system of the industrial classifi- 
cation of establishments was coordinated by Irvin Strauss in the later stages of the census and by Isidore Bogdanoff during the earlier 
period. Staff coordination on various phases of the processing of the establishment-type statistics was the responsibility of Arthur W. 
Horowitz. The preparation of the final manuscript for printing was the responsibility of Angela R. Daly. 

Processing of the reports was performed in the Economic Operations Division under the supervision of Irving \\'eiss, Assistant Chief, 
Processing, assisted by Max E. Van Horn, for the Washington operations, and Charles Merzel, Donald E. Young, Wesley R. Grier, and 
Bernard M. Kinney for operations in the Census Operations Office in Jeffersonville, Indiana. Systems and procedures were developed 
under the supervision of Sol Dolleck, Assistant Chief, Systems, assisted by Samuel Schweid, for Methods Evaluation and Determination; 
Jack Margolis, for Liaison and Systems Development; Nathan Lesowitz, aided by Carl Mueller, for development and preparation of pro- 
cedures; and Jack Scharff, aided by Eugene L. Wendt, Mary H. Johnson, and Duryee Van Wagenen, for development and supervision of 
electronic computer programming. Quality control plans and procedures were developed and supervised by Herman H. Fasteau, assisted 
by George Minton, Alfred J. McKeon, and Ruth II. Mills. Scheduling, progress reporting, and related staff work were supervised by 
Wilbur J. Mathias and Margaret R. Rommel. 

In the Data Processing Systems Division, Rudolph M. Micoly and James W. Shores supervised the scheduling and operation of elec- 
tronic equipment; Edgar D. Morgan and William M. Gaines supervised equipment engineering and maintenance, and Mrs. Dorothy P. 
Armstrong supervised general-purpose computer programming activities, Joseph S. Pewterbaugh and Emil Gorgovits developed techniques 
and procedures relating to the machine tabulation phases; and Frank McGrath, assisted by Emma Gass, supervised the card punching. 

Staff members in other divisions and offices of the Bureau also contributed to the various phases of the census. Robert Klove, Assist- 
ant Chief of the Geography Division, assisted by Robert P. Condon and Alford Archer, supervised the preparation of the maps and charts. 
Robert H. Brooks, Chief, Graphics Branch, Administrative Service Division, was responsible for the prejiaration of copy for reproduction. 
Sheldon M. Klein, Chief, and Ingrid L. Millison, of the Presentation Practices Branch, Statistical Reports Division, reviewed text material 
and table forms and assisted on publication problems. Harold T. Goldstein, of the Office of the Chief Economic Statistician, was respon- 
sible for the review of manufacturing industry coding manuals and for coordinating coding concepts with those followed in the Manufac- 
tures and Business Industries fields. Robert D. Krook, Executive Officer, Census Operations Office at Jeffersonville, Indiana, was 
responsible for the phases of the processing operations performed there. 

December I9G] III 



1958 CENSUS OF MINERAL INDUSTRIES FINAL REPORT 



Volume I: SUMMARY AND INDUSTRY STATISTICS 



Summary Statistics 



Chapter 

I. General Summary 
II. Size of Establishments 
III. Tj'pe of Organization 



Chapter 

IV. Employment and Related Statistics 

V. Type of Operation 
VI. Fuels, Electric Energy, and Selected Supplies Used 

Chapters I-VI were also issued as separate reports in Series MIC(l) 



Industry Statistics 



Separate chapters for each of 14 industries or groups of 
industries. These chapters include for 55 individual 
industries, such statistics as number of establishments; 
quantity and value of shipments and receipts; capital 
expenditures; number of employees, man-hours, and pay- 
rolls; and cost of supplies, fuels, electric energy, contract 
work, and purchased machinery installed. Selected 
statistics are also shown by size of establishment, output 



per man-hour, and ratio of payroll to value added in 
mining. These statistics are shown for the United States 
by States and types of operation. Historical compari- 
sons are included. This volume also includes four major 
group summary chapters. (The industry and major 
group summary chapters were issued as separate reports 
in Series MIC58(1)-10A— MIC58(1)-14F.) 



Volume II: AREA STATISTICS 



Chapters for each State, Alaska, and Hawaii. Each 
area chapter contains such statistics as number of estab- 
lishments; quantity and value of shipments and receipts; 
capital expenditures; number of Employees, man-hours, 
and pajTolls; and cost of supplies; fuels, electric energy, 
contract work, and purchased machinery installed. 
These figures are shown by industry and by county, and 
for some industry groups within county. Number of 



establishments is shown by size of operation, industry 
group, and county. Number of establishments, number 
of employees, and value added in mining is shown by type 
of operation. Historical comparisons are included. 
Nine division summary reports are also shown and a 
General Summary report is included. (The area chap- 
ters were issued as separate reports, Series MIC58(2)-1 — 
MIC58(2)-49.) 



Volume I: Summary Statistics 
Volume II: Industry Statistics 



1958 CENSUS OF MANUFACTURES FINAL REPORTS 

Volume III: Area Statistics 



1958 CENSUS OF BUSINESS FINAL REPORTS 



Volume I: Retail Trade — Summary Statistics 
Volume II: Retail Trade — Area Statistics 
Volume III: Wholesale Trade — Summary Statistics and 
Public Warehousing 



Volume IV: Wholesale Trade — Area Statistics 

Volume V: Selected Services — Summary Statistics 

Volume VI: Selected Services — Area Statistics 

Volume VII: Central Business District Reports 



IV 



CONTENTS 



INTRODUCTION 



Page 



1. Earlier Censuses of Mineral Industries 

2. Publication of the 1958 Minerals Census Results. 

3. The Mineral Industries and Other Segments of 

the Econonny 

4. Definition of the Mineral Industries 

5. Industry Classification 

6. Establishment Statistics 

7. Coverage of the Census 

8. Census Geographic Divisions 

9. Cooperation with the Bureau of Mines 

1 0. Census Mailing List 

11. Census Report Forms 

12. Comparison of 1958 and 1954 Census Report 

Forms 

13. Establishment Location ajid Compauiy 

Characteristics 

14. Type of Operation 

15. Number of Operating Companies 

16. Persons Engaged 



1 


17 


1 


18 




19 


1 


20 


2 




3 


21 


3 


22 


4 


23 


5 


24 


5 


25 


5 




6 


26 




27 


7 


28 




29 


7 


30 


7 


31 


7 




7 


32 



Page 

Monthly and Average Employment 8 

Production and Developnnent Worker Man-Hours. . 8 

Payrolls for the Year 8 

Supplies and Related Costs, Contract Work, and 

Purchased Machinery 9 

Specific Supplies Used 9 

Minerals Prepared 9 

Capital Expenditures 9 

Individual Products 10 

Shipments, Production, Custom Milling, and 

Net Shipments 10 

Value Added in Mining 11 

Energy Used 11 

Output Per Man-Hour 12 

Ratio of Payroll to Value Added in Mining 12 

Imputation of Data 12 

Confidentiality of Data for Individual 

Companies 12 

Abbreviations 13 



Table 
1 
2 

3 

4 

5 
6 



GENERAL SUMMARY 

General Statistics for Mineral Operations in the United States: 1958 and Earlier Years 18 

Detailed Statistics for Mineral Operations in the United States, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 20 

Selected Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Divisions and States: 1958 24 

Selected Statistics for Mineral Operations in the United States, by Major Industry Group and Industry: 

1958, 1954, 1939, and 1929 28 

General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Divisions, States, Alaska, and Hawaii: 1958, 1954, and 1939.. 40 
Value of Primary and Secondary Shipments and Receipts and Value of Net Shipments in All industries, 

by Industry for the United States: 1958 50 

Quantity and Value of Mineral Products as Reported to the Bureau of the Census and to the Bureau of Mines 

for the United States, Alaska, and Hawaii: 1958 52 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 



New England 

Middle Atlantic. . . . 
East North Central. 



Page 

59 
67 
75 



Page 

West North Central 83 

South Atlantic 91 

East South Central 99 



Page 

West South Central 1 07 

Mountain 115 

Pacific 123 



Alabama 1-1 

Arizona. . . 2-1 

Arkansas 3-1 

California 4-1 

Colorado 5-1 

Connecticut 6-1 

Delaware 17-1 

District of Coltombia 17-1 

Florida 7-1 

Georgia 8-1 

Idaho 9-1 

Illinois 10-1 

Indiana 11-1 

Iowa 12-1 

Kansas 13-1 

Kentucky 14- 1 

Louisiana 15-1 



STATES 

Maine 16-1 

Maryland 17-1 

Massachusetts 18-1 

Michigan 19-1 

Minnesota 20-1 

Mississippi 21-1 

Missouri 22-1 

Montana 23-1 

Nebraska 24-1 

Nevada 25-1 

New Hampshire 26-1 

New Jersey 27-1 

New Mexico 28-1 

New York 29-1 

North Carolina 30-1 

North Dakota 31-1 

Ohio 32-1 



Oklahoma 33-1 

Oregon 34- 1 

Pennsylvania 35- 1 

Rhode Island 36-1 

South Carolina 37-1 

South Dakota 38- 1 

Tennessee 39-1 

Texas 40-1 

Utah 41-1 

Vermont 42- 1 

Virginia 43-1 

Washington 44- 1 

West Virginia 45- 1 

Wisconsin 46-1 

Wyoming 47-1 

Alaska 48- 1 

Hawaii 49-1 



MAPS, CHARTS, AND APPENDIX 



Maps: Mining Employment in the United States by County: 1958 VI 

Regions and Geographic Divisions of the United States 58 

State Maps - See individual State Reports. 

Charts: Mining Employment in the United States: 1860-1958 17 

Geographic Division and State Charts - See individual Geographic Division and State Reports. 

Appendix A: Provisions of Law Relating to Census of Mineral Industries A- 1 



The pages of each report were numbered independently; page numbers of State reports consist 
of two parts, the first part being a State designation numbered in alphabetic order of the States. 
Thus, page 1-1 is page 1 of the report for the State of Alabama; page 47-12 is the last page of 
the report for the State of Wyoming (MIC 58(2) -47). 



Revisions of data previously published in the corresponding pages of Mineral 
Industries Area Statistics Final Reports Series MIC58(2) are indicated by a 
symbol "r. " 



>- 



• •s 



/■ 



>•••: 



t^ 



UJ 

X 


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• • . . • 

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i {'m 



Introduction 



CONTENTS 

1. Earlier Censuses of Mineral Industries 

2. Publication of the 1958 minerals census results 

3. The mineral industries and other segments of the econ- 

omy 

4. Definition of the mineral industries 

5. Industry classification 

6. Establishment statistics 

7. Coverage of the Census 

8. Census geographic divisions 

9. Cooperation with the Bureau of Mines 

10. Census mailing list 

11. Census report forms 

12. Comparison of 1958 and 1954 Census report forms 

13. Establishment location and company characteristics 

14. Type of operation 

15. Number of operating companies 

16. Persons engaged 

17. Monthly and average employment 

18. Production and development worker man-hours 

19. Payrolls for the year 

20. Supplies and related costs, contract work, and pur- 

chased machinery 

21. Specific supplies used 

22. Minerals prepared 

23. Capital expenditures 

24. Individual products 

25. Shipments, production, custom milling, and net ship- 

ments 

26. Value added in mining 

27. Energy used 

28. Output per man-hour 

29. Ratio of payroll to value added in mining 

30. Imputation of data 

31. Confidentiality of data for individual companies 

32. Abbreviations 



1. Earlier Censuses of Mineral Industries 

The 1958 Census of Mineral Industries is the fourteenth 
such census of the United States. The first minerals cen- 
sus covered the year 1840. Such censuses have been con- 
ducted for the intervening years: 1850, 1860, 1870, 1880, 
1889, 1902, 1909, 1919, 1929, 1935, 1939, and 1954. Present 
legislation provides for a Census of Mineral Industries to 
cover the year 1963 and every fifth year thereafter. 

The scope and quality of the minerals censuses have 
varied. While many of the problems and concepts involved 
in such a census were recognized early, the difficulties of 
locating mineral operators and the meager records often 
maintained impaired the quality of the first few censuses. 
Beginning with 1880, however, fairly comparable statistics 
have been available. The most comprehensive previous 
censuses are those covering the years 1880, 1889, 1902, 
1909, 1919, 1939, and 1954. 

The 1958 minerals census was conducted jointly with 
the Censuses of Manufactures and Business (Wholesale, 
Retail, and Services). All of these censuses covered the 
continental United States, Alaska, and Hawaii. The United 
States total figures in this report do not include establish- 



ments in Alaska and Hawaii, which did not achieve State- 
hood until 1959. Separate statistics for Alaska and Hawaii 
are included in the pertinent industry reports and separate 
chapters on Alaska and Hawaii are included in the Area 
Statistics Volume. 

For 1958 as in previous years, most of the basic in- 
quiries were common to the Censuses of Mineral Indus- 
tries and Manufactures. The statistics published for min- 
eral industries are generally comparable with those pub- 
lished for manufacturing industries, although in somewhat 
greater detail. 

2. Publi ca tion of the 1958 Minerals Census Results 

The 1958 Census of Mineral Industries final results are 
published in two volumes: Volume I, General Summary and 
Industry Statistics , shows comparative summary statistics 
for industries and States for such measures for mining 
establishments as employment; payrolls; capital expend- 
itures; value of shipments; value added in mining; minerals 
received for preparation; supplies, fuels, and electric en- 
ergy; cost of contract work; and cost of purchased machin- 
ery installed. Selected industry statistics are shown by 
size of establishment and by type of operation. Separate 
reports containing detailed industry figures are included 
for 20 groups of industries and summary reports for 4 
broad industry groups. Volume II, Area Statistics , shows 
for each State, and for major mining industries within the 
State, such statistics as indicated above, and less detailed 
figures for counties. A listing of number of establishments 
in each of 22 mineral industry groups for broad size 
classes by county is also included for each State. 



3. The Mineral Industries and Other Segments of the Econ- 
omy 



The mineral industries in recent years have accounted 
for less than 2 percent of national income and have re- 
quired employment of less than 2 percent of all gainful 
workers in the United States. Nevertheless, the mineral 
industries furnish an increasing proportion of the raw 
materials base of the economy. In 1957, the mining 
industries supplied 34 percent of all raw materials 
produced; agricultural materials, 59 percent; forest prod- 
ucts, 6 percent; and fishery and wildlife products, 1 per- 
cent. This may be compared with averages for the first 
decade of this century when mineral products accounted 
for only 17 percent of all raw materials, '."able A com- 
pares such figures for three periods in the last half 
century. 

Production of minerals in the United States requires 
a relatively much greater expenditure of capital and 
equipment than is needed for the manufacturing indus- 
tries. Although value added in mining in 1958 amounted 
to less than 9 percent of total value added for mining 
and manufacturing combined, capital expenditures in the 
mineral industries were 22 percent of the total for min- 
ing and manufacturing, and in 1954 (the most recent year 
for which such statistics are available) horsepower of 



INTRODUCTION 



TABLE A. —PERCENTAGE DISTRIBUTION OF RAW MATERIALS 
PRODUCTION FOR SELECTED PERIODS: 1900-1957 



Raw materials group 



All raw materials. 



Minerals , 

Agricultural materials... 

Forest products 

Fishery and wildlife 
products 



1900-1909 
average 



100 

17 
66 
15 



1920-1929 
average 



100 

26 
62 
10 



1950-1957 
average 



100 

33 

60 
6 



Source: U. S. Bureau of the Census. Raw Materials in 
the United States Economy: 1900-1957 (Working Paper No. 6 
to be published in 1962) . 



power equipment, excluding highway -type equipment, 21 
percent of the total. (See table B.) The crude petro- 
leum and natural gas extraction industries accounted for 
17 percent of these capital expenditures. (In comparing 
figures in table B, it should be noted that value added in 
mining includes a measure of value added in the devel- 
opment of mineral properties, see section 26, and capital 
expenditures include expenditures for development of 
mineral properties, see section 23.) 



4. Definition of the Mineral Industries 

The minerals census covers all establishments clas- 
sified in Division B — Mining, according to the 1957 re- 



TABLE B.— VALUE ADDED, EMPLOYMENT, AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURES: 1958; AND HORSEPOWER 
OF EQUIPMENT: 195-^; IN MINERAL AND MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES 



Item 



Mineral industries 



All 



Oil and gas 

•extraction 

only 



Manufacturing 
industries 



Mineral industries 

as percent of mineral 

and manufacturing 

industries 



All 
mining 



Oil and gas 
extraction 

only 



Value added (1958) $1,000,000. 

Capital expenditures (1958) do. 

Employment (1958) 1,000. 

Horsepower of power equipment : 

Including highway-type (1954.) do. 

Excluding highway-type (1954) do. 



13,381 

2,798 

733 

A0,711 
29,351 



9,035 

2,190 

313 

20,101 
12,939 



Ul,270 
10,094 
15,996 

(NA) 
108,362 



8.7 

21.7 

4.4 

(NA) 
21.3 



5.8 

17.0 
1.9 

(NA) 
9.4 



NA Not available. 



vision of the Standard Industrial Classification Manual, 
( Executive Office of the President, Bureau of the Budg- 
et, 1957). 

The SIC is the system used by all Federal statistical 
agencies, by most State agencies, and many private or- 
ganizations. There is no other industrial classification 
system in widespread use, nor is there any other general 
purpose system that is described in detail inofficial man- 
uals or other published documents. Awareness of the SIC 
by business analysts, executives, statisticians, research 
scholars, and others has grown rapidly and will continue to 
increase particularly in view of the adaptability of the 
decimal numeric system in mechanical processing. 

The SIC is an industrial classification of the total econ- 
omy. It divides all activities into broad industrial divi- 
sions (mining, manufacturing, retail, agriculture, etc.). 
It further subdivides each division into major industry 
groups, then into industry groups, and finally into indi- 
vidual industries. The numbering system provides flexi- 
bility, permitting use of classification at various levels of 
detail according to the specific needs and uses desired. 

The manual defines Division B as including all estab- 
lishments primarily engaged in mining. This term is used 
in the broad sense to include the extraction of minerals 
occurring naturally: solids, such as coal and ores; liq- 
uids, such as crude petroleum; and gases, such as natural 
gas. The term "mining" is also used in the broad sense 
to include quarrying, well operation, milling (crushing, 
screening, washing, flotation, etc.), and other preparation 



needed to render the mineral marketable. Exploration is 
included as is the development of mineral properties. 
Services performed on a contract, fee, or other basis in 
the development of mineral properties are classified sep- 
arately but within this division. 

Mining operations are classified by industry, on the ba- 
sis of the principal mineral produced or, if there is no 
production, on the basis of the principal mineral for which 
exploration or development work is in process. The re- 
covery of material from culm banks, ore dumps, and other 
waste minerals piles is classified in the appropriate min- 
ing industry according to the mineral product recovered. 

Mineral preparation plants are usually operated togeth- 
er with mines or quarries and frequently no separate re- 
cords for them are maintained. All such preparation 
plants are included in the scope of the minerals census. 
In general, separately operated preparation plants, whether 
they process minerals for the account of the operator or 
on a custom or toll basis for others, are also included in 
the minerals census. Coal cleaning and sizing plants op- 
erated at mines or as separate establishments are so in- 
cluded. However, the crushing, grinding, or otherwise 
treating of certain nonmetallic minerals at separately op- 
erated plants is included in the manufacturing industries. 

Contract hauling (except out of open-pits in conjunction 
with mining) is excluded from the mineral industries. 

Statistics on mining operations which are carried on as 
secondary activities at manufacturing establishments (such 
as clay pits at clay products plants or sand and gravel op- 



INTRODUCTION 



erations at ready -mix concrete plants) are not within the 
scope of thiscensus. However, certain information on these 
operations has been obtaincxl in the 1958 Census of Manu- 
factures and is included in some of the summary and in- 
dustry reports and in the State reports. Wherever such in- 
clusion occurs, it is clearly specified. 

All blast furnaces; metal smelters, metal and petrole- 
um refineries; plants manufacturing cement, brick, tile, 
and pottery; and plants engaged in dressing or polishing 
stone are classified in the manufacturing industries. Se- 
parate reports were obtained and included in the minerals 
census for the few ore dressing plants operated in conjunc- 
tion with smelters and for the few natural gas liquids recov- 
ery plants operated as parts of chemical establishments. 



5. Industry Classification 

The industry classifications used in this Census are 
those specified in the Standard Industrial Classification. 
This classification divides the "Mining" industries into 
five Major Groups: Metal mining; Anthracite mining; 
Bituminous coal and lignite mining; Oil and gas extraction; 
and Nonmetallic minerals, except fuels, mining. These five 
major groups are divided into 20 subgroups and into 55 in- 
dividual industries. Table C shows the relative magnitude 
of the 5 major groups in terms of value added in mining and 
employment. 

TABLE C— VALUE ADDED AND EMPLOYMENT IN THE MINERAL 
INDUSTRIES, BY MAJOR INDUSTRY GROUP: 1958 





Value added in 

mining 


Employment 


Industry group 


Million 
dollars 


Percent 

of 

total 


Thousand 
employees 


Percent 

of 

total 


All mineral in- 
dustries. ....... 

Metal mining 

Anthracite mining... 

Bituminous coal and 
lignite mining 

Oil and gas extrac- 
tion. •..•••••••..... 


13,381 

1,187 
164 

1,610 

9,035 

1,384 


100 

9 

1 

12 
68 

10 


733 

93 
23 

188 
313 

117 


100 

13 
3 

26 

43 


Nonmetallic minerals 
mining 


16 







Separate general statistics are published for all the SIC 
industries. Also, selected statistics are published for cer- 
tain subindustries, such as lead ores, zinc ores, oil- and 
gas-field well surveying and cement wells services, 
crushed and broken limestone, glass sand, and asbestos. 
The definitions of these industries and subindustries are 
included in the introductory texts of the pertinent industry 
reports. 

The industry and subindustry classifications used in the 
1958 minerals census are, in general, the same as the in- 
dustry classifications used in the 1954 minerals census, 
since it was possible to include classifications proposed for 
the 1957 SIC revisions as industry groupings or as subin- 
dustries in the 1954 census. 

6. Establishment Statistics 

The Census of Mineral Industries obtains data, on the ba- 
sis of an entire establishment, for the output and shipments 
of mineral products; operating and development costs; and 



labor, mechanical equipment, and materials requirements. 
Because of the nature of most operators' records, these 
data necessarily include the secondary products of the es- 
tablishment as well as the primary products which deter- 
mine the industry classification. Thus, some bituminous 
coal mines also produce clay, many oil wells also produce 
gas, silver ores contain significant quantities of copper, 
lead, zinc, gold, and other metals. Mines producing sig- 
nificant quantities of two or more different minerals are 
classified according to the mineral of greatest value (not 
tonnage) shipped during the year. A mine producing ores 
containing both silver and lead, for instance, is classi- 
fied as a silver mine if the silver contained exceeds in 
value the lead content and vice versa. In most mining in- 
dustries, however, the production of secondary minerals 
is of little statistical importance. This differs from the 
situation in manufacturingwhere about half of the industries 
have secondary production amounting to 10 percent or more 
of total shipments. 

Operating companies were instructed that a mineral es- 
tablishment, for purposes of the census report, is generally 
defined as a single physical location where mineral opera- 
tions are conducted; for example, a mine only, a mine and 
preparation plant, or a preparation plant only. An estab- 
lishment in this census, in general, represents workings at 
a given locality in which operations are conducted as a unit 
or are unified by common management or joint handling of 
some part of the mining or preparation process . Individual 
shafts, openings, or sites, however, are not necessarily 
considered as individual establishments. 

For oil- and gas-field operations and contract serv- 
ices, reports were required for units somewhat different 
from the "establishment" reporting unit used for other 
types of mining. Only one report was required for all 
oil- and gas-field operations of a reporting company in 
each State. (However, information on employment and 
oil and gas production was included in this report on a 
county basis.) For service operations, only one report 
was required for all mineral services of a company in 
continental United States and its territories of Hawaii and 
Alaska. (However, information on employment and receipts 
for services were requested by county.) 

In practice, some flexibility was allowed in the application 
of the establishment definition in specific industries. 
Where a company did not keep separate records for two or 
more establishments engaged in the same type of activity 
and located within the same State and county, a consolidated 
report was usually accepted and the operaions counted as 
a single establishment. Separate reports were frequent- 
ly furnished for open-pit and underground operations, but 
consolidated reports were made for most industries, and 
such consolidation becomes very important in the anthra- 
cite industry. 

Census tabulations of establishment reports differ sub- 
stantially from those prepared on a company basis which 
not only combine activities at different locations (thereby 
eliminating interplant transfers) but also include the manu- 
facturing activities of companies primarily engaged in min- 
ing. Census figures also differ to some extent from other 
surveys based on establishment reports where the defini- 
tion of an establishment as to location and line of activity 
is not so rigidly applied. 

Establishment counts shown in the 1958 Census are 
closely comparable with those for most earlier years. 
However, for some years, such as 1929 and 1919, consoli- 
dated reports covering two or more operations appear to 
have been accepted to a greater extent than in 1958. 



INTRODUCTION 



7. Coverage of the Census 

The 1958 Census of Mineral Industries excludes very 
small establishments and certain noncommercial opera- 
tions. The small establishments excluded represent those 
without employees and for which each of the following three 
items amounted to less than $500 for the entire year: (1) 
value of products shipped and serivces performed for oth- 
ers; (2) expenses for wages, salaries, supplies, minerals 
received for preparation, fuel, purchased electric energy, 
contract work, and purchased machinery; and (3) capital 
expenditures for development and exploration of mineral 
properties, new construction and major alterations, and 
new and used machinery and equipment. 

The cutoff for establishments covered in the 1958 census 
was essentially the same as that used for 1954, but lower 
than in other recent minerals censuses. For 1939 and 1929, 
in general, small establishments were excluded if each of 
three similar items amounted to $2,500, and for 1919, if 
value of products was less than $500 and expenditures 
for development work less than $5,000. For bituminous 
coal and lignite an output criteria of 1,000 tons was used 
in these three censuses. For 1939, common sand and 
gravel operations were excluded if they produced less than 
15,000 tons of sand and gravel and had expenses of less 
than $15,000. For 1929, common sand and gravel estab- 
lishments producing less than 25,000 tons were excluded, 
and this industry was not covered in censuses prior to 
1929. Minima for size of establishment included were 
not provided for earlier censuses. 

The production of minerals, particularly stone, sand, and 
gravel, by Federal, State, and local governments is excluded 



from the census. Also excluded is some production of these 
items by highway contractors who do not maintain separate 
records for sand and gravel production. The census in- 
cludes, however, mining establishments operated entirely 
to serve other establishments of the same company, such 
as coal mines serving only coke ovens operated by the same 
company, oil and gas wells serving only refineries or pub- 
lic utilities owned by the same company, and copper mines 
and mills where all of the ore is transferred to a company 
owned smelter. 

The 1958 Census of Mineral Industries covered establish- 
ments meeting the value criteria whether or not they had 
employees. The mailing lists available for establishments 
with no employees, such as establishments for which all 
labor was furnished by proprietors or contractors, were 
somewhat less complete than for those with employees. 
However, it is believed that in most areas such establish- 
ments were included where they met the specified criteria. 
Specific limitations in such coverage are discussed in the 
separate industry texts. 

Establishments reported as having no employees ac- 
counted for 11 percent of all establishments, and those with 
less than 5 employees for 54 percent. Establishments with 
less than 5 employees, however, accounted for only about 
4 percent of thevalueof shipments reported for all mineral 
industries for 1958 and for 6 percent of capital expend- 
itures. Establishments without employees were most im- 
portant in certain metal mining industries, and in the an- 
thracite, crude petroleum and natural gas, dimension stone, 
common clay, mica, pumice and pumi-cite, and peat indus- 
tries. Table D shows the relative importance of such es- 
tablishments by industry groups. 



TABLE D.— NUMBER OF ESTABLISHMENTS, VALUE OF SHIPMENTS, AND CAPITAL EXPENDITURES FOR ESTABLISHMENTS WITH LESS TttAN 5 EM- 
PLOYEES, AND NUMBER OF ESTABLISHMENTS FOR ESTABLISHMENTS WITH NO EMPLOYEES, AS PERCENTS OF TOTALS FOR ALL ESTABLISH- 
MENTS IN THE MINERAL INDUSTRIES, BY INDUSTRY GROUPS: 1958 



Industry group 



Establishments with less than 5 eraployees 



Number of 
establishments 



Total 



With no 
employees 



Value of 
shipments 
and receipts 



Capital 
expenditures 



All mineral industries , 

Metal mining , 

Iron ores , 

Copper ores 

Lead and zinc ores , 

Gold and silver ores , 

Bauxite , 

Ferroalloy ores , 

Metal mining services 

Miscellaneous metal ores , 

Anthracite mining , 

Bituminous coal and lignite mining. . 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas. 

Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Dimension stone 

Crushed and broken stone 

Sand and gravel 

Clay and related minerals , 

Chemical and fertilizer minerals, 
Nonmetallic minerals services..., 
Miscellaneous minerals , 

Less than 0.05 percent. 



5K 
67 

29 
58 
63 
88 
52 
71 
51 
72 

67 

Wi 

60 
72 
15 
U^ 

Uk 
63 
25 
50 
^8 
35 
LH 
63 



11 

26 
9 
22 
22 
LZ 
\k 
'i'i 
7 
27 

38 

6 

11 

15 

1 

3 

9 

16 

U 

9 

15 

6 

L, 

21 



-4.3 

1.6 
1.^ 
0.1 



U.5 
3.9 
3.6 
2.7 

12. .4 

2.9 

k.n 

5.6 
1.5 
3.6 

4.6 



(^) 



16.3 

9.5 
5.8 
0.5 
10.7 
6.7 



6.0 

5.2 
2.5 
0.6 
8.0 
40.6 

20.9 
7.8 
6.1 

8.1 

5.3 

6.0 

6.0 

U.3 

2.0 

7.4 
44.9 

3.0 
15.8 

5.8 

0.7 
25.2 
13.8 



INTRODUCTION 



In general, it is believed that the 1958 minerals census 
reports provided essentially complete coverage of pro- 
duction and development operations. However, the coverage 
was probably somewhat less complete for the crude petro- 
leum and natural gas industry. Only about 97 percent of the 
total shipments of oil, and probably about 97 percent of the 
total shipments of gas, were covered. This may be com- 
pared with an indicated 96 and 95 percent, respectively, in 
the 1954 minerals census. The special problems faced in 
covering this industry, and details on the apparent coverage 
attained, are discussed in the special text for Crude Petro- 
leum and Natural Gas. Undercoverage of the crude petro- 
leum and natural gas industry appears to have reduced the 
over- all minerals census coverage of value of shipments 
by only about 1 percent. However, this undercoverage is 
more significant for certain States, particularly for Kansas 
and Oklahoma where the apparent coverage of all mineral 
operations in the State was between 94 and 95 percent. 



8. Census Geo graphic Divisions 

In order to present census data at a level intermediate 
between the United States and the individual 48 States, the 
Census Bureau has used regional groupings for over a 
century. Beginning with the 1909 Census of Mines and 
Quarries, the present nine geographic divisions have been 
used. 

Not only are these groupings convenient for the sum- 
mary presentation of census statistics below the United 
States level, but they are needed to present uniform geo- 
graphic information for those individual industries in 
which application of the Census disclosure law precludes the 
publication of individual State figures. The relative im- 
portance of the mineral industries in 1958 among States and 
geographic divisions is shown in Table E. 



TABLE E.— VALUE ADDED IN MINING BY GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS AND STATES: 1958 



Division and State 


Value 

added 

in mining 

(million 

dollars ) 


Per- 
cent 


Division and State 


Value 

added 

in mining 

(million 

dollars) 


Per- 
cent 


Division and State 


Value 

added 

in mining 

(million 

dollars) 


Per- 
cent 


United States, 
total 


13,381 

32 
2 
2 

7 

11 
1 
9 

733 

116 

38 

580 

936 

191 
103 
452 
158 
32 

919 

312 

33 


100.0 

0.2 

(^^ 
{') 
0.1 

0.1 

(') 

0.1 

5.5 
0.9 
0.3 
4.3 

7.0 
1.4 
0.8 
3.4 
1.2 
0.2 

6.9 
2.3 
0.2 


West North Central — 
Con. 

Missouri 


66 
40 
25 
64 
378 

940 
1 23 

135 
607 
28 
13 
52 
83 

651 
320 
69 
127 
135 


0.5 
0.3 
0.2 
0.5 
2.8 

7.0 
0.2 

1.0 
4.5 
0.2 
0.1 
0.4 
0.6 

4.9 
2.4 
0.5 
0.9 

1.0 


West South Central.. 
Arkansas 


6,159 

111 

1,528 

674 
3,846 

1,746 
116 

37 
344 
249 
532 
189 
246 

32 

1,265 
24 
16 

1,225 


46.0 
0.8 


New England 

Maine 


Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 


11.4 

5.0 

23.7 


North Dakota 

South Dakota 

Nebraska 

Kansas 

South Atlantic 

Delaware 


New Hampshire 

Vermont 


Mountain ....•.•..•.. 


13.0 

0.9 


Massachusetts 




Rhode Island 

Connecticut 


Idaho 


0.3 
2.6 




Colorado 

New Mexico 




Middle Atlantic 

New York 


Maryland 

District of Co- 
lumb ia 


1.9 
4.0 
1.4 




Utah 

Nevada 

Pacific 




New Jersey 

Pennsylvania 

East North Central... 


Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina.... 
South Carolina.... 
Georgia 


1.8 
0.2 

9.5 


Ohio 

Indiana 


Washington 

Oregon 


0.2 




Florida 

East South Central... 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 


0.1 


Illinois 


California 




Michigan 


9.2 


Wisconsin 




West North Central... 




Minnesota ..•••••.. 


Alabama 

Mississippi 




I owa 









■"■Less than 0.05 percent. 



9. Cooperation with the Bureau of Mines 

The Bureau of Mines, United States Department of the 
Interior, cooperated with the Bureau of the Census in con- 
ducting the 1958 minerals census. The purpose of this 
cooperation was to assure comparable coverage and com- 
parable but, insofar as feasible, unduplicated results. 

The Bureau of Mines supplied copies, or partial copies, 
of its mailing lists (1) to assure that all establishments 
producing minerals which were shown in its lists would 
also be covered in the 1958 censuses and (2) to provide 
a list of establishments having no employees. Consid- 
erable supplementation of the Census "No employee" 
lists was provided from this source, particularly for Ma- 
jor Groups 10, 11, and 14. 



The Bureau of Mines played an important role in the de- 
velopment of the report forms in order to minimize du- 
plication of requested data and to assure at the same time 
that some comparable items were included by both agencies 
to relate the more detailed Bureau of Mines commodi- 
ty data to the Census statistics. The Bureau of Mines also 
cooperated in the development of a comparison of the basic 
commodity statistics tabulated by the two agencies. This 
is shown in table 7 of the General Summary Report. 

10. Census Mailing List 

The basic mailing list for the 1958 Censuses of Min- 
eral Industries, Manufactures, and Business, comprised 
all employers (except farmers. State and local govern- 



INTRODUCTION 



merits, and a few other classes) who made one or more 
quarterly payments in 1958 under the Federal Insurance 
Contributions Act. The list was obtained from the In- 
ternal Revenue Service of the Treasury Department. 
It contained all of the information necessary for mailing 
of the Census questionnaires except the industry classi- 
fication of the employer. 

The IRS list was compared with various lists carrying 
the industry identification necessary for selection of the 
appropriate Census questionnaire. The matching opera- 
tions, which were done on electronic equipment, were 
made possible by the fact that both the IRS list and cer- 
tain of the classified lists contained the Social Security 
employer identification number. 

Mailing list supplementation was necessary for "mul- 
tiunit" companies — those with more than one mining, 
manufacturing, or business establishment. A precanvass 
was conducted by use of Forms NCX-IA and NCX-IB. 
Form NCX-IA was sent to about 10,000 large companies 
and called for a listing of subsidiary corporations and 
of each establishment owned by the parent company or 
its subsidiaries. Form NCX-IB was sent to about 40,- 
000 smaller firms. These forms differed only in that 
NCX-IA prelisted all known establishments operated. 
The NCX-IB, which went to firms with less than 5 estab- 
lishments in 1954, did not prelist the establishments. The 
precanvass was performed jointly for the Censuses of 
Mineral Industries, Manufactures, and Business. 

A general purpose form, NCX-3, was used for con- 
cerns having EI numbers on the IRS list which did not 
match the classified lists, and in cases where the EI 
numbers matched but the classified lists did not pro- 
vide sufficient information for selection of a specific 
questionnaire. The industry code of employers thus can- 
vassed was assigned after receipt of the NCX-3 on the 
basis of the information reported on that form. When the 
establishment filing the NCX-3 was large or where other- 
wise necessary, additional information was obtained to 
complete the appropriate inquiries for the industry to 
which the establishment was assigned. 

The files were supplemented by Bureau of Mines lists, 
which furnished the principal source of names, addresses, 
and industry classifications for establishments without 
employees. (See Section 9.) In addition, for the oil and 
gas industries, they were supplemented by a precanvas- 
ses of oil and gas field service companies to obtain the 
names and addresses of companies served. Almost 4,000 
names were added to the oil and gas field operators list 
on the basis of this survey. 

In the 1958 Census the report forms were distributed 
and returned by mail. Personal or telephone contact was 
made only when the operator did not respond to the initial 
request or follow-up letters. The mailing, collection, 
check-in control, screening, coding, routine editing, and 
punching were performed at the Bureau's operations of- 
fice in Jeffersonville, Indiana. Subsequent work was done 
in Washington, D. C. 

At various stages of processing of the reports coverage 
checks were conducted to determine whether establish- 
ments on the original list were represented in the proc- 
essing stage under study. Moreover, many comparisons 
were made with mailing lists being used currently by the 
Bureau of Mines. These checks indicated virtually com- 
plete mailing of reports to all names on the mailing list. 
For omissions discovered in these checks, either the 
missing reports were located or new reports obtained. 



11. Census Report Forms 

Only one report form was required, in general, for the 
operations of each establishment. The report forms used 
were adapted to the 55 industries classified in mining, 
27 different establishment forms being provided for the 
1958 minerals census. These included 20 standard forms 
used for all large and multiestablishment companies and 
7 short forms used for small establishments. For the 
larger industries, the standard forms, requiring full cen- 
sus detail, were used only for establishments above a 
given size in terms of number of employees. For the 
numerous smaller establishments, typically having less 
detailed records and representing a very small portion of 
output and employment, data requirements were limited to 
a relatively few key items on a series of short forms dif- 
fering principally in the preprinted lists of product class 
items in the shipments inquiry. The size cutoff for short 
forms varied according to the size composition of the 
industry so that, while the forms covered a small per- 
centage of each industry's aggregates (employment, etc.), 
they represented a much higher porportion of number of 
establishments. The cutoff generally ranged from 4 to 
10 employees. In a few of the very small industries no 
short forms were used. (About 15,000 of the approxi- 
mately 36,000 reports in the minerals census were tabu- 
lated from short forms.) 

Using the administrative records of the Bureau of Old 
Age and Survivors Insurance in conjunction with existing 
Bureau of the Census records, it was possible to deter- 
mine correctly, in most cases, the type of form each 
establishment should receive. 

(a) Standard Forms . — Each standard form called for 
the same general items— employment, payrolls, man- 
hours, materials costs, detailed fuels and electric en- 
ergy costs, and capital expenditures — regardless of the 
industry or industry group. However, the forms differed 
in that detailed inquiries on the quantity and value of in- 
dividual products shipped and individual supplies used 
as well as miscellaneous inquiries such as types of opera- 
tion and oil well drilling costs were adapted to the individ- 
ual industry or industry group. (Sample forms appear in 
Volume I— Appendix C.) 

(b) Short Forms. — These forms, designed for small es- 
tablishments as noted above, were an abbreviated version 
of the standard forms and requested limited general and 
product information. For example, only total employment 
and payroll figures were requested, without detail by func- 
tional class (production workers and all other employees); 
production- worker man-hours and wages were not re- 
quested on short forms. Instead of detailed information 
on individual products the short forms requested value of 
shipments mainly in terms of product classes. There 
were 7 different short forms: one for metal mining, one 
for coal mining, 2 for oil and gas extraction, and 3 for 
nonmetallic minerals mining. 

(c) Form for Separate Central Administrative Offices 
and Auxiliaries of Mining Companies. Separate reports 
for each central administrative office and auxiliary unit 
(storage warehouses, research laboratories, garages, re- 
pair shops, etc.), which served the mining establishments 
of the company rather than the general public, were obtained 
from the company if they were at locations different from 
the establishments servedor if they serviced more than one 
establishment. The report form included inquiries on pay- 
rolls and employment. Approximately 600 such mining re- 
ports were tabulated in 1958. They accounted for about 
42 thousand employees with payrolls of about $308 million, 



INTRODUCTION 



which represents 5.7 percent and 8.2 percent, respective- 
ly, of the totals for all mining. 

The employment and payrolls for these separate ad- 
ministrative offices and auxiliaries are included in the in- 
dustry and State totals, unless otherwise specified. The 
employment and payrolls of such administrative offices 
and auxiliaries are also shown separately as tables 4 
and 5 of the summary report, Employment and Related 
Statistics. 

(d) A special form was provided for offshore oil and gas 
operations . It was required for each State in which a com- 
pany performed such operations. 

12. Comparison of 195 8 and 1954 Census Report Forms 

The inquiries on the 1958 census forms were very simi- 
lar, in general, to those on the 1954 forms. There were 
some basic differences, however, in the information re- 
quested. 

(a) The 1958 report forms requested somewhat less de- 
tail on the quantity and value of shipments than in 1954. 
This was in order to eliminate, insofar as possible, du- 
plications between Census and Bureau of Mines product 
detail. The 1958 data are primarily product class sta- 
tistics which provide a benchmark for Bureau of Mines 
figures and serve to relate available more detailed prod- 
uct statistics to the Census statistics on operating costs 
and capital expenditures. 

(b) For 1958, no data were requested on the horsepower 
of power equipment or on loading equipment used. The 
Census program provides for obtaining such data only once 
in approximately 10 years. It is planned that such data 
will be obtained as part of the 1963 Census program. 

(c) No information was obtained on water used in the 
mineral industries. Such data are now being collected 
periodically by the United States Bureau of Mines. 

(d) Employment and receipts for services by county 
were obtained for the first time from all service establish- 
ments. Operators of oil and gas field properties also re- 
ported for the first time natural gas shipments by county. 
These data permitted the first publication in the State re- 
ports of complete county statistics on employment, pay- 
rolls, and value of shipments and receipts. 



13. Establishment Location and Company Characteristics 



Information was 
physical location, 
number, company 
This information 
coverage control 
Mailing List), but 
establishment by 
organization. 



obtained on all 1958 forms regarding the 

Social Security employer identification 
affiliation, and legal form of ownership, 
not only provided for completeness-of- 

in the census (see section 10.- Census 
also permitted the classification of each 

geographic location and type of legal 



14. Type of Operation 

The rype of operation statistics in industry reports are 
based primarily on replies to a check box inquiry which 
listed the usual mining and mineral preparation methods 
used in a particular industry. The respondent was asked to 
check each method used in the establishment reported. 
Wherever possible, separate statistics are provided on es- 
tablishments using underground mining methods, using a 
combination of underground and open-pit methods, and using 
open-pit methods only. For selected industries, separate 
statistics are provided by type of underground mining, such 



as for establishments having as the dominant method open 
stoping, shrinkage stoping, square setting, or block caving. 
Separate figures are provided, where possible, for mines 
with and without preparation plants; and for establishments 
with preparation plants classified by the dominant prepa- 
ration method, suchas crushing, washing, flotation, or grav- 
ity concentration. Separate statistics are also provided 
on producing and nonproducing operations, an establishment 
being defined as nonproducing if no mineral products were 
shipped during the year. For the crude petroleum and 
natural gas industries, details were obtained on the type of 
wells drilled and operated and reports were classified on 
the basis of whether they represented oil wells only, both 
oil and gas wells, or gas wells only, and on the basis of 
whether or not they included drilling. 

15. N umber of Operating Companies 

For the purpose of this census, an operating company is 
defined as a corporation, individual proprietorship, part- 
nership, cooperative, or other organization, regardless of 
size, directly engaged in production or development activi- 
ties at one or more mineral establishments. An operating 
company may own the property operated or be the lessee of 
such property oroperatefor the account of others on a con- 
tract or fee basis. Regardless of the number of establish- 
ments operated by a company, or the number of States op- 
erated in, the company is counted only once in summary 
statistics. Hence, the sum of the detailed statistics for 
number of operating companies is usually greater than the 
statistics shown for group totals. 

16. Persons Engaged 

The employment statistics represent all full-time and 
part-time employees at the establishment who worked or 
received pay for any part of the pay period ending nearest 
the 15th of the months specified on the report form. In- 
cluded are all persons on paid sick leave, paid holidays, 
and paid vacation during these pay periods. Also included 
are employees of miners paid on a per ton, car, or yard 
basis. Excluded are employees at the mine but who were 
on the payroll of another employer (such as employees 'of 
contractors) and employees at company stores, boarding 
houses, bunk houses, and recreational centers. Also ex- 
cluded are members of the armed forces, and pensioners 
carried on the rolls but not working during the period. 
Officers of corporations are included as employees; but 
proprietors and partners of unincorporated firms are ex- 
cluded. 

This total employment is divided into two functional clas- 
sifications comparable with the basic classifications used 
for the manufacturing industries. The instructions to 
mining companies for reporting these two employee 
classifications were as follows; 

Production and development workers . — Employees up 
through the working foreman level engaged in manual 
work, using tools, operating machines, hauling materials, 
loading and hauling products out of the mine in mine cars 
or trucks, and caring for mines, plants, mills, shops, or 
yards. Included are exploration work, mine develop- 
ment, storage, shipping, maintenance, repair, watchmen 
services, auxiliary production for use at establishments 
(such as power plant), record keeping, and other serv- 
ices closely associated with these production and de- 
velopment operations at the establishment covered by 
the report. Gang and straw bosses and foremen who 
performed manual labor are included, as are employees 



8 



INTRODUCTION 



paid on either a time- orpiccc-ratebasis. Also, included 
are miners paid on a per ton, car, or yard basis and the 
men engaged by them and paid out of the total amount 
received by these miners, and other employees at the 
establishment but not on its payroll if paid directly 
through its own employees, such as superintendents and 
foremen. Supervisory employees above the working 
foreman level are excluded from this category. 

All other employees. — Nonproduction personnel at the 
establishment and above the working foreman level. 
These are engaged in such activities as supervision, 
sales, highway trucking (by employees not entering mines 
or pits), advertising, credit collection, clerical, and 
routine office functions, executive, purchasing, finance, 
legal, personnel (including cafeteria and medical), pro- 
fessional (such as engineers and geologists), and tech- 
nical activities. Also included are employees on the 
payroll of the establishment engaged in the construction 
of major additions or alterations to the plant who are 
utilized as a separate work force. (Workers engaged in 
regular maintenace and repair operations are not in- 
cluded here but are classified as "production and de- 
velopment workers.") 

Employees at an office located at or near the mining 
establishment are usually included in the mine report. 
Where such offices or auxiliary units were reported 
separately their employees are included in the totals for 
individual industries and the State tables for each indus- 
try, but are not always classified by type of operation 
or by frequency class in frequency tabulations. These 
figures, classified by industry and State, are also shown 
separately in the summary report. Employment and Re- 
lated Statistics. This practice differs from that used in 
the Census of Manufactures, in which employment at central 
administrative offices and auxiliary units were included 
in total manufacturing but not in individual industries. 

In the mineral industry reports, besides these sta- 
tistics on two types of employment, figures are shown on 
the total number of proprietors and firm members, and 
separately on the number of these who regularly per- 
formed production or development work. 

17. Monthly and Average Employment 

The 1958 report forms requested employment figures 
for "production and development workers" for four se- 
lected pay periods (mid- month employment in March, 
May, August, and November). For "all other employees" 
only a mid-March figure was requested. The "annual 
average" is composed of an average of the four monthly 
figures for "production and development workers" plus the 
March figure for "all other employees." 

This approach was used to simplify the schedule for- 
mat and lighten the reporting burden of respondents, since 
it was found that the average of these selected pay periods 
approximates very closely for almost all industries the 
average employment for the year that would be obtained 
from 12 monthly pay periods. 

The employment averages shown in this report for all 
industries are based on the four-month figures described 
above. However, many of the mineral industries are 
highly seasonal. For such industries, figures on production 
and development workers were collected for all twelve 
months and are shown in table 3 of the industry reports. 



The average employment for mines, based on 4 or 12 
ionthly figures, is generally comparable with employment 



statistics compiled for manufacturing and mining by other 
Government agencies but is lower than the measure used 
in annual accident and other reports to the Bureau of 
Mines. The latter measure represents the "average 
number of employees on active days," excluding shut- 
down periods. Such averages generally exceed the av- 
erage for 12 months, sometimes by as much as 25 percent. 

18. Production and Development Worker Man-Hours 

The total man-hours figures represent all man-hours of 
production and development workers (as defined in Sec- 
tion 16) which were worked on both active days on which 
there was production or development work and on inactive 
days when only watchmen, inspectors, repairmen, and 
other maintenance men were on duty. They include all 
man-hours worked or paid for at the mining operations, 
except hours paid for vacations, holidays, or sick leave, 
when the employee was not at the mine. Included are ac- 
tual overtime hours, not straight-time equivalent hours. 
Man-hours of working proprietors are excluded. 

The Census man-hour figures differ from those pub- 
lished monthly by the Bureau of Labor Statistics which 
cover all hours paid for, whether or not worked, and re- 
late only to the payroll period ending nearest the middle 
of each month. They differ from man-hours collected by 
the Bureau of Mines which include data for all employees 
classified as exposed to accidents, rather than only pro- 
duction and development workers. 

Census man-hour figures were collected separately by 
department, such as for work in underground mining and 
development, in open- pit mining and stripping, at sur- 
face shops and yards for the mine, and at preparation 
plants (including auxiliary works for these plants). For 
the oil and gas industries, separate figures were obtained 
for operating and maintaining wells, for drilling wells and 
rig building, for exploration work, and for other work. A 
separate figure was also obtained on man-hours devoted 
to development and exploration work and charged to capital 
or depletion accounts. 

Man-hours were well reported for the larger estab- 
lishments, although the distribution by department was 
inadequately reported in some instances. Where total 
man-hours, or the distribution by department, were not 
reported and it was not feasible to obtain the informa- 
tion by correspondence, the data were estimated. Since 
such estimates were usually for small establishments, 
they have little effect on the validity of the statistics, 
except possibly those for small operations in the size 
of establishment tabulations. 

19. Payrolls for the Year 

This item represents the gross earnings paid in the 
calendar year 1958 to all employees on the payroll of 
mining establishments, and is comparable with the defi- 
nition of payrolls used for the Federal witholding tax. 
It includes all forms of compensation such as salaries, 
wages, commissions, dismissal pay, all bonuses, vacation 
and sick leave pay, and compensation in kind; prior to 
such deductions as employees' Social Security contribu- 
tions, withholding taxes, group insurance, union dues, and 
savings bonds. Included are payments to miners paid on a 
per ton, car, yard, or footage basis. The total includes 
salaries of officers of these establishments, if a corpora- 
tion; it excludes payments to the proprietor or partners, 
if an unincorporated concern. It excludes payments to 



INTRODUCTION 



members of the armed forces and pensioners carried on 
the active payroll of mining establishments. Also excluded 
are royalty payments to unions and costs of smithing, ex- 
plosives, fuses, electric cap lamps, and mine supplies 
used in production and development work but charged to 
employees and deducted from their wages. 

The 1958 Census definition of payrolls is that recom- 
mended to all Federal statistical agencies by the Bureau 
of the Budget, and is the same as that used for 1954. It 
should be noted that it does not include employers' So- 
cial Security contributions or other nonpayroU labor 
costs such as employers' pension plans, group insurance 
premiums, and workmen's compensation. It should be 
noted also that these payrolls include wages paid employ- 
ees of the establishment for development and construc- 
tion work which would be charged to the capital account. 

As in the case of employment figures, the payrolls of 
separately reported offices and auxiliary units are in- 
cluded in the industry and State tables, but also shown 
separately by industry and State in the summary report, 
Employment and Related Statistics. 

20. Supplies and Related Costs, Contract Work, and Pur- 
chased Machinery 

The 1958 Census report forms requested information on 
supplies, fuels, and electric energy used; on contract 
work done by others; and on purchased machinery in- 
stalled for each establishment. These items included 
charges to both the current and capital accounts. The 
figures reported were to include items used during 
1958 whether purchased, withdrawn from inventories, 
or received from .other establishments of the company. 
For selected supplies and fuels and for electric energy 
both quantity and cost data were requested. The cost 
data refer to direct charges actually paid or payable 
(after discounts) for items used during the year. Freight 
charges and other direct charges incurred by the estab- 
lishment in acquiring the items are included. Where 
the company's records did not show actual amounts used, 
they were asked to approximate use by adding purchases 
(or receipts) during the year to opening inventory and 
subtracting closing inventory. 

Separate figures were obtained for (a) selected sup- 
plies for some industries; (b) the value of minerals re- 
ceived for preparation (see Section 22); (c) the amount 
paid for electric energy purchased; (d) the amount paid 
for all purchased fuels used for heat, power, or the 
generation of electricity; (e) the cost of contract work 
done by others; (f) the cost of products bought and re- 
sold in the same condition; and (g) the cost of purchased 
machinery installed. Supplies and equipment used in 
mine development and plant expansion and capitalized 
repairs, which are chargeable to fixed assets accounts, 
were included as were supplies furnished without charge 
to contractors for use at the mining operation and also 
supplies sold to employees for use at the establishment 
(see Section 19). No data were obtained on such costs as 
advertising, insurance, telephone, and research and con- 
sulting services of other establishments; or on over- 
head costs, such as depreciation charges, rent, interest, 
and royalties. 

Under contract work , companies were instructed to 
report the total amounts paid or due for contract serv- 
ices performed during the year, including payments for 
supplies and equipment furnished by the contractor in- 



cidental to this work. If part of the payment to contrac- 
tors was in materials produced, the respondent was 
asked to estimate the value of the service performed. 
However, payments to miners paid on a per ton, car, 
yard, or footage basis were included under payrolls 
rather than under contract work (see Section 19). 

Under purchas ed tinachinery^, companies were instruc- 
ted to report all machinery, equipment, and parts for re- 
newals and repairs, including equipment installed in the 
mine or mill as well as mobile loading and transportation 
equipment. 

21. Specif ic Supplies Used 

In the 1958 minerals census, uniform quantity and 
cost data were obtained on the use of selected supplies. 
Comparable statistics on these items are available for 
1954. Collection of the supplies data was coordinated 
with the expanded manufactures statistics program for 
the 1958 Census, which obtained data on about 200 
materials for industries that accounted for 90 percent 
or more of their consumption in manufacturing. 

For the minerals census, data on the quantity and cost 
of explosives and of steel mill shapes and forms used 
were obtained for the metal mining industries and for 
coal mining, and also, for coal mining, data were obtained 
on the cost of round and hewn woods products and stump- 
age. For the crude petroleum and natural gas industries, 
data were obtained on the quantity and cost of gas pur- 
chased for gas lift and repressuring. 

22. Minerals Prepared 

On report forms for almost all mineral industries, ex- 
cept the oil and gas and contract services industries, a 
uniform inquiry was included on minerals prepared at the 
reported establishments. Separate quantity figures were 
obtained on minerals prepared from three sources: (a) 
crude minerals mined at the establishment (quantity); (b) 
crude minerals received from other establishments of the 
company or purchased from others (quantity and cost); and 
(c) crude minerals received for preparation on a custom 
or toll basis (quantity and estimated value). 

23. Capital Expenditures 

In the 1958 Census, mining companies were asked to 
report expenditures made during the year for develop- 
ment and exploration of mineral properties, for new con- 
struction, and for machinery purchased at their operations 
that were chargeable to fixed-assets accounts of the mining 
establishment and were of a type for which depreciation, 
depletion, or Defense Minerals Exploration Administration 
accounts are ordinarily maintained. Capital expenditures 
during 1958 were to be determined as: additions com- 
pleted during th year plus construction-in-progress at the 
end of the year minus construction-in-progress at the 
beginning of the year. Reported capital expenditures were 
to include work done on contract as well as by the mine 
forces. Expenditures for machinery and equipment were to 
include those made for replacement purposes, as well as 
those for additions to capacity. Excluded from such ex- 
penditures totals are costs of maintenance and repairs 
charged as current operating expense. Also excluded are 
expenditures for land and mineral rights. 

Wherever applicable, separate figures were provided on 
expenditures for: (a) development and exploration of 
mineral property, (b) preparation plant construction and 



10 



INTRODUCTION 



other construction, (c) new machinery and equipment, and 
(d) used plant and used equipment acquired from others. 
The 1954 minerals census which included comparable sta- 
tistics was the first to cover the totality of these items. 
However, for 1939, data were obtained separately on (b), 
(c), and (d). For 1929 and 1919, data were obtained on 
(a). 

The census figures for capital expenditures differ 
from estimates published on the basis of the Office of 
Business Economics-Securities and Exchange Commis- 
sion sample survey not only because of the sampling 
variations but much more due to the differences in scope 
of the surveys. Whereas census figures cover all min- 
ing establishments, but exclude all establishments of re- 
porting companies which are not classified in the min- 
eral industries, the QBE -SEC figures are based on re- 
ports for an entire company, classified on the basis of 
its principal activities. For this reason many large 
metal mining and oil and gas establishments are in- 
cluded, for example, in the OBE-SEC tabulations as 
part of manufacturing. Both series, however, exclude 
expenditures at establishments owned by Federal or 
State Governments but operated under lease or contract 
by private companies. 

24. Individual Products 

In the 1958 Census of Mineral Industries, information 
on output of about 240 individual mineral product items 
was collected. This represented a reduction from about 
760 individual products included in the 1954 minerals 
census. The 1954 list of products for which separate 
information was collected was prepared after extensive 
consultation with industry and Government represen- 
tatives. The detail provided for many industries was 
also greatly influenced by the type of detail usually 
collected in the Bureau of Mines annual surveys and 
needed by that agency to maintain comparability. Since 
joint forms with the Bureau of Mines were not used in 
the 1958 census, as they had been for many industries 
for 1954, detail collected in Bureau of Mines annual sur- 
veys was not duplicated in the census reports. 

In general, the 1958 minerals census figures were 
confined to separate totals for each crude and each pre- 
pared mineral. Where significant, separate shipments 
figures were also obtained for crude minerals going 
to preparation plants and those going to consumers. 

Figures were collected on both quantity and value of 
shipments. Shipments include commercial shipments 
and transfers of products to other operations of the same 
company. For products which are used to a significant 
extent within the same establishment for power or heat, 
and for minerals mined and prepared in the same es- 
tablishment, total production or separate data on pro- 
duction for such uses were collected. Typically, pro- 
duction was also collected for products for which there 
are usually significant differences between total pro- 
duction and total shipments as a result of stock changes. 

For service industries the amount received or due for 
services performed during 1958 was collected as a measure 
of output. For mine operators who also perform services 
the amount received for such services was added to the 
total value of products shipped to determine total "value 
of shipments and receipts" for each establishment. 

Table 6A of each report for individual industries 
provides the national and regional total shipments from 
all industries for each of the products primary to the in- 



dustries covered in the report. Table 5 provides sep- 
arate totals for the value of primary products of each 
industry shipped by the primary industry and the amount 
shipped by other industries. 

25. Shipments, Production, Custom Milling, and 
Net Shipments 

"Shipments" figures include all products physically 
shipped from the establishment during 1958, including 
material withdrawn from stockpiles, and products shipped 
on consignment, whether or not sold in 1958. Prepared 
material or concentrates include preparation from ores 
mined at the same establishment, purchased, received 
from other operations of the same company, or received 
for milling on a custom or toll basis. For products 
transferred to other establishments of the same company 
or prepared on a custom basis, the company was re- 
quested to report the approximate commercial value not 
merely the cost of producing the items. All values were 
requested f.o.b. the establishment reported. 

The figures for "Value of shipments and receipts" of 
an industry include for all establishments classified in 
the industry: (a) the value of all "primary" products 
of the industry; (b) the value of "secondary" products 
which are primary to other industries; (c) the receipts 
for contract work done for others (except custom milling); 
and (d) the value of products purchased and resold with- 
out further processing. Receipts for custom milling are 
omitted from this total and shown separately to avoid 
duplication with the value of custom milled ores included 
in (a) or (b). 

For industry and industry group totals some duplica- 
tion is introduced by the inclusion of materials trans- 
ferred from one establishment to another for mineral 
preparation. In general, where this duplication is sig- 
nificant, figures are shown both for "gross" and "net" 
shipments. The "net" shipments are obtained by sub- 
tracting the value of crude minerals transferred to other 
establishments for preparation from the "gross" ship- 
ments. Wherever value of shipments is shown without 
further specification, it represents gross shipments. 

For years prior to 1954, data on shipments were not 
collected. Instead, the report forms requested data on the 
quantity and value of production. In general, the data 
for these years were edited to represent "net" produc- 
tion, excluding duplications due to mining and later pre- 
paring the same material in the same industry. 

Another source of duplication in the industry totals, 
particularly in the major group totals, for value of ship- 
ments is the inclusion of the cost of contract work per- 
formed by one establishment for another as well as the 
value of products produced by the assistance of this 
contract work. Only part of the contract work performed 
during a given year, however, results in production 
during that year. Another significant portion results in 
capital additions to the industry. It was not possible 
to segregate these two types of contract work in the cen- 
sus tabulations and the exclusion of all receipts for 
contract work in a computation of net shipments must 
be considered an over adjustment. Of the types of con- 
tract work classified in the mining services industries, 
only contract mining of minerals and contract pumping 
of wells would always warrant deduction as duplication in 
the value of shipments totals, and these items amounted to 
less than 4 percent of the total receipts for contract work 
by minerals establishments in 1958. 



INTRODUCTION 



11 



A third element of duplication in the total value of 
shipments for all mineral industries, and in the major 
group totals for the fuel producing industries, is the 
transfer of coal and natural gas from one mining es- 
tablishment to another for use for power or heat. The 
total value of such fuels transferred for use in all min- 
eral industries, however, was only $57 million, or less 
than 0.3 percent of the gross value of shipments for all 
mineral industries. 

Table F shows, for major industry groups, gross 
shipments and two approximate computations of net 
shipments, the first adjusted only for the transfer of 
minerals from one establishment to another for prepara- 
tion and for purchases for resale without preparation and 
the second adjusted also by exclusion of all receipts for 
contract work. This second adjustment, for the reasons 
indicated above, is made only in table F, and nowhere 
else in the 1958 census reports. 

TABLE F.— GROSS AND APPROXIMATE NET SHIPMENTS IN THE 
MINERAL INDUSTRIES, BY MAJOR INDUSTRY GROUP: 1958 





1 

Gross 
shipments 
(million 
dollars) 


Net shipments 
(million dollars) 


Industry group 


Adjusted 

for 
transfer 

of 
minora Is ■'■ 


Adjusted 
for 
transfer of 
minerals 
and for 
contract 
work-"- 


All mineral 
industries 

Metal mining 


18,090 

1,836 
325 

2,^^23 
11,637 

1,869 


16,360 

1,571 
23-4 

2,091 
10,656 

1,808 


U,69A 

1,536 
197 

2,068 
9,100 

1,793 


Anthracite mining 

Bituminous coal and 

lignite mining 

Oil and gas extraction 
Nonmetallic minerals 

mining 



■^Adjusted also to exclude duplication of minerals trans- 
ferred to other establishments in the same industry for re- 
sale without preparation. 

26. Value Added in Mining 

This measure is computed for 1958 and 1954 by sub- 
tracting the cost of supplies, minerals received from 
other establishments for preparation, purchased fuels and 
electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery in- 
stalled from the value of shipments and receipts and capi- 
tal expenditures. This statistic avoids the duplication in 
value of shipments which results from the use of products 
of some establishments as supplies, energy sources, or 
materials by others. Moreover, it provides a measure 
not only of value added in mineral production but also in 
the development of mineral properties. For these reasons 
it is considered to be the best value measure for com- 
paring the relative economic importance of mining among 
industries and geographic areas. 

"Value of shipments and receipts" used in this cal- 
culation includes the shipments of all products of the min- 
ing establishment, together with receipts for work done for 
others. "Capital expenditures" used includes expenditures 
for development of mineral properties as well as for new 
construction and major alterations of preparation plants 



and other structures and expenditures for new and used 
machinery and equipment. The "costs" used in this cal- 
culation include costs charged to both the current and 
capital accounts. Both the shipments and costs figures 
include products bought and resold in the same condition. 

For 1939 and earlier years, comparable data are not 
available for capital expenditures or for costs of cap- 
italized supplies and equipment. However, a rough meas- 
ure of value added in mining is computed for these years 
by subtracting from the value of shipments and receipts 
the cost of supplies, minerals received for preparation, 
fuels, purchased electricity, and contract work. 

Value added in mining differs from "national income 
originating in mining," as presented in the national in- 
come estimates compiled by the Office of Business Eco- 
nomics, Department of Commerce. The latter measure 
is the sum of factor costs incurred by an industry in pro- 
duction. It excludes, in addition to cost of materials, 
such costs as depreciation charges, State and local taxes 
(other than corporate income taxes), allowance for bad 
debts, and purchases of services from other economic 
sectors, such as contract services classified in other 
sectors, services of engineering and management con- 
sultants, advertising, telephone and telegraph expenses, 
insurance, royalties, etc. It is, therefore, a more "net" 
concept for value added in mineral production than that 
used in the minerals census. On the other hand, the OBE 
figures do not include a measure of value added in devel- 
opment of mineral properties. 

27. Energy Used 

The 1958 Census of Mineral Industries obtained data 
on the quantity and cost of fuels and electric energy used 
in mining which are comparable, in general, to such data 
obtained in the 1954, 1939, 1929, and 1919 censuses. 
Separate quantity and cost figures were provided on 
purchased coal, fuel oil, gas, and electric energy, and 
a cost figure was obtained for other fuels. 

To supplement the data on energy and energy ma- 
terials purchased, data were obtained on the quantity 
of such items produced and used at the same establish- 
ment. In the minerals census, such data were obtained 
on coal, crude petroleum, and natural gas used at the 
producing establishment for power and heat, and on 
electric energy generated and used at the same mining 
operation. For electric energy, the figures actually 
collected represented total quantity generated (excluding 
generating-station use) and quantity of electric energy 
generated and sold. The difference between these two 
quantity figures represented electric energy generated 
and used. 

Experience, based on past censuses, indicates that 
the major portion of the information compiled on detailed 
fuels is reported by relatively large establishments in 
specific industries. For this reason, inquiries on fuel 
detail were not directed to (a) establishments classified 
in 14 of the 55 industries, accounting for about 2 percent 
of the total cost of fuels in 1954, and to (b) establish- 
ments reported on short forms. As a result of these 
limitations and due to some incomplete reporting, a 
total of $58 million was tabulated as "Undistributed" fuels 
costs, amounting to approximately 21 percent of the total 
fuels cost tabulated for 1958. 

In order to provide total figures for energy used in 
specific industries, States, and types of operations. 



12 



INTRODUCTION 



the energy figures were reduced to a common unit of 
measure representing kilowatt-hours, the international 
unit of energy. These figures include an estimated 
kilowatt-hour equivalent for "Other fuels" for which only 
"Cost" was reported and for the "Undistributed" fuels cost. 
The conversion factors used in computing these kilowatt- 
hour equivalents were: 

Coal 1 ton = 7,677 kwh 

Fuel oil i barrel = 1,707 kwh 

Natural gas 1 MCF = 307.7 kwh 

Other fuels $i = 250 kwh 

For "Undistributed" fuels costs, the conversion was based 
on the types of fuels used in 1958 or 1954 in the industry 
for which the undistributed costs were tabulated. 

28. Output Per Man-hour 

Statistics on output per man-hour are shown for most of 
the mineral industries, exclusive of the oil and gas ex- 
traction industries, as table 8 of the industry reports. 
For measuring output per man-hour, producing establish- 
ments were classified according to class intervals of out- 
put per man-hour, with outpu: usually measured in physi- 
cal units, such as tons of coal, representing the principal 
product of the industry. 

Where feasible, the distribution by output per man-hour 
was shown separately for major types of operation since 
it differs significantly for open-pits as compared with 
underground mines, and for a mine only, a mine and 
plant, and a plant only. The output per man-hour dis- 
tributions are also shown by geographic divisions and 
States for the bituminous coal industry. 

Meaningful ratios of output per man-hour could not 
be computed when a significant portion of the production 
resulted from the work of proprietors or contractors, 
for whom man-hour figures are excluded, or where a 
significant portion of the man-hours of production work- 
ers was spent in activity other than mineral production. 
Such operations were included as "unclassified." 

29. Ratio of Payr oll to Value Added in Mining 

General statistics are shown in Table 9 of each industry 
report for establishments classified on the basis of the 
ratio of payroll to value added in mining. In comparing 
labor costs with the other factors that contribute to value 
added it should be recognized, however, that value added 
as here computed includes many expenses for which no 
separate data were obtained in the 1958 minerals census, 
such as taxes, royalties, and interest paid; and nonpayroU 
benefits to employees. 

30. I mputation of Data 

Short forms were used to obtain information for about 
15,000 small establishments. In these forms less detail 
was obtained on selected items, such as employment, 
cost of supplies, fuels, electricity, and on the status of 
wells and drilling costs for oil and gas operations. 
Certain items were omitted entirely, such as man-hours. 

To obtain industry totals, estimates were prepared for 
detail omitted for such establishments on the basis of 



information reported on long forms for similar opera- 
tions. 

Imputation of missing items was made feasible by use 
of the Census Bureau's high speed electronic computer. 
The procedures for imputation were of two types. For 
short form respondents, production and development work- 
ers and production and development worker wages were 
imputed from fixed ratios specified in advance from 
historical relationships of these items to total employees 
and total payroll. For other items to be imputed (for 
example, the breakdown of total capital expenditures to 
the 4 classes of expenditures) the imputation was made 
by a randomizing process in which eight similar estab- 
lishments (same industry and same size class) were 
used in deriving the ratios needed for imputation of each 
establishment. 

For industries characterized by large establishments, 
the percentage of imputation of general measures such 
as employment and payrolls, cost of materials, expendi- 
tures, and the like is very small; for industries in which 
small establishments account for a large portion of the 
totals, imputations may amount to 10 percent or more. 

31. Confidentiality of Data for Individual Companies 

The Bureau of the Census is prohibited by law from 
publishing any statistics that disclose information re- 
ported by individual companies. In the 1958 Census, as 
in 1954, preference was given to geographic regions and 
divisions over individual States in applying disclosure 
rules; similarly. States took precedence over counties. 
In tables showing industry detail, major industry group 
(2-digit) totals were given preference over industry 
group (3-digit) totals which, in turn, had precedence over 
individual (4-digit) industries. 

Such order-of-precedence was used because (1) it was 
considered preferable to show regional data for an in- 
dustry, even at the cost of withholding data for another 
(usually the least important) State in a region, rather 
than to show all publishable data for the individual States 
and group the disclosure States throughout the United 
States in an "all other" category as was frequently done 
in the 1939 and earlier censuses; and (2) by giving pref- 
erence to industry group statistics over individual in- 
dustries within each State, the extent to which individual 
statistics can be compared within the SIC industry classi- 
fication framework is greatly increased. 

For each State not shown separately in table 2 of the 
industry report, a footnote gives the number of establish- 
ments and either an employment range or the actual em- 
ployment figure. The employment is shown in a range if 
the State had less than 1,000 employees, and the employ- 
ment data represented the total for only one or two com- 
panies, or if the exact figure would premit deriving (by 
subtraction) the number of employees in other States rep- 
resented by only one or two companies. In addition, fig- 
ures for States with less than 50 employees, in general, 
are shown only in the footnote together with the number of 
establishments and employment in a range. 

In the Area Volume, figures are not shown for a 
county or for an industry within a State if the publication 
of such statistics would disclose information for individual 
companies. In table 4 of that Volume, however, the 



INTRODUCTION 



13 



number of establishments, distributed by employment 
size, is shown for every county by 3-digit industry group. 

For industries with few establishments or considerable 
geographic concentration, it has frequently been neces- 
sary to use geographic regions broader than the tradi- 
tional nine census divisions, in order to show all es- 
tablishments by some geographic grouping. For this 
purpose the following combinations of Census divisions 
have been used: 



NORTHEAST 

New England 
Middle Atlantic 



SOUTH 

South Atlantic 
East South Central 
West South Central 



NORTH CENTRAL WEST 

East North Central Mountain 
West North Central Pacific 



32. Abbreviations 

The following abbreviations 
quently in tables and footnotes: 



and symbols occur fre- 



Zero 
XXX Not applicable 

NA Not available 

n.e.c. Not elsewhere classified 
kwh Kilowatt-hours 

D Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for 

individual companies 
S.I.C. Standard Industrial Classification 



Other abbreviations, such as lb., and bbl., are used in 
the customary sense. Where the term "tons" only is 
used, it refers to short tons of 2,000 pounds; where the 
figures are expressed in tons of 2,240 pounds, the unit 
of measure is specified as "long tons." 



GENERAL SUMMARY 

15 



GENERAL SUMMARY 17 

MINING EMPLOYMENT IN THE UNITED STATES 1860-1958 

W^M METAL MINING l-:-:':':-:v:-l OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION 

(NOT AVAILABLE FOR 1929) 

COAL MINING lllliii NONMETALLIC MINERALS MINING 



1000 



800 



3 600 



400 



200 




I860 1870 



1880 1889 



1902 1909 1919 

CENSUS YEAR 



1929 



1939 



1954 1958 



18 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 



Table 1— General Statistics for Mineral Operations 

(For explanation of oolunm captions see Introduction. For more detailed historical statistics, see table 1 of the General Summary 



Kind of operation and year 



Establishments, number 



With 
20 or more 
employees 



All employees 



Number 



Payroll 
($1,000) 



Production and development 
workers 



Number 



Man-hours 
(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Mineral industries only: 

1958 

195^ 

Including operations in manufactures: 
All operations: 

1958 

195^^" 

1959^ 

1919^ 

1909^ 

1902^-^ 

1889 

1880 

Excluding oil and gas extraction industries 

1958. 

19^^ 

1959^ 

1929 

1919^ 

1909^ 

1902-^-^ 

1889 

1880 



56,218 
37,it46 



,7ak 
,663 
,023 
,997 
,01? 
,088 

(MA) 
(NA) 



19,283 
21,078 

^13,79'^ 
10,996 
12,027 
16,815 

^20,352 

21,807 

7,595 



6,029 
6,19^ 



6,279 
6,l^56 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



3,589 
3,690 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



732,632 
785,708 



755,557 
805,968 
856,589 
1,062,641 
1,027,247 
621,81+6 
54-2,584 
295,991 



440,737 
^^90,233 
670,239 
865,551 
951,030 
9^,257 
59't,288 
513,361 
284,514 



3,740,288 
3,385,722 



3,826,692 

5,^56,979 

1,174,771 

1,455,681 

655,584 

'H6,795 

227,129 

94,772 



2,127,272 

1,99^*, 536 

856,389 

1,238,918 

1,286,405 

620,031 

395,476 

216,846 

87,593 



564,281 
647, i4i 



1,077,864 
1,243,898 



584,012 


1,116,774 


666,621 


1,288,461 


nk,^3o 


1,287,852 


987,184 


(NA) 


980,772 


(NA) 


^^581,985 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


370,077 


676,672 


'^31,138 


796,7*^5 


625,134 


1,022,824 


812,220 


(NA) 


895,525 


(NA) 


943,169 


(NA) 


^^559,5^7 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 



2,616,273 
2,572,297 



2,695,588 
2,639,378 

970,546 

1,504,409 

599,706 

376,218 

(NA) 

(NA) 



1,684,909 

1,662,783 

750, Ul 

1,099,895 

1,169,012 

571,612 

359,826 

(NA) 

(NA) 



NA Not available. 

■''For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufactui'ing establishments, includes the estimated value 
of minerals produced and used In the same establisliment in making manufactured products . 

^Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 

^Excludes the cost of natural gas processed at natural gas liquids plants, but includes the estimated value nrior to processing of liquids 
contained in such gas. See also footnote 2. 

'''For crushed and brokeii stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is 
included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

^Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



19 



in the United States: 1958 and Earlier Years 

report of the 195'* Census of Mineral Industries, Vol. I. For all years prior to 1959, excludes contract service operations) 







Selected 


expenses 








Energy 


used 








($1,000) 








(kwh equivalent) 




Value added 
in mining 










Value 

of net 

shipments 

and 
receipts^ 


Capital 
expenditures 








Supplies, 

purchases for 

resale, and 

purchased 

fuels and 


Minerals 
received for 
preparation 


Contract 
work 


Purchased 
machinery 
installed 


Total 


Per 

production 

worker 




($1,000) 


electricity 








($1,000) 


($1,000) 


(million) 


(1,000) 




15,581,1*9^ 


2,879,669 


1,750,1*51* 
^708,809 


1,85'*,770 


1,015,257 


^16,360,275 


2,797,810 


1*01*, 935 


718 


1 


=11,5^,1»18 


2,545,885 


1,826,738 


1,213,108 


^ll*,211,l*62 


2,725,756 


372,521* 


576 


2 


15,680,975 


*2,958,586 


1.758,580 
^710,521 


*1,855,630 


=1,017,571 


16,715,595 


=2,800,311* 


=1*05,1*11* 


691* 


5 


=ll,7'*0,05lt 


*2, 590,951 


''1,827,572 


=1,211*, 881 


2li*,i* 50,661* 


=2,725,665 


=575,126 


560 


1* 


2,765,596 


1*58,190 


(NA) 


210,568 


(NA) 


5,1*15,951* 


(NA) 


22l*,898 


291 


5 


2,587,956 


652,561* 


55,905 


82,259 


(NA) 


5,122,559 


(NA) 


^°250,155 


253 


6 


91*7,610 


250,792 


29,518 


50,690 


(NA) 


1,209,092 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


7 


556,961* 


192,262 


im) 


25,552 


(NA) 


772,558 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


8 


55l*,Ol*0 


85,551 


(NA) 


6,720 


(NA) 


1*26,511 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


9 


216,790 


51,1*1*7 


(HA) 


5,750 


(NA) 


251,967 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


10 


i*,6J*5,68i* 


*1,555,201 


765,991* 


*296,500 


=363,559 


6,059,565 


=610,579 


=95,101 


257 


11 


2i*,o66,56o 


^1,090,775 


^557,1*06 


*269,513 


=351,676 


=5,220,719 


=1*99,31*9 


=88,050 


201+ 


12 


1,1+29,122 


517,651 


(MA) 


7,550 


(NA) 


1,751*, 125 


(NA) 


77,131 


125 


15 


1,955,801* 


1*19,115 


(NA) 


17,911* 


86,733 


2,392,^1 


(NA) 


153,790 


165 


li* 


l,77l*,21i 


1*55,251 


7,091 


12,137 


(NA) 


2,219,579 


(NA) 


^°208,702 


23I* 


15 


855,7^ 


181*, 26I* 


19,1*29 


13,51*7 


(NA) 


1,055,561* 


(NA) 


(NA) 


I.NA) 


16 


1*97,91*2 


167,297 


(NA) 


5,051* 


(NA) 


670,295 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


17 


518,722 


62,861 


(NA) 


6,720 


(NA) 


388,305 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


18 


199,095 


28,275 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


227,366 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


19 



Except for value of shipments and value added, excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction with quarries. The value 
added in dressing stone at such operations was $7,915 thousand; this value has been incliided in the value of shipments and value added in mining. 

Represents number of mines and quarries, number of natural gas liquids plants, number of crude petroleum and natural gas establishments, and for 
mining seirvices. industries, number of operating companies. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel operations and for stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime plants . In 1929, there were 957 such 
sand and gravel establishments, with products valued at $102,512 thousand, and 252 such stone quarries, with products valued at $51,032 thousand. 
See also footnote 15 . 

■'■°Excludes purchased electricity. For "All operations" in 1959, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to only 3 percent of the total 
kv,-h equivalent of energy used; and for "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries" in 1929, "to only 1* percent. 

■'■■'■ Includes data for lime plants producing lime valued at $9,536 thousand. Excludes data for sand, gravel, common clay, and shale mining operations 
and for stone quarries at cement plants . 

^Figijres for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 
■"^Excludes data for common clay and shale operations. In 1959, tliere were 609 such mines with products valued at $6,31*1 thousand. 



20 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 



Table 2— Detailed Statistics for Mineral Operations in 

{For explariation of column 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group and industry 



Number 

of 
operat- 
ing 
com- 
panies 



Establishments, number 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ployees 



Includ- 
ing 
mining 
opera- 
tions 



Includ- 
ing 

prepara- 
tion 
plants 



Value 

of 

shipments 

and 
receipts 

($1,000) 



Value 

of net 

shipments 

and 

receipts 

($1,000) 



Value 
added in 
mining 



($1,000) 



Number of persons engaged 



Produc- 
tion and 
develop- 
ment 
workers 



ployees 



Proprietors and 
firm members 



Per- 
forming 
manual 
labor 



Man-hours 
worked by 
production 

and 
develop- 
ment 
workers 
(1,000) 



1011 
1021 



lOJl 



lOlt- 
1011.2 
lOUj 
lOltlt 

1051 

106 
1062 
1064 
1069 

108 
1081 

1082 

109 
1092 
1093 
1094 
1099 

11 

nil 
1112 
1115 



1211 
1212 
1215 

1214 

15 
1311 



1321 

138 
1381 
1382 

1389 



14U 



All mineral operations. 



Mineral Industries 

Included in manufactures 



MAJOR INDUSTRY GROUPS 



Metal mining 

Anthracite mining 

Bituminous coal and lignite 

mining 

Oil and gas extraction 



Nonmetallic minerals mining. 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures.. 



INDUSTRIES 
Metal mining 



Iron ores . . . 
Copper ores. 



Lead and zinc ores. 

Lead ores 

Zinc ores 



Gold and silver ores. 

Lode gold 

Placer gold 

Silver ores 



Bauxite . 



Ferroalloy ores 

Manganese ores 

Tungsten ores 

Ferroalloy ores , nee . 



Metal mining services 

Metal mining stripping 
services 

Metal mining services, nee. 



Miscellaneous metal ores 

Mercury ores 

Titanium ores 

Uranium-radium- vanadium ores . . 
Metallic ores j nee 



Anthracite mining. 



Anthracite 

Anthracite stripping services... 
Anthracite mining services, nee. 

Bituminous coal and lignite 
mining 



Bituminous coal 

Lignite 

Coal stripping services, nee. 
Coalmining services, nee... 



Oil and gas extraction. 



Crude petroleum and natural gas. 

Crude petrolexim 

Natural gas 



Natural gas liq.uids. 



Oil and gas field services . . . . 
Drilling oil and gas wells . . 
Oil and gas exploration 

services 

Oil and gas field services, 
nee 



Nonmetallic minerals mining . 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures . . 



Dimension stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures . 



Dimension limestone 

Mineral subindustry 

Included in manufactures . 



Dimension granite 

Mineral subindustry 

Included in manufactures . . 



See footnotes at end of table. 



31,850 

30,731 

1,200 



1,906 

1,157 

6,300 
15,363 

7,236 
6,137 
1,200 



1,906 

127 
112 

226 
I9I* 
42 

375 

242 
73 
60 

12 

286 

182 
52 
75 

91 

29 
62 



77 

9 

563 

66 

1,157 

1,075 
78 
6 



6,300 

6,102 

53 

137 

20 

15,363 

9,^5 
8,764 
1,241 

176 

5,682 
2,911 

329 

2,456 

7,236 
6,137 
1,200 

504 
306 

208 

120 
65 

55 

114 
63 

56 



37,784 

36,218 
1,566 



2,235 
1,248 

6,930 
18,501 

8,872 
7,306 
1,566 



2,233 

242 
148 

288 

211 

77 

379 

244 
74 
61 

29 

294 
186 
32 

76 



29 
66 

758 
79 
11 

602 
66 

1,248 

1,163 
79 



6,930 

6,715 

58 

137 

20 

18,501 

11,993 
10,603 
1,390 

593 

5,915 

3,064 

347 

2,504 

8,872 
7,306 
1,566 

557 
335 

222 

124 
68 
56 

137 
76 

61 



6,279 

6,029 

250 



583 
159 

1,371 
2,689 

1,677 

1,427 

250 



385 

129 
38 

52 

26 

26 

2f. 

12 
3 
5 



159 



117 

42 



1,371 

1,342 
8 
19 
2 

2,689 

1,092 
974 
118 

290 

1,307 
820 

76 

411 

1,677 

1,427 

250 

119 

26 

93 

27 
8 
19 

45 

9 

36 



31,130 

29,564 
1,566 



2,056 
1,065 

6,561 
12,716 

8,732 
7,166 
1,566 



2,056 

232 

l4o 

275 

204 

71 

577 
242 

74 
61 



277 
176 
28 

73 



XXX 
XXX 

732 
78 

10 
58e 
62 

1,065 

1,065 

XXX 



6,561 

6,503 
58 

XXX 
XXX 

12,716 

11,993 

10,603 

1,390 



723 
592 

3 

128 

8,732 
7,166 
1,566 

557 
335 
222 

124 
68 
56 

137 
76 
61 



8,619 

8,397 
222 



1,^1 
593 

5,405 

5,183 

222 



123 
36 

69 

42 
27 

132 
51 
74 

7 



XXX 
XXX 

122 

72 

U 

30 

9 



XXX 
XXX 



1,831 
1,807 

24 

XXX 
XXX 

593 

XXX 
XXX 
XXX 

593 

XXX 

XXX 



5,405 
5,183 

222 

231 

9 
222 

60 
4 

56 

62 

1 
61 



^18,450,826 



18 



360,992 



1,835,845 
325,128 

2,423,361 
11,636,887 

^2,229,605 

1,868,615 

360,992 



1,835,845 
681,958 

457,644 

120,561 
75,603 
44,958 

48,389 

29,506 

6,326 

12,557 

18,174 

111,521 
39,385 
14,430 
57,706 

32,584 

10,270 
22,114 

565,254 
8,607 
17,158 

356,451 
5,018 

525,128 

290,542 

54,465 

523 



2,425,561 

2,590,677 
11,035 
19,162 
2,487 

11,656,887 

8,385,906 

7,809,898 

576,008 

1,625,098 

1,625,883 
904,959 

87,215 
653,729 

^2,229,605 

1,868,613 

^360,992 

89,461 
15,864 
73,597 

20,417 
4,174 
16,243 

54,408 

5,577 

28,851 



^16,715,395 

16,360,273 
^55,122 



1,571,191 

234,000 

2,091,428 
10,656,052 

^2,162,744 
1,807,622 

^55,122 



1,571,191 
635,388 

374,428 

103,843 
68,144 
35,699 

46,981 

28,234 

6,526 

12,421 

17,57"* 

106,435 
34,330 
14,430 
57,675 

52,384 

10,270 
22,114 

254,558 

(D) 

16,531 

226,999 
(D) 

234,000 

199,214 

34,463 
323 



2,091,428 

2,058,794 
11,055 
19,130 
2,469 

10,656,032 

8,584,586 

7,808,607 

575,979 

706,915 

1,564,531 
902,721 

86,108 

575,702 

^2,162,744 

1,807,622 

^55,122 

83,446 
15,719 
67,727 

19,592 
4,174 
15,4l8 

31,450 

5,517 

25,913 



13,680,973 

15,581,494 
299,479 



1,187,527 
164,489 

1,609,964 
9,035,289 

1,685,904 

1,384,425 

299,479 



1,187,327 

500,252 
266,485 

73,679 
48,023 
25,656 

37,896 
22,659 
4,875 
10,564 

15,430 

7'*,255 

20,014 

8,164 

46,077 

22,862 

8,472 
14,590 

196,488 
7,093 
12,746 

174,802 
1,847 

164,489 

142,198 

22,027 

264 



1,609,964 

1,585,5^1 
9,309 
13,409 
1,705 

9,035,289 

7,339,922 

6,825,528 

516,594 

587,580 

1,107,787 
587,440 

64,355 

455,994 

1,683,904 

1,384,425 

299,479 

67,151 
13,076 
54,055 

16,386 
3,7'*1 
12,645 

24,315 

4,085 

20,250 



790,364 

769,459 
20,905 



94,349 
24,676 

195,017 
333,185 

143,137 
122,252 
20,905 



94,549 

31,706 
27,746 

11,459 
7,057 
4,382 

4,267 
2,780 

441 
1,046 

712 

5,776 

2,308 

657 

2,811 

2,269 

584 
1,685 

10,434 

730 

962 

8,446 

296 

24,676 

21,507 

3,ll4 

55 



195,017 

192,747 

567 

1,461 

242 

333,185 

194,321 
177,139 
17,182 

16,566 

122,298 
62,617 

9,856 

49,845 

145,137 
122,252 
20,905 

12,519 
2,575 
9,944 

2,688 

640 

2,048 

3,9't2 

785 

3,157 



584,012 

564,281 
19,731 



71,402 
20,047 

165,533 
213,955 

115,095 
95,564 
19,731 



71,402 

23,659 
20,898 

8,728 
5,460 
3,268 

5,4ll 

2,254 

523 

854 

502 

4,380 

1,792 

508 

2,080 

1,973 

505 

1,468 

7,851 
569 
706 

6,389 
187 

20,047 

17,266 

2,737 

44 



163,533 

161,711 

437 

1,180 

205 

213,935 

102,445 
92,358 

10,087 

15,445 

98,045 
52,274 

7,559 
58,212 

115,095 
95,564 
19,731 

10,825 
2,055 
8,770 

2,330 

491 

1,^9 

5,465 

681 

2,784 



^169,525 

168,351 

^1,174 



21,099 
2,766 

24,173 



^22,622 
21,448 
^1,174 



21,099 

7,917 
6,744 

2,499 
1,423 
1,076 

528 

352 

41 

135 

203 

1,058 
307 
130 
621 

211 

48 
163 

1,939 

83 

256 

1,550 
50 

2,766 

2,446 

317 

3 



24,173 

25,965 
73 
120 
15 



77,595 

72,365 

5,230 

3,069 

18,201 
7,137 

1,998 

9,066 

^22,622 
21,448 
^1,174 

1,425 

251 

1,174 

301 

92 

209 

432 

59 

375 



=36,827 

36,827 
(NA) 



1,848 
1,863 

7,311 
20,385 

=5,420 

5,420 

(NA) 



150 
104 

212 
174 
38 

328 
194 
77 
57 



338 

209 

19 

110 



644 
78 



507 
59 



1,795 
60 



7,311 

7,071 

57 

161 

22 

20,585 

14,281 
12,4l6 
1,865 



6,052 
5,206 

279 

2,567 

=5,420 

5,420 

(NA) 

=269 
269 
(NA) 

= 57 

57 

(NA) 

=45 

45 

(NA) 



H6,042 

16,042 
(NA) 



1,190 
1,298 

3,785 
6,918 

=2,851 

2,851 

(NA) 



1,190 
85 



l4l 
108 
33 

24l 

11*5 

56 

40 



206 

128 
9 



22 
28 

394 
62 

291 

41 

1,298 

1,255 
42 
5 



5,785 

3,629 
38 
101 

17 
6,918 

3,984 

5,658 

526 



2,926 
1,546 

127 

l,'t53 

=2,851 

2,851 

(NA) 

= 175 
175 
(NA) 

=38 

38 

(NA) 

=24 

24 

(NA) 



1,116,774 

1,077,864 
58,910 



136,750 
50,867 

267,699 
440,102 

241,556 
202,446 
58,910 



156,750 

41,737 
41,021 

16,734 
10,397 
6,337 

7,071 

4,602 

723 

1,746 

905 

8,335 

3,475 

977 

3,883 

4,274 

1,013 
3,261 

16,673 
1,223 
1,254 

13,873 
3'*3 

30,867 

26,409 

4,395 

63 



267,699 

264,308 

844 

2,106 

441 

440,102 

200,930 
181,246 
19,684 

26,947 

212,225 
109,470 

16,695 

86,060 

241,356 
202,446 
38,910 

20,679 
3,690 
16,989 

4,201 

879 

3,522 

6,731 
1,277 
5,454 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



21 



the United States, by Industry Group and Industry; I95.S 

captions see Introduction) 



Prinolpul axpenaes designated below ($1,000) | 




Capital oxpendlturos 


($1,000) 




Energy 
used 

(million 
liwli 
equiv- 
alent ) 




Total 


Wages aiid 


salaries 


Ulnerals 
received 

for 
prepara- 
tion 


Supplies 

and 
purchases 

for 
resale 


Purchased 
fuels 


Purchased 
elec- 
tricity 


Contract 
work 


Purchased 
moclilnery 
Installed 

($1,000) 


Total 


Develop- 
ment and 
explora- 
tion of 
mineral 
property 


Prepara- 
tion 
plant and 

other 
construc- 
tion 


New 
machinery 

ojid 
equipment 


Uucd 
plojit 

and 
equip- 
ment 




Production 

and 
developinent 
workers 


Other 
employees 


Ind. 
code 


10,379,288 


2,695,588 


=1,151,104 


1,758,580 


*2, 460,250 


"275,732 


*202,604 


"1,855,650 


=1,017,571 


=2,800,514 


^1,140,198 


=466,585 


=1,095,225 


'■98,506 


=4o5,4l4 




10,231,181 
lli8,107 


2,616,273 
79,515 


1,124,015 
^7,089 


1,756,454 
1,926 


2,405,671 
"56,579 


274,945 
*789 


201,055 
"1,549 


1,854.770 
*86o 


1,015,257 
=2,314 


2,797,810 
=2,504 


1,140,198 
(NA) 


466.578 
*207 


1,095,140 
^2,085 


98.094 
=212 


404,955 
^1*79 




1,281, 06U 
260,5» 


556,209 

79,425 


151,577 
15,971 


5(^,251 
85,575 


282,406 
29,950 


57,986 
4,062 


57,250 
7,325 


132,405 
40,505 


69,531 
10,033 


214,291 
16,591 


44,228 
3,818 


97,647 
1,879 


65,298 
9,683 


7,118 
1,211 


27,383 
3,881 


10 
11 


1,762,1*21 
5,^6,521 


760,564 
1,010,679 


152,420 
688,741 


325,224 
992,586 


575,569 
1,401,400 


25,556 
150,652 


56,676 

53,553 


70,632 
1,559,550 


151,955 
654,232 


188,195 
2,189,735 


9,058 
1,075,515 


66,665 
259,739 


101,219 
796,001 


11,255 
58,682 


14,903 
310,315 


12 
15 


1,2}8,689 

1,090,582 

l'»8,107 


488,911 

409,596 

79,515 


=144,595 
157,506 
^7,089 


52,144 
50,218 
1,926 


"572,945 
516,566 
"56,579 


"79,496 

78/707 

*789 


"48,040 
46,491 
"1,549 


"52,758 

51,898 

"860 


=131,820 

129,506 

2,314 


=191,502 
188,998 
=2,504 


=7,781 

7,781 

(NA) 


=40,657 

40.450 

=207 


=125,024 
120,959 
=2,085 


=20,040 

19,828 

=212 


=48,934 

48455 

^479 


14 


1,281, 06i» 


356,209 


151,577 


505,251 


282,406 


57,986 


57,250 


132,405 


69,551 


214,291 


44,228 


97,647 


65,298 


7,118 


27,383 


10 


580,326 
560,31*3 


120,618 
106,557 


55,769 
57,144 


64,662 
89,011 


80,520 
86,587 


17,447 
9,744 


14,000 
9,476 


29,510 
22,024 


18,516 
19,191 


42,749 
44,874 


10,913 
9,720 


11,944 
14,835 


18,675 
16,554 


1,217 
3,785 


11,106 
10,259 


1011 
1021 


106,978 
6l»,205 
'•2,775 


59,001 

24,843 
14,158 


15,596 
8,916 
6,480 


21,517 
11,555 
10,164 


21,185 
12,996 
8,189 


1,058 
609 
449 


5,869 
5,580 
2,489 


2,952 

2,108 

844 


2,920 
1,630 
1,290 


8,619 
4,496 
4,123 


4,160 
2,295 
1,865 


1,845 

1,002 

845 


2,502 
1,113 
1,589 


112 
86 
26 


1,153 
659 


1031 


52,555 

20,258 

5, ''70 

8,805 


17,064 
10,709 
1,515 
4,840 


2,950 

1,758 

275 

917 


1,090 

XXX 


8,258 
^5,917 

1,070 
^2,561 


868 

577 

94 

197 


1,658 
890 
451 
337 


665 

427 

85 

153 


1,178 
764 
113 
501 


5,224 

1,728 
340 

1,156 


1,181 
470 

65 

646 


962 
505 
91 

368 


766 
535 
115 
116 


515 

220 

69 

26 


528 

547 

71 

110 


104 
1042 
1045 
1044 


6,275 


2,290 


1,316 


1,066 


728 


258 


172 


445 


1,4^ 


1,408 


24 


107 


1,247 


30 


151 


1051 


68,564 

29,512 

9,197 

29,655 


19,455 
7,244 
1,995 

10,218 


7,256 

1,792 

9l4 

4,550 


15,570 

10,675 

4,664 

51 


15,817 
5,216 
1,385 
9,216 


1,671 

1,101 

17 
553 


2,265 
677 
217 

1,569 


6,552 

2,807 

7 

5,718 


2,158 

1,085 

98 

975 


6,545 

2,190 

122 

l*,255 


1,503 

469 

17 

817 


2,655 

255 

32 

2,370 


2,094 

1,113 

56 

925 


493 

555 

17 

121 


922 
582 
25 
315 


106 

1062 

1064 

1069 


21,517 


10,624 


1,475 


XXX 


7,657 


1,271 


60 


452 


1,565 


1,265 


XXX 


34 


1,155 


74 


540 


108 


'*,512 
17,205 


2,557 
8,267 


515 
1,158 


XXX 
XXX 


972 
6,685 


494 
777 


51 
9 


125 
509 


1,015 
552 


855 

4o8 


XXX 
XXX 


(^) 
(^) 


805 
550 


«50 
«58 


145 
197 


1081 
1082 


5011,728 
5,118 
9,560 

287,5'*'' 
2,506 


40,800 
2,627 
2,882 

54,459 
852 


12,2» 

485 

l,6l4 

9,985 

211 


110,555 

109,452 
( = ) 


61,854 
=1,462 
=3,252 
57,027 
=1,196 


5,669 
587 
614 

4,525 
145 


5,752 
102 

1,077 

2,505 

48 


69,845 
55 
121 

69,615 
56 


22,720 

570 

1,851 

20,092 
427 


105,609 

862 

2,485 

101,565 
699 


16,927 
290 

59 

16,499 

99 


65,265 
151 
329 

64,578 
227 


22,525 

552 

2,115 

19,660 

198 


1,092 
89 

828 
175 


2,944 
129 
426 

2,344 
45 


109 

1092 

10» 

1094 
1099 


260,595 


79,425 


15,971 


85,575 


29,950 


4,062 


7,525 


40,505 


10,055 


16,591 


5,818 


1,879 


9,685 


1,211 


5,881 


n 


254,1014. 

26,225 

266 


67,449 

11,780 

196 


12,024 

1,»7 

10 


85,575 

XXX 
XXX 


20,777 

9,101 

52 


2,546 

1,708 

8 


6,8l4 

511 


59,319 
1,186 


6,517 

3,615 

101 


12,804 

3,685 

102 


5,818 

XXX 
XXX 


1,811 
68 


6,553 
3,349 

1 


842 
268 
101 


5,547 

526 

8 


1111 

1112 

1115 


1,762,1*21 


760,164 


152,420 


525,224 


575,569 


23, S6 


56,676 


70,652 


151,955 


188,195 


9,058 


66,665 


101,219 


11,255 


14,905 


12 


l,7i*'*,569 

l*,329 

11,910 

1,815 


751,584 

2,261 

5,615 

904 


151,175 
452 

758 

55 


525,224 

XXX 
XXX 


568,722 

1,155 

5,005 

7U 


21,628 

210 

1,612 

86 


56,509 
260 
107 


69,727 

33 

815 

57 


147,495 
1,522 
2,816 

124 


183,967 

1,432 

2,600 

196 


8,984 
74 

XXX 
XXX 


66,462 

69 

130 

2 


97,783 

1,256 

2,006 

194 


10,758 

53 

464 


14,505 
111 
467 
22 


1211 
1212 
1213 

1214 


5,^6,521 


1,010,679 


688,741 


992,586 


1,401,400 


150,652 


»,553 


1,559,550 


654,252 


2,189,755 


1,075,313 


259,739 


796,001 


58,682 


510,515 


15 


5,51*5,61*2 

3,216,1*95 

529,11*7 


497,571 

452,947 

44,624 


544,615 
512,911 
51,704 


XXX 
XXX 

XXX 


951,911 
832,555 
119,556 


56,204 
53,0^ 
3,121 


45,770 

44,627 

1,145 


1,449,571 

1,520,572 

129,199 


486,021 
443,166 
42,855 


1,945,4® 

1,707,255 

256,260 


1,062,206 
955,699 
126,507 


197,674 
150,227 

47,447 


646,589 
586,948 

59,441 


37,224 

54,359 

2,865 


137,440 

128,265 

9,175 


1511 


1,188,951 


75,759 


20,580 


992,586 


46,026 


4,521 


4,696 


44,985 


39,836 


94,950 


XXX 


53,566 


40, 441 


925 


142,130 


1321 


1,101,91*8 
624,505 


437,569 
259,528 


125,546 
49,915 


XXX 
XXX 


405,465 
241,491 


69,927 
40,942 


2,867 
1,261 


64,776 
51,566 


128,575 
84,457 


151,312 
102,018 


15,107 

12,953 


8,499 
3,322 


109,171 
68,149 


20,535 
17,594 


50,745 
22,617 


138 

1381 


67,518 


51,115 


12,554 


XXX 


16,596 


5,555 


295 


5,645 


6,075 


7,oee 




554 


6,207 


521 


949 


1382 


1*10,127 


166,926 


61,097 


XXX 


145,576 


25,450 


1,511 


9,767 


57,843 


42,212 


154 


4,625 


54,815 


2,620 


7,177 


1589 


1,258,689 

i,09o,5fie 
11*8,107 


488,911 

409,596 

79,515 


^144,595 
157,506 
=7,089 


52,144 
50,218 
1,926 


"372,945 
316,566 
"56,?r9 


"79,496 

78,707 

^789 


"48,040 
46,491 
"1,549 


"52,758 

51,898 

*86o 


=151,820 
129,506 
=2,5l4 


=191,502 
188,998 
=2,504 


=7,781 

7,781 

(NA) 


=40,657 

40.450 

=207 


=125,024 
120,939 
=2,085 


=20,040 

19,828 

*212 


=48,994 

48455 

^479 


14 


68,101 
10,579 
57,522 


36,768 

6,067 

50,701 


8,145 
1,054 
7,089 


1,926 
1,926 


16,860 
2,252 
14,608 


1,193 
4o4 
789 


1,971 
422 

1,549 


1,240 
380 
860 


2,845 

551 

2,514 


5,705 
1,201 

2,504 


352 

52 

(NA) 


566 
359 
207 


2,787 

702 

2,085 


500 
88 
212 


614 
135 
479 


l4ll 


15,001 
2,761 
12,21*0 


8,857 
1,592 
7,245 


1,902 
528 

1,574 


150 
150 


5,051 

585 

2,666 


276 
87 
189 


406 

78 

528 


599 

91 

508 


846 
294 
552 


1,077 
502 
575 


^15 

15 

(NA) 


90 
70 
20 


855 
588 
467 


117 
29 

88 


169 
53 
136 




25,852 
3,908 

21,941* 


12,645 
2,046 
10,599 


2,978 

242 

2,756 


478 
478 


8,060 
1,295 
6,767 


485 
115 
570 


896 
171 
725 


510 
4l 
269 


582 

89 

495 


718 
217 
501 


=32 

52 

(NA) 


78 
51 
27 


554 
122 
452 


54 

12 
42 


247 
58 
209 





22 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 



ible 2— Detailed Statistics for Mineral Operations in the 

(For explanation of coluirui 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group and industry 



Number 

of 
operat- 
ing 
com- 
panies 



Establishments J number 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ployees 



Includ- 
ing 
mining 
opera- 
tions 



Includ- 
ing 

prepara- 
tion 
plants 



Value 

of 

shipments 

and 

receipts 

($1,000) 



Value 

of net 

shipments 

and 

receipts 

($1,000) 



Value 
added in 
mining 

($1,000) 



Number of persons engaged 



Produc- 
tion and 
develop- 
ment 
workers 



ployees 



Proprietors and 
firm roerabers 



Per- 
forming 
manual 
labor 



Man-hours 
worked by 
production 
and 
develop- 
ment 
workers 
(1,000) 



Itel 



ifflU 



11*53 



11+55 
11+56 
11+57 



11+59 



ll+7 
11+72 
11+73 
1I+7I+ 
11+75 
11+76 
11+77 
1I+79 



1I+8 
11+81 
ll+8s 



11+9 



11+92 



11+93 
11+91+ 
11*95 
11+96 
11+97 
11+98 
11+99 



INDUSTRIES — Oont inued 

Dimension stone — Continued 

Dimension stone, nee 

Mineral sublndustry 

Included In manufactures.... 

Crushed and broken stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures 

Crushed and broken limestone . . 

Mineral sublndustry 

Included in manufactures . . . . 

Crushed and broken granite, 
mineral sublndustry 

Crushed and broken stone, nee. 

Mineral sublndustry 

Included in manuf actxires .... 

Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures 

Common sand and gravel 

Mineral sublndustry 

Included In manufactures .... 

Glass sand 

Molding sand 

Clay and related minerals 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures 

Bentonlte 

Fire clay 

Mineral Industry 

Included in manufactures .... 

Fuller • s earth 

Kaolin and ball clay 

Feldspar 

Magnesite and brucite 

Clay and related minerals, 
nee 

Mineral industry 

Included In manufactures .... 

Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

Barlte 

Fluorspar 

Potash, soda, borate minerals. 

Phosphate rock 

Rock salt 

Sulfur 

Chemical-fertilizer raining, 
nee 

Nonmetallic minerals services . . . 
Nonmetallic minerals stripping 
Nonme-tallic services , nee 

Miscellaneous minerals , nee 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures ...... 

Gypsum 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures .... 

Mica 

Native asphalt and bitumens... 

P\jmlce and pumiclte 

Talc, soapstone, pyrophyllite . 
Natural abrasives, except sand 

Peat 

Nonmetallic minerals , nee 



272 

178 

99 

1,680 

1,597 

111 

1,252 
1,176 

10I+ 



87 

352 

331+ 
18 

3,690 

3,350 

371 

3,553 
3,215 

371 



396 



29 

235 

136 
10I+ 

13 

1+1 
61+ 
1+ 



525 
109 
1+39 

207 
1+1 
50 
19 
1+3 
18 
11+ 

28 

71+ 
1+6 
28 

1+39 
1+32 



1I+2 
8 
63 
1+3 
20 
80 
1+7 



296 
191 
105 

2,176 

1,957 

219 

1,656 
1,1+58 



399 

378 
21 

i+,08l+ 

3,703 
381 

3,915 

3,551* 

381 

1*5 
12I+ 

1,202 
1+90 
712 

1+1 



135 

11+ 
53 
71* 
1+ 



699 
122 
577 

271 
53 
55 
21 
65 
22 
21+ 

31 

75 
1+7 
28 

507 
1+75 
32 

61+ 
32 
32 

14 9 
10 
61+ 
61+ 
20 

81 

55 



1+7 

9 

38 

71+1 

61+4 

97 

581 

484 



509 
482 
27 

474 
447 
27 

19 
16 

129 

112 

17 

15 

28 
19 
9 

6 
26 
10 

3 



296 
191 
105 

2,152 

1,953 

219 

1,639 

1,441 
198 



392 

371 

21 

4,071 

3,690 

381 

3,905 

3,524 

381 

42 
124 

1,202 
490 
712 

41 

317 
182 
135 

14 
53 

74 
4 



699 
122 
577 

243 
52 
51 
21 
52 
22 
24 



XXX 
XXX 
XXX 

507 

475 

32 

64 
32 
32 

l49 
10 
64 
64 
20 
81 
55 



109 

4 

105 

1,813 
1,813 

XXX 

1,387 
1,387 

XXX 



318 

318 

XXX 

2,758 
2,758 



2,618 

2,6l8 

XXX 

39 

101 

183 



25 

31 

51 

XXX 

11 
43 
12 
3 



170 
35 

27 
17 
44 
21 
5 



XXX 

XXX 
XXX 

250 
250 

XXX 

19 
19 

XXX 

56 

9 

28 
23 
16 

60 
39 



34,636 

6,113 

28,525 

^754,809 
616,076 
^138,733 

^596,356 
459,037 
'■137,319 



49,596 

^108,857 
107,443 
^l,4l4 

^631,485 
560,806 
^70,679 

^586,769 
516,090 
^70,679 

28,343 
16,373 

^173,597 
122,738 
"■50,859 

16,843 

^32,944 
18,606 
^14,338 

8,692 

42,434 

6,889 

7,270 



^58,525 
22,004 
^6,521 

464,612 
13,768 
19,977 

l4l,ll5 

132,094 
4i,8l3 

106,202 

9,643 

7,934 
4,787 
5,147 

^107,707 
80,583 
^27,124 

"■34,172 

7,048 

"27,124 

6,221 
8,04l 
5,002 

14,908 
3,373 
4,379 

31,611 



32,424 

6,028 

26,396 

"•741,058 
602,305 
"138,733 

"■584,179 
446,860 
"137,319 



49,391 

^107,468 
106,054 
"l,4l4 

"■622,885 
552,206 
"^70,679 

"578,555 

508,256 

70,679 

(D) 
(D) 

"172,551 
121,692 
"50,859 

(D) 

"52,759 
18,421 

"14,338 

(D) 

(D) 

6,433 

7,270 



(D) 

"36,521 

427,472 

(D) 

16,639 

(D) 

99,109 

(D) 

106,202 

(D) 

7,934 
4,787 
3,l47 

"107,418 
80,294 
"■27,124 

"34,172 

7,048 

"27,124 

6,216 
8,o4l 
5,002 

(D) 
5,573 
4,370 

(D) 



26,430 

5,250 

21,180 

562,435 
445,788 
116,647 

449,736 
334,368 
115,368 



33,493 

79,206 
77,927 
1,279 

497,864 

434,468 

63,396 

465,096 

401,700 

63,396 

20,672 
12,096 

128,954 
87,368 
41,586 

12,220 

25,848 
l4,54o 
11,308 

5,955 

30,990 

4,531 

5,978 



43,432 
13,154 
30,278 

335,153 

11,321 
12,653 
111,082 
64,375 
34,075 
94,063 

7,586 

6,217 
3,780 
2,437 

86,150 
62,355 
23,795 

29,753 

5,958 

23,795 

4,974 
5,954 
4,058 

11,755 
2,648 
3,640 

23,368 



5,889 
1,150 
4,739 

47,708 
42,727 
4,981 

37,396 
32,496 
4,900 



3,34l 

6,971 

6,890 

81 

42,546 
40,005 
2,541 

39,574 

37,033 

2,54l 

1,642 
1,530 

11,619 
9,045 
2,574 

709 

2,400 

1,595 

805 

659 

3,412 
619 
338 



3,482 
1,715 
1,769 

20,699 
962 
1,301 
6,664 
5,420 
1,991 
3,679 



676 
512 

6,858 
5,9» 



1,291 
426 
865 

916 
468 
350 

1,528 
245 
448 

1,812 



5,030 

883 

4,l47 

59,846 

34,865 

4,981 

31,272 

26,372 

4,900 

2,906 

5,668 

5,587 

81 

55,171 

30,650 

2,54l 

30,809 
28,268 
2,541 

1,339 
1,023 

9,872 
7,298 
2,574 

543 

2,084 

1,279 

805 

527 

2,722 

496 

267 



3,233 
1,464 
1,769 

14,852 
781 
1,044 
4,590 
3,955 
1,602 
2,303 

557 

1,037 
588 
449 

5,512 

4,647 

865 

1,219 
354 
865 

649 
367 
271 

1,123 
204 
335 

1,344 



692 
100 
592 

^6,539 

6,539 

(NA) 

25,036 

5,036 

(NA) 



403 

^1,100 
1,100 

(m) 

^6,418 

6,4l8 

(NA) 

^5,896 

5,896 

(NA) 



235 

^1,475 

1,475 

(NA) 

145 

^194 
194 
(NA) 

125 

672 

71 

70 



^198 
198 
(NA) 

5,724 
148 
191 

2,071 

1,438 
382 

1,574 



(MA) 

^52 

52 

(NA) 

78 
97 
45 

171 
25 
54 

447 



= 167 
167 
(NA) 

"1,323 

1,323 

(NA) 

H,088 

1,088 

(MA) 



32 

3 203 
203 
(NA) 

^2,957 

2,957 

(NA) 

=■2,869 
2,869 

(NA) 

14 
74 

^272 
272 
(NA) 



JJ22 
122 
(NA) 

7 
18 
52 

1 



=■51 

51 

(NA) 

143 
33 
66 
3 
27 
7 
2 



79 
50 
29 

^377 
377 
(NA) 

^20 

20 

(NA) 



■^113 
113 
(NA) 

^611 
6U 
(NA) 

^499 
499 
(NA) 



(NA) 

"1,592 

1,592 

(NA) 

"1,536 

1,556 

(NA) 



3 146 
146 
(NA) 



359 

59 
(NA) 



^30 

30 

(NA) 

66 
19 
27 

'14 
4 



44 
29 
15 

^217 
217 
(NA) 

3 10 

10 

(NA) 

11-5 

12 

17 

8 

47 



9,747 
1,^4 
8,215 

85,594 

75,632 

9,962 

66,912 

57,112 

9,800 



6,442 
12,240 

12,078 

162 
71,562 

66,480 
5,o8e 

66,815 

61,733 

5,o8e 

2,853 

l,9l4 

20,044 
14,897 
5,147 

l,l4o 

3,824 
2,214 
1,610 

1,145 

5,675 

1,028 

428 



6,8o4 
3,267 
3,537 

30,405 
1,588 
2,105 
9,212 
8,255 
5,508 
4,644 

1,09} 

1,893 
1,069 

824 

11,179 
9,449 
1,730 

2,506 

776 

1,730 

1,204 
732 
409 

2,289 
408 
613 

3,018 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. 
NA Not available, 

""For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of minerals produced and used 
in the same establishment in making manufactured products. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



23 



United States, by Industry Group and Industry; 1958— Continued 

oaptlona soo Introduotlon) 





Principal expenses designated below ($1,000) 


Capital expenditures ($1,000) 


Energy 
used 

(million 

kv/h 
equiv- 
alent) 




Total 


Wages and 


salaries 


Minerals 
received 

for 
prepara- 
tion 


Supplies 

and 
purchases 

for 
resale 


Purchased 
fuels 


Purcliased 
elec- 
tricity 


Contract 
work 


Purchased 
machinery 
InstaUed 

($1,000), 


Total 


Develop- 
ment and 
explora- 
tion of 
mineral 
property 


Prepara- 
tion 
plant and 

otlier 
construc- 
tion 


Now 
maclilnery 

and 
equipment 


Used 
plant 

and 
equip- 
ment 




Production 

and 

developioent 

workers 


Other 
employees 


Ind. 
code 


27,248 
3,910 
23,338 


15,286 

2,429 
12,857 


'it 
2,979 


1,318 

1,318 


5,7't? 

57^ 

5,175 


452 
202 
250 


669 
173 
496 


2^^ 
285 


1,417 
1,269 


1,910 

482 

1,428 


=5 

5 

(NA) 


398 
238 
160 


1,578 

192 

1,186 


129 
47 
82 


198 
64 
134 




421,398 
376,171 
45,227 


170,407 
147,266 
23,l4l 


^41,155 

41,135 

(NA) 


2,185 
2,185 

XXX 


*155,108 
133,022 
••22,086 


"21,809 

21,809 

(") 


*14,513 

lit.Sp 

(") 


*l6,24l 

16, 241 

(*) 


=51,238 

51,258 

(NA) 


=68,720 

68,720 

(NA) 


^1,959 

■ 1,959 

(NA) 


=16,161 

16,161 

(NA) 


=43,7-('2 

43,772 

(NA) 


=6,828 

6,828 

(NA) 


=8,307 

8,507 

(NA) 


1421 


328,2^ 

2^,467 

44,816 


154,120 
111,255 
22,865 


^32,105 

52,105 

(NA) 


2,056 
2,056 

XXX 


■'119,126 

97,175 

■'21,951 


"17,442 

17,442 

(") 


"10,881 

10,881 

(") 


"12,555 

12,555 

(") 


=38,894 

58,894 

(NA) 


=54,554 

5"*, 554 

(NA) 


^1,752 
1,752 

(NA) 


=12,411 

12,411 

(NA) 


=34,801 
54,801 

(NA) 


=5,570 

5,370 

(NA) 


=6,878 

6,878 

(NA) 




27,9''3 


10,771 


2,204 




12,351 


674 


1,309 


634 


5,858 


4,703 


61 


948 


5,510 


384 


384 




65,172 

64,761 

411 


25,516 
25,240 

276 


^6,828 

6,£E8 

(NA) 


129 
129 

XXX 


*25,651 

25,496 

*155 


"5,695 

5,6« 

(") 


"2,325 

2,523 

(") 


"5,052 

5,052 

(") 


=6,506 

6,506 

(NA) 


=9,683 

9,683 

(NA) 


2 146 
146 
(NA) 


=2,802 
2,802 

(NA) 


=5,661 

5,661 

(NA) 


=1,074 

1,074 

(NA) 


=1,045 

1,045 

(NA) 




335,059 

3l6,7?7 

18,502 


145,460 
134,441 
11,019 


=57,885 

57,885 

(NA) 


870 
870 

XXX 


^96,056 
88,753 
"7,2® 


"25,542 

25,542 

(") 


"14,099 

14,099 
(") 


"15,567 

15,567 

(") 


=38,469 

58,469 

(NA) 


=56,562 

56,562 

(NA) 


^1,842 

1,842 

(NA) 


=14,894 

14,894 

(NA) 


=28,975 

28,975 

(NA) 


=10,851 

10,851 

(NA) 


=8,596 

8,596 

(NA) 


l44l 


309,717 

291,415 

18,502 


135,821 
124,802 
11,019 


=54,582 

54,582 

(NA) 


795 
795 

XXX 


''88,2» 
81,010 
"7,285 


"25,085 

23,085 

(") 


"12,471 
12,471 

n 


"14,672 
14,6J2 


=35,177 

55,177 

(NA) 


=52,818 

52,818 

(NA) 


=■1,808 

1,808 

(NA) 


=13,569 

15,569 

(NA) 


=26,634 

26,634 

(NA) 


=10,807 

10,807 

(NA) 


=7,249 

7,249 

(NA) 




15,5U 
9,8il 


5,730 
5,909 


1,767 
1,556 


(=) 
(=) 


=5,520 
=2,300 


1,265 
992 


1,084 
544 


145 
550 


2,360 
932 


2,705 
l,04l 


19 
15 


1,012 
515 


1,656 
685 


16 
28 


966 
581 




95,324 

75,380 

_ 19,944 


37,551 
26,880 
10,671 


=9,277 

9,277 

(NA) 


874 
874 

XXX 


"30,568 
21,295 
"9,275 


"9,605 

9,605 

(") 


"3,585 

5,585 

(") 


"5,864 

5,864 

(") 


=9,544 

9,544 

(NA) 


=13,197 

13,197 

(NA) 


^755 
753 
(NA) 


=5,485 

5,485 

(NA) 


=8,498 

8,498 

(NA) 


=461 
461 
(NA) 


=5,477 

5,477 

(NA) 


11*5 


7,582 


1,996 


889 


(=) 


=2,406 


720 


390 


1,181 


1,009 


1,085 


125 


4 


946 


8 


576 


1452 


17,145 
10,498 
6,647 


8,606 
4,989 
3,617 


=1,051 

1,C51 

(NA) 


176 
176 

XXX 


"5,148 
2,118 
"3,030 


"1,090 

1,090 

(") 


"264 
264 
(") 


"850 
850 
(") 


=1,695 
1,695 

(NA) 


=2,107 

2,107 

(NA) 


=■189 
189 
(NA) 


=153 
155 
(NA) 


=1,562 

1,562 

(NA) 


=205 
205 
(NA) 


=582 
582 
(NA) 


1455 


5,452 

26,696 

4,306 

4,092 


1,675 
9,719 
1,515 
1,386 


726 

4,295 

4o4 

539 


(=) 
(=) 
456 


=1,754 
=8,759 
1,055 
1,010 


748 
2,157 

524 
794 


270 

1,194 

396 

220 


281 
592 
156 
145 


263 
2,915 
1,277 

114 


579 
4,151 
1,506 

989 


25 

330 

22 


231 

1,053 

208 

934 


321 

2,676 

1,053 

55 


2 
92 

25 


525 

1,455 

127 

591 


1454 
1455 
1456 
1457 


30,051 
16,754 
13,297 


12,656 
5,602 
7,054 


=1,595 

1,3» 

(NA) 


XXX 


"10,698 
4,455 

"6,245 


"5,772 
5,772 

n 


"851 

851 
(") 


*68l 
681 
(") 


^2,073 

2,075 

(NA) 


=2,982 

2,982 

(NA) 


=62 

62 

(NA) 


=902 
902 
(NA) 


=1,885 
1,885 

(NA) 


=155 
155 
(NA) 


=2,245 
2,245 
((NA) 


1459 


261,192 
6,571 
13,742 
75,557 
94,536 
19,218 
45,914 


74,527 
2,698 
4,556 

26,746 

17,185 
7,937 

13,267 


41,449 

704 

1,280 

14,321 

10,025 

5,059 
11,505 


46,019 

(=) 

5,338 

(=) 

41,864 
( = ) 


55,790 
^1,955 
2,504 
=22,643 
12,776 
=7,363 
7,365 


18,432 
281 
563 

7,144 

3,562 

311 

6,440 


11,641 
554 
594 
3,026 
6,729 
455 
45 


15,554 
381 
1,127 
1,677 
2,395 
95 
7,496 


25,573 
251 
764 
6,956 
6,095 
2,125 
7,077 


59,150 

975 

1,566 

11,595 
5,702 
2,607 

16,282 


2,139 
204 
627 
608 
426 
9 
(D) 


3,655 

426 
160 
1,557 
307 
480 
(D) 


32,684 

507 

702 

8,994 

4,916 

2,U8 
(D) 


652 
56 
77 

254 
55 

(D) 


24,464 

198 

579 

8,452 

3,120 

4l6 

11,819 


147 

1472 

1475 

1474 

1475 

1476 

1477 


5,654 


2,558 


757 


(=) 


=2,005 


151 


258 


165 


125 


607 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


(D) 


80 


1479 


5,387 
3,021 
2,366 


5,(^8 
1,656 
1,402 


484 
271 
215 


XXX 
XXX 
XXX 


1,289 
686 
603 


579 
259 
120 


51 
52 
19 


146 

137 

9 


700 
484 
216 


848 
591 
257 


XXX 
XXX 
XXX 


74 

22 
52 


705 
506 
199 


69 
65 
6 


105 
75 
52 


148 
1481 
l48e 


52,228 

45,116 

7,112 


21,160 
17,577 
3,785 


=6,022 

6,022 

(NA) 


270 
270 

XXX 


"17,294 
15,965 
"3,329 


"2,756 

2,736 

(") 


"2,180 

2,180 

(") 


"2,566 

2,566 

(") 


=5,851 

5,851 

(NA) 


=9,540 

9,540 

(NA) 


= 1,036 

1,036 

(NA) 


=1,822 

1,822 

(NA) 


= 5,603 

5,603 

(NA) 


=879 
879 
(NA) 


=1,571 

1,371 

(NA) 


l49 


10,249 

3,137 

7,112 


5,264 
1,481 
5,7® 


=524 
524 
(NA) 


XXX 


"4,304 
*, 975 
"3,529 


"166 
166 
(*) 


*U8 
118 
(") 


"75 
(^ 


=578 
578 
(NA) 


=820 
820 
(NA) 


=28 

28 

(NA) 


=69 

69 

(NA) 


=682 
682 
(NA) 


=41 

41 

(NA) 


=74 

74 

(NA) 


1492 


3,848 
'»,558 
2,360 
8,862 
1,19} 
2,386 
18,172 


1,709 

1,598 

907 

4,157 
801 
974 

5,950 


298 

867 
196 

1,165 
206 
308 

2,660 


/5\ 


995 
1,538 

760 
=2,428 

515 

762 
=6,264 


556 
79 

270 
291 
181 
174 
1,259 


206 

270 
68 

547 
22 
5"* 

915 


504 
406 
159 
276 
70 
154 
1,144 


577 
517 
267 
509 
88 
446 
2,869 


1,171 
725 
580 
898 
l49 
8U 

4,188 


315 
175 
54 
128 
1 
137 
198 


218 

19 

212 
169 
42 
111 
982 


434 
510 
205 
482 

, 106 
455 

2,729 


204 
19 
109 
119 

io8 
279 


115 
50 

111 

153 
73 
79 

716 


14» 
1494 
1495 
1496 
1497 
1498 
1499 



Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 
Excludes data for mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 
^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsxnn mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of pxirchased fuels, purchased electricity, and con- 
tract work is included with the cost of supplies and pvtrchases for resale. 

^he cost of minerals received for preparation is included with the cost of supplies and purchases for resale. 
Data for preparation plant and other construction are included with those for used plant and equipment. 



24 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 



Table 3— Selected Statistics for Mineral 

(For explanation of column 



Establishments, number 



Division and State 



Total 



With 20 
or more 

em- 
ployees 



Includ- 
ing 
mining 
opera- 
tions 



Includ- 
ing 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 



Value of 
shipments 

and 
receipts""" 



($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Number of employees 



Total 



Produc- 
tion and 
develop- 
ment 

workers 



Other 
em- 
ployees^ 



Man-hours 

worked by 

production 

and 

development 

workers 

(1,000) 



United States, total. 



Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures . 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



New England. 



Maine 

New Hampshire. 

Vermont 

Massachusetts . 
Rhode Island . . 
Connecticut. . . 



Middle Atlantic. 



New York 

New Jersey. . . 
Pennsylvania . 



East North Central. 



Ohio 

Indiana. . . 
Illinois . . 
Michigan.. 
Wisconsin. 



West North Central. 



Minnesota. . . . 

Iowa 

Missouri 

North Dakota. 
South Dakota. 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



South Atlantic. 



Delaware and Maryland. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central. 



Kentucky . . . . 
Tennessee. . . 

Alabama 

Mississippi. 



West South Central. 



Arkansas. . 
Louisiana. 
Oklahoma . . 
Texas 



Mountain . 



Montana . . . . 

Idaho 

Wyoming . . . . 
Colorado . . . 
New Mexico. 
Arizona . . . . 

Utah 

Nevada 



Pacific. 



Washington . 

Oregon 

California . 



36,218 
1,566 



31A 

55 
38 
1+1 
111 
18 
81 

1^,500 

5^3 

135 

3,822 

'^,313 

1,436 
720 

1,323 
539 
295 

3,221 

289 
2» 
435 
167 
133 
305 
1,599 

4,701 

176 
1,033 
2,817 

231 
65 

173 

206 

3,215 

2,111 
S3 
316 
255 

10,062 

443 

1,121 
2,643 
5,855 

3,803 

440 
170 
492 
967 
761 
320 
450 
203 

2,059 

200 

201 

1,658 



6,279 

6,029 

250 



39 

2 
3 
7 

12 
5 

12 

636 
69 

42 

525 
659 
187 

95 

255 

87 

37 

452 



40 
69 
25 
13 
27 
189 



30 
196 
472 
53 
21 
58 
69 

575 

334 
94 
83 
64 

1,896 

61 

344 

342 

1,149 

566 

39 
22 
87 
129 
l42 
40 
79 
28 

307 

28 

15 

266 



31,130 

29,564 
1,566 



339 

54 
37 
40 
110 
18 
80 

4,030 

502 

133 

3,395 

3,792 

1,287 
648 

1,096 
473 
288 

2,679 

280 
290 

4l2 
136 
130 
264 

1,167 

4,351 



995 

2,546 

221 

63 

169 



2,817 

1,829 
508 
295 
185 

6,744 

352 

673 

1,916 

3,803 

3,106 

373 
165 
345 
815 
523 
507 
388 
190 

1,706 

192 

196 

1,318 



8,619 

8,397 
222 



217 

27 
25 
25 

66 
15 
61 

1,165 

217 
103 
845 

1,634 

523 
230 

406 
234 
241 

1,032 

198 
212 
248 
42 
51 
124 

157 
1,232 

77 
219 
536 

105 
46 
95 

154 

762 

381 
201 
139 

41 
832 



124 

166 

456 

781 



79 
70 
193 
112 
93 
94 
72 

742 

107 
131 

504 



18,450,826 

18,089,834 
360,992 



44,034 

2,826 

2,866 
9,575 

14,151 
1,630 

12,986 

1,160,015 

147,603 

48,651 

963,761 

1,324,808 

286,321 
136,511 
638,774 
218,308 
44,894 

1.267,166 

420,698 
45,066 
87,073 
65,573 
34,898 
81,168 

552,690 

1,411,426 

35,451 

199,246 

890,770 

39,328 

18,687 

74,746 

155,198 

983,325 

492,520 
106,763 
196,029 
188,013 

7,917,123 

136,475 
1,902,976 

860,630 
5,017,044 

2,447,655 

180,292 
52,084 
406,917 
362,473 
704,630 
249,442 
428,030 
63,789 

1,534,282 

34,136 

19,911 

1,480,255 



13,680,973 

13,381,494 
299,479 



32,301 

2,104 
1,977 
6,825 
10,624 
1,377 
9,396 

733,341 

115,960 
37,638 
579,743 

936,363 

191,336 
102,989 
452,357 
158,001 
31,680 

918,673 

311,745 
32,720 
66,386 
40,287 
25,145 
64,037 

378,353 

939,989 

22,604 

135,472 
606,633 
27,516 
13,090 
52,022 
82,652 

651,249 

320,296 

68,559 

127,055 

135,339 

6,158,639 

110,550 
1,527,697 

673,995 
3,846,417 

1,745,655 

115,932 
36,815 
343,940 
249,446 
551,972 
189,015 
246,198 
32,337 

1,265,284 

23,917 

15,879 

1,225,488 



753,537 

732,632 
20,905 



3,616 

301 

234 
790 
1,285 
l47 
859 

87,398 

9,657 

3,748 

75,993 

74,732 

20,790 

8,768 

27,112 

14,326 

3,736 

50,928 

17,178 
2,914 
8,454 
1,955 
2,569 
2,082 

15,776 

106,066 

2,340 
18, 014 
68,605 
3,701 
1,515 
5,201 

6,694 

62,083 

36,098 
8,744 

11,939 
5,302 

225,804 

5,302 

46,136 

38,237 

136,329 

84,958 

8,448 

3,932 

8,612 

14,109 

17,483 

15,283 

l4,0l4 

3,077 

37,047 

2,035 

1,220 

33,792 



584,012 

564,281 
19,731 



2,745 

266 
200 
674 
824 

117 
664 

72,795 

6,405 

2,812 

63,578 

60,937 

15,907 

7,076 

22,848 

U,865 

3,24l 

38,591 

11,726 
2,457 
6,319 
1,552 
2,215 
1,719 

12,603 

92,417 

1,996 
15,672 

60,160 
3,334 
1,272 
4,500 
5,483 

54,294 

32,099 
7,514 

10,555 
4,126 

151,708 

4,074 
33,268 
24,659 
89,707 

64,732 

5,824 

5,505 

6,004 

9,854 

13,541 

12,136 

11,598 

2,470 

26,062 

1,597 
991 

23,474 



169,525 

168,351 
1,174 



871 

55 

34 

116 

461 

30 

195 

14,603 

3,252 

936 

10,415 

15,795 

4,883 
1,692 
4,264 
2,461 
495 

12,337 

5,452 
457 

2,135 
403 
554 
363 

3,173 

13,649 

344 

2,542 

8,443 

367 

24l 

701 

1,211 

7,789 

3,999 
1,230 
1,384 
1,176 

74,096 

1,228 
12,868 
13,578 
46,422 

20,226 

2,624 
627 
2,608 
4,255 
3,942 
3,l47 
2,4l6 
607 

10,985 

438 

229 

10,318 



1,116,774 

1,077,864 
38,910 



5,744 

547 
413 

1,350 

1,750 

218 

1,466 

124,574 

13,626 

5,593 

105,155 

114,557 

29,764 
13,069 
43,151 
22,065 
6,308 

76,427 

22,295 
5,431 

12,122 
3,456 
4,615 
3,435 

25,073 

161,799 

3,800 

26,377 

100,839 

6,812 

2,613 

9,669 

11,689 

93,251 

53,115 

13,845 

17,501 

8,790 

320,248 

7,924 

75,422 

47,635 

189,257 

128,802 

10,994 
6,344 
11,994 
19,015 
28,068 
24,540 
22,851 
4,996 

52,871 

2,792 

1,982 

48,097 



See footnotes at end of "table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



25 



Operations, by Divisions and States: 1958 

captions see Introduotion) 







Principa] 


. expenses designated below 
($1,000) 






Pui'chased 
machinery 
installed^ 

($1,000) 


Capital expenditures^ 
($1,000) 


Energy used 
(kwh equivalent) 




Total 


Wages and 


salaries 


Minerals 


Supplies 

and 
purchases 

for 
resale^ 


Pur- 
chased 
fuels° 


Pur- 
chased 
elec- 
tricity^ 


Contract 
work'^ 


Total 


Develop- 
ment and 
explora- 
tion of 
mineral 
property 


Plant and 
other con- 
struction, 
machinery, 

and 
equipment 


Total 
(million) 


Per 
produc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 




Produc- 
tion and 
develop- 
ment 

workers 


Other 

em- 
ployees^ 


received 

for 
prepara- 
tion 




10,579,288 


2,695,588 


1,151,104 


1,758,380 


2,460,250 


275,732 


202,604 


1,855,650 


1,017,571 


2,800,514 


l,l4o,198 


1,660,116 


405, 4l4 


694 


1 


10,251,181 
148,107 


2,616,273 
79,515 


1,124,015 
7,089 


1,756,454 
1,926 


2,405,671 
56,579 


274,91*5 
789 


201,055 
1,51*9 


1,854,770 
860 


1,015,257 
2,511* 


2,797,810 
2,504 


1,140,198 
(MA) 


1,657,612 
2,504 


404,955 
479 


718 


2 
5 


30,487 


11,760 


5,717 


122 


7,792 


2,220 


1,484 


1,592 


2,695 


5,970 


151 


3,859 


711 


259 


4 


1,907 
1,890 
6,270 
10,869 
897 
8,654 


885 

708 

2,528 

3,887 

452 

3,302 


122 
245 
677 

5,190 
151 

1,351* 


112 
'10 


525 

444 

1,988 

2,125 

98 

2,6l4 


225 
115 
441 
792 
111 
558 


72 

75 

400 

461 

49 

429 


82 
195 
256 
4l6 

56 
407 


252 
174 
581 
962 
161 
765 


452 
224 
694 

1,227 
222 

1,171 


79 
2 

59 
4 
3 
4 


553 
222 
655 

1,225 
219 

1,167 


74 

51* 

189 

225 

|5 
162 


278 
170 
280 
271 
248 
244 


5 
6 
7 
8 
9 
10 


872,933 


524,407 


9i*,35l 


164,191 


155,957 


22,096 


30,078 


81,855 


65,188 


92,689 


17,1*85 


75,206 


14,926 


205 


11 


95,520 

32,084 

7^*5,329 


34,002 

13,366 

277,059 


25,025 

6,119 

65,207 


1*,979 

80 

159,152 


20,871 

8,426 

126,660 


l*,55'* 

1,492 

16,050 


4,068 

1,771 

24,259 


4,021 

830 

77,002 


5,930 

2,311 

56,91*7 


12,780 

5,897 

76,012 


5,91*2 

1,012 

12,529 


8,858 

2,885 

65,1*85 


2,766 

655 

11,505 


452 
255 
181 


12 
13 

14 


826,874 


292,921 


92,477 


150,045 


187,077 


29,641 


28,667 


66,048 


75,860 


126,891 


25,786 


101,105 


18,184 


298 


15 


213,175 

79,922 

350,882 

150,060 

32,837 


73,356 
32,452 
U3,007 
59,292 
14,834 


51*, 951 
11,117 
29,644 
15,926 
2,859 


29,599 

2,572 

81,294 

15,785 

995 


1*8,531 
21,0^ 
76,016 
53,005 
8,427 


8,645 
5,251 
9,259 
6,295 
2,251 


5,247 
5,658 
15,611 
4,689 
1,482 


12,844 

6,054 

28,071 

17,070 

2,029 


19,213 

12,479 

51,155 

8,450 

2,565 


29,094 
15,550 
52,969 
24,985 
l*,515 


'*,6l5 

2,262 

15,117 

5,118 

674 


24,479 
15,068 
59,852 
19,867 
5,859 


2,907 
1,650 
8,647 
4,504 
696 


183 
250 
578 
563 
215 


16 
17 
18 
19 
20 


677, "^95 


174,856 


78,219 


95,109 


171,912 


5l*,757 


18,505 


106,159 


69,131 


145,078 


1*7,891 


97,187 


25,645 


613 


21 


213,750 
26,752 
63,211* 
52,326 
25,382 
35,275 

262,798 


59,51*5 
9,765 

26,181 
8,025 

10,667 
7,204 

55,1*55 


57,552 
2,757 

11,766 
2,681 
1,965 
1,91*7 

19,575 


29,71*5 
568 
826 
(=) 

(^) 

56,074 


55,284 
8,51*8 

14,887 
=18,516 

=8,591 
=12,540 

60,244 


13,585 
2,552 
5,060 
1,668 
795 
1,884 

11,1*15 


7,270 
651 

3,234 
227 
784 
577 

5,960 


10,993 
2,115 
5,260 

21,411 

782 
11,521 
56,079 


7,51*7 
4,467 
8,784 
9,579 
1,529 
5,322 
51,905 


15,269 
6,555 
13,364 
25,915 
2,528 
14,315 
67,536 


2,847 
11*5 

1 872 

9,o44 
520 

5,772 
27,893 


12,422 
6,210 

11,492 

16,871 
2,208 
8,541 

39,1*1*3 


7,824 
94l 

1,505 
805 
484 

1,1*57 
10,829 


667 
383 
207 
519 
219 
848 
859 


22 
25 
24 
25 
26 
27 
28 


997,91*1 


599,482 


78,814 


^194,560 


^227,547 


19,711 


54,600 


45,227 


95,657 


141,845 


15,642 


126,203 


14, 697 


159 


29 


23,074 

150,791 

643,012 

24,990 

11,230 

43,128 

101,716 


7,462 

57,270 

282,825 

10,292 

4,020 

15,591 

22,022 


2,252 
11,129 
51,204 
1,982 
l,2l+5 
5,984 
7,040 


2,504 

29,209 

122,885 

571 

(^) 

879 

38,712 


7,150 
54,550 
158,966 

8,742 
=4,705 
16,147 
17,529 


1,057 
2,778 
5,644 
1,645 
705 
5,301 
l*,58l 


756 

5,799 

18,542 

1,5^8 

599 
2,098 
7,678 


1,953 

12,076 

22,946 

610 

160 

1,128 

l*,35i* 


5,525 
17,771* 
51,1*93 
2,996 
1,480 
6,996 
9,575 


3,858 

36,592 

76,339 

5,900 

1,850 

7,825 

11,681 


110 

1,728 

12,025 

288 
167 
356 
968 


5,71*8 

54,664 

64,514 

5,612 

1,683 

7,469 

10,715 


346 
1,635 
6,922 
725 
282 
1,880 
2^909 


175 

104 

115 
217 
222 
4l8 
531 


50 
51 
52 
55 
51* 
55 
56 


640,046 


220,515 


45,406 


150,558 


150,155 


14,025 


16,915 


64,692 


55,1*21 


99,670 


27,901 


71,769 


12,104 


225 


57 


338,577 

73,522 

127,350 

100,547 


129,052 
26,771* 

1*5,551 
18,958 


20,455 
5,872 
9,508 
7,593 


75,908 

(=) 
15,406 


75,249 
=52,085 
=57,264 

26,781 


5,351 

3,1*21 
2,444 
2,809 


9,987 

2,139 

4,151 

658 


24,617 
5,251 
8,452 

28,592 


28,065 

5,868 

10,555 

11,155 


44,951 

8,540 

15,672 

52,507 


9,781 
1,095 
1,009 

16,016 


55,170 

7,1*1*5 
12,665 
16,491 


4,145 
1,959 
1,491 
l*,551 


129 

258 

l4l 

1,098 


58 
59 
40 

41 


4,060,176 


719,785 


511,397 


654,542 


996,197 


99,559 


31,842 


1,067,056 


464,945 


1,555,1*57 


737,804 


797,655 


257,107 


1,565 


42 


57,823 

1,065,448 

507,751 

2,429,654 


16,562 
174,570 
104,668 
424,185 


7,063 

90,359 

90,653 

525,522 


^3,1*56 

112,644 
■"50, »8 
1*65,790 


■^16,464 

307,959 

■^116,622 

557,266 


2,186 
27,581 
12,062 
57,530 


1,208 

5,151 

6,361 

21,122 


11,084 
549,184 
126,847 
579,91*1 


7,8l4 

144,851 

60,422 

251,858 


16,269 
570,091 
186,217 
762,880 


5,867 

290,513 

96,686 

51*1*, 758 


10,402 

279,578 
89,551 

4l8,l42 


5,750 
47,91*6 
51,655 
155,776 


920 
1,441 
1,283 
l,7l4 


45 
44 
45 
46 


1,503,358 


529,888 


155,590 


^288,677 


^74,780 


56,107 


25,295 


315,021 


142,625 


480,505 


181,986 


298,519 


46,449 


718 


47 


124,435 
37,871 
159,290 
216,995 
446,205 
164,208 
304,495 
49,869 


27,859 
16,566 
50,959 
1*7,495 
70,076 
61,656 
62,855 
12,644 


16,257 
4,520 
18,005 
28,745 
27,157 
18,216 
17,052 
5,660 


35,014 

2,11*7 

16,718 

57,038 

89,911 

7,975 

101,876 

( = ) 


24,724 

9,022 

36,717 

57,755 

106,812 
46,680 
66,076 

=26,996 


2,288 
1,256 
4,464 
5,628 
8,944 
5,482 
6,200 
1,845 


2,662 
1,114 
2,706 
4,000 

4,067 
5,789 
5,190 
1,767 


17,651 

3,1*1*6 

49,741 

36,558 

139,258 

18,412 

47,246 

2,949 


7,466 

1,195 

18,729 

51,571* 

47,857 

6,012 

22,568 

7,644 


25,425 

2,911 

66,098 

59,106 

224,171 

29,921 

65,124 
9,71*9 


9,105 
1,558 
32,748 
14,852 
86,049 
10,596 
26,828 
670 


l4,520 

1,555 

55,550 

44,274 

158,122 

19,525 

58,296 

9,079 


2,879 

580 

7,175 

6,250 

19,1*51 

i*,579 

4,722 

855 


494 
175 

1,195 
652 

1,435 
377 
407 
31*5 


48 
49 
50 
51 
52 
55 
51* 
55 


621,871 


142,881 


86,044 


^108,176 


^144,750 


17,027 


13,671 


109,522 


1*7,757 


171,705 


85,574 


86,151 


37,106 


1,424 


56 


22,345 

15,263 

584,263 


7,881 

4,962 

150,058 


5,010 

1,299 

81,755 


9500 

166 

107,510 


^7,459 

4,552 

132,739 


1,068 

1,046 
ll*,915 


1*55 

205 

13,015 


1,971* 

3,055 

104,315 


1,568 

1,652 

1*1*, 557 


2,805 

6,602 

162,500 


490 

910 

84,174 


2,515 

5,692 

78,126 


1*75 

545 

56,286 


297 

348 

1,51*6 


57 
58 
59 



26 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 



Table 3.-SeIected Statistics for Mineral Operations, 

(For explanation of column 



9 

10 
11 

12 

13 

Ik 

15 
16 
IT 

18 
19 

20 
21 
22 
23 
24 
25 

26 

27 
26 
29 
30 
31 
32 
33 

jl^ 

35 
36 

37 
38 

39 

ko 
41 

42 

^^3 

44 

45 
46 
47 
48 
49 
50 
51 
52 

55 

54 
55 
56 



Division and State 



INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 
New England 

Maine 

New Hampshire 

Vermont 

Massachusetts 

Rhode Island 

Connecticut 



Middle Atlantic. 

New York 

New Jersey ... . 
Pennsylvania . . 



East North Central. 

Ohio 

Indiana 

Illinois 

Michigan 

Wisconsin 



West North Central. 



Minnesota. . . . 

Iowa 

Missoxjri 

North Dakota. 
South Dakota. 

Nebraska 

Kansas 



South Atlantic. 



Delaware, Maryland, and Dist. of Col. 

Virginia 

West Virginia 

North Carolina 

South Carolina 

Georgia 

Florida 



East South Central. 

Kentucky 

Tennessee 

Alabama 

Mississippi 



West South Central. 

Arkansas 

Louisiana 

Oklahoma 

Texas 



Mountain . 



Montana . . . . 

Idaho 

Wyoming . — 
Colorado . . . 
New Mexico. 
Arizona . . . . 

Utah 

Nevada 



Pacific 

Washington. 

Oregon 

California. 



Establishments, number 



Total 



99 

13 
7 

26 

33 
4 

16 

250 

79 
15 

156 

349 

163 
61 
52 
35 
38 

163 

28 
42 
34 
5 
9 
12 
33 

174 

32 
33 
9 
36 
21 
29 
14 

96 
12 
29 
41 
14 

154 

20 
11 
25 



113 

15 
13 
12 
25 

9 
18 
18 

5 

168 

39 
29 

100 



With 20 
or more 

em- 
ployees 



12 



Includ- 
ing 
mining 
opera- 
tions 



99 

13 
7 

26 

33 
4 

16 

250 

79 

15 

156 

349 

163 
61 
52 
35 

38 

163 

28 
42 
54 
5 
9 
12 
33 

174 

32 

33 

9 

36 

21 
29 

l4 



12 
29 

4i 
14 

154 

20 
11 
25 



115 

13 
13 
12 
25 
9 
18 
18 



168 

39 
29 

100 



Includ- 
ing 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 



37 
4 
2 

21 
5 
2 

3 

48 

16 
1 

31 

35 

3 
12 

1 

1 

18 



10 



Value of 
shipments 

and 
receipts'"" 

($1,000) 



27,198 

2,877 

992 

11.597 

9,680 
752 

1,300 

53,956 

16,055 

3,310 

34,591 

69,654 

27,333 

17,607 

11,067 

8,978 

4,669 

48,052 

10,937 
9,567 

16,213 

159 

1,646 

2,085 

7,445 

36,020 

5,810 
8,162 
l,6l4 
5,229 
1,654 
7,799 
5,752 

24,619 

1,115 

8,991 

13,367 

1,146 

32,483 

4,611 

550 

3,476 

23,846 

27,989 
1,209 
1,758 
1,012 
7,047 
2,44i 
7,735 
4,258 
2,529 

4l,021 

5,084 

3,174 

32,763 



Value 

added In 

mining 



($1,000) 



21,657 
2,278 
774 
8,943 
8,032 
486 
1,144 

45,848 

13,631 

3,025 

29,192 

57,951 

22,311 

1^^,939 

9,873 

7,463 

3,365 

37,823 

7,932 
8,382 
11,906 
123 
1,111 
1,834 
6,535 

29,775 
4,906 
7,099 
1,310 

■4,24i 
1,409 
6,026 
4,784 

20,585 

1,052 

7,442 

11,199 



27,482 

3,929 

556 

2,929 

20,268 

24,544 

1,061 
1,612 
830 
6,450 
2,174 
6,518 
3,93't 
1,965 

33,8l4 

4,469 

2,754 

26,591 



Number of employees 



Total 



2,905 

279 

94 

1,781 

618 

65 



803 

111 

2,075 

4,235 

1,478 

1,650 

370 

346 

391 

2,672 

986 
232 
877 

12 
173 

99 
293 

2,750 

202 
586 
112 
564 
78 
981 
227 

1,672 

36 

948 

644 

44 

1,457 

333 

25 

221 



848 

42 
47 
32 

164 
69 

326 
86 



1,377 
201 
l47 

1,029 



Produc- 
tion and 
develop- 
ment 

workers 



2,485 

264 

82 

1,483 

533 
57 
66 

2,907 

772 

111 

2,024 

4,037 

1,452 

1,515 

370 

345 

355 

2,490 

874 
232 
826 

12 
163 

99 
284 

2,585 

199 
568 
112 

510 

78 
893 

225 

1,596 

36 

897 

619 

44 

1,421 

325 
25 

217 
854 

843 
42 
47 
32 

160 
68 

326 



1,367 

198 

147 

1,022 



Other 
em- 
ployees^ 



420 

15 
12 

298 
85 



31 

51 

198 

26 

135 

1 
36 

182 
112 

51 

10 

9 

165 

3 
18 

'54 

'88 

2 

76 

'51 
25 

36 



NA Not available. 
For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment in making manufactured products . 

^Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsym raining operations in manufacturing establishments. Also for "Capital 
expenditures for development and exnloration of mineral property," excludes data for dimension stone mining operat"'"ns In manufacturing establishments. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations In manufacturing establishments the cost of purchased fuels, purcliased 
electricity, and contract work is Included with the cost of supplies and purchases for resale. 

Not shown since separate figures for energy used in mining operations in manufacturing establishments were not reportedfbr the major portion of all such 
operations . 

^The cost of minerals received for preparation is included with the cost of supplies and purchases for resale. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



27 



by Divisions and States : 1 9 5S— Continued 

captions see Introduction) 







Principal expenses designated below 








Capital expenditures^ 


Energy 


used^ 










($1,000) 












($1,000) 


(kwh equivalent) 






Wages and 


salaries 


Minerals 


Supplies 
and 








Purchased 




Develop- 


Plant and 










Produc- 




received 


Pur- 


Pur- 




maolilnery 




ment and 


other con- 




Per 




Total 


tion and 
develop- 


Other 
em- 


for 
prepara- 


purchases 
for 


cliased 
fuels^ 


chased 

elec- 
tricity^ 


Contrad 
worls^ 


. installed^ 


Total 


explora- 
tion of 


struction, 
machinery, 


Total 


produc- 
tion 






ment 


ployees^ 


tion 


resale^ 










mineral 


and 




worker 






workers 














($1,000) 




property 


equipment 


(million) 


(1,000) 




17,752 


9,767 


2,426 


428 


4,308 


294 


318 


21 


L 681 


699 


(MA) 


699 


163 


(^) 


1 


''^t 


^^ 


74 
125 


(10) 


i°599 


1"! 


1"! 


(ID 
^10 


) 28 
) ^*144 


28 
^"91 


Si 


28 

1*91 


16 
143 


m 


2 
3 


9,558 


5,407 


1,407 


(^) 


^2,289 


(li) 


160 


9 


3 480 


550 


(NA) 


550 


102 


(*) 


4 


"^,855 


2,461 


743 




^°1,649 


(10) 


(ig 


) 26 


27 


(NA) 


27 


41 


h) 


5 


55^ 


252 


62 


(16) 


10240 


(10) 


(ID) 


(lO 


j <", 


(14) 


(NA) 


(14) 


R 


n 


6 


439 


268 


15 




^°156 


(10) 


(lO) 


^10 


3 


(NA) 


3 


n 


7 


20,850 


12,207 


461 


45 


^7,957 


1354 


^85 


132 


L ^^219 


^273 


(NA) 


132^ 


32 


(*) 


8 


5,955 


5,398 


108 




2.408 
^285 


12 


12 


r 


(■ 128 


153 


(NA) 


155 


6 


(*) 


9 


755 


470 







(13) 


(13) 


(13 


) (") 


(13) 


(NA) 


(13) 


(12) 


n 


10 


ll*,120 


8,~339 


355 


45 


5,264 


42 


73 


1 


t- 91 


120 


(NA) 


120 


26 


n 


11 


50,371 


17,415 


1,227 


26 


10,969 


202 


313 


21 


? "593 


"619 


(NA) 


^619 


133 


(^) 


12 


11,712 


6,568 


115 




^^5,029 


(") 


(") 




15 


22 


(NA) 


22 


20 


(") 


13 


9,717 


6,115 


915 




,2,116 


127 


(??5 


la 


D 443 


462 


(NA) 


462 


94 


(*) 


14 


2,902 


1,708 






"1,194 


(") 




, 




(NA) 




1 


(*) 


15 


5,009 


1,490 


4 





;i,5i5 


( !) 


(") 




(13) 


(ii) 


(NA) 


(iij 


(12) 


n 


16 


5,051 


1,534 


193 


26 


^^1,245 


(") 


(") 


3; 


5 135 


135 


(NA) 


155 


18 


r) 


17 


21,791 


10,116 


1,446 


(^) 


^9,444 


87 


412 


28( 


':> "195 


"195 


(NA) 


^195 


70 


(*) 


18 


7,^77 


3,'t96 


976 




2,640 


59 


306 


.. 


,56 


56 


(NA) 


36 


54 


(^) 


19 


2,285 


1,100 







, 1,185 








(13) 


(13) 


(NA) 


(13) 


(12) 


(*) 


20 


8,019 


5,572 


340 


(lO) 


^°4,307 


(i6j 


(lO) 


(10 


) 97 


97 


(NA) 


97 


7 


r 


21 


^ 69 


35 






,n56 












(NA) 






(*) 


22 


1,227 


591 


101 




"°555 


(10) 


(ii) 


(16 


) '54 


'^ 


(NA) 


■54 


5 


(*) 


23 


671 


420 






251 






, , 


(") 


(13) 


(NA) 


(13) 


(12) 


(*) 


24 


2,01+3 


1,104 


29 


... 


"908 


(") 


(") 




i 8 


8 


(NA) 


8 


4 


(*) 


25 


15,928 


8,827 


826 


282 


^5,673 


^85 


^211 


ISgl 


^ '^359 


^^389 


(NA) 


^389 


45 


(*) 


26 


1,81+2 


924 


14 


... 


/^904 


(") 


(^^) 




3 


3 


(NA) 


3 


1 


(*) 


27 


5 '2'^ 


1,884 


88 




"1,063 


(") 


(") 




5 


3 


(NA) 


3 


3 


(* 


28 


876 


572 






304 












(NA) 






(*) 


29 


2,647 


l,4l9 


236 


172 


733 


33 


53 




L 71 


75 


(NA) 


75 


'14 


(*) 


30 


528 


285 






245 












(NA) 






(*) 


31 


^^,961 


2,682 


480 


P 


^1,59^ 


35 


147 


21 


) 282 


308 


(NA) 


308 


25 


(*) 


32 


2,039 


1,063 


8 


(lO) 


^°968 


(lO) 


(lO) 


(10 


) (^) 


(NA) 


(13) 


(12) 


(*) 


33 


9,581 


5,085 


44i 


190 


5,678 


35 


l49 




143 


164 


(NA) 


164 


24 


(^) 


3^ 


184 


121 


. . . 




/, ^5 


, , 






... 




(NA) 






(*) 


35 


4,509 


2,637 


302 


(=) 


"1,567 


C^ 


(^^) 




117 


138 


(NA) 


138 


'16 


n 


36 


4,498 


2,191 


139 


(^) 


"2,168 


(") 


(") 




26 


26 


(NA) 


26 


8 


(*) 


37 


390 


136 


... 


... 


234 






•• 


... 




(NA) 




... 


(*) 


38 


10,361 


5,144 


182 


120 


4,807 


16 


56 


3i 


; i4 


48 


(NA) 


48 


8 


(*) 


39 


1,844 


l,l4l 


21 


(10) 


^°682 


(lO) 


(lO) 


(10 


2 


2 


(NA) 


2 


2 


(*) 


40 


292 


98 






194 












(NA) 






(^) 


41 


1,311 


735 


8 




"568 


(") 


(") 




• . . 


21 


(NA) 


21 


3 


(^) 


42 


6,9l4 


3,170 


155 


(16) 


"°3,591 


(lO) 


(lO) 


(10 


12 


25 


(NA) 


25 


3 


n 


1^3 


7,317 


3,851 


15 




"3,1^45 


(") 


(") 


i 


45 


51 


(NA) 


51 


2 


(^) 


44 


327 


179 


• . . 




148 




• . . 






... 


(NA) 


... 


... 


(^) 


45 


345 


199 






^°L46 


(£6) 


(10) 


(ii 






(NA) 


. . . 


. . . 


(*) 


46 


535 


153 






182 












(NA) 




. . . 


(*) 


47 


1,290 


673 


14 




^°603 


(lO) 


(10) 


(10 


'16 


22 


(NA) 


22 


2 


(*) 


48 


547 


279 


1 




267 






, , 




• . . 


(NA) 


■ . . 


> . . 


(*) 


49 


2,818 
707 


1,601 
383 






1,217 
324 


... 




•• 


29 


29 


(NA) 


29 


(1^) 


(*) 


50 
51 


948 


384 






564 


... 


... 


•• 


... 


... 


(NA) 


... 


... 


(*) 


52 


14,176 


6,903 


65 


(=) 


"7,1^ 


(") 


(") 


^ 


50 


51 


(NA) 


51 


7 


(*) 


55 


1,701 


1,063 


23 


... 


^°6l5 


(lO) 


(10) 




15 


15 


(NA) 


15 


6 


(^) 


54 


1,080 


660 






^°420 


(10) 


(lO) 


(lO 


... 




(NA) 






C) 


55 


11,595 


5,180 


"42 


(lO) 


'°6,173 


(lO) 


(lO) 


(10 


35 


'36 


(NA) 


'36 


1 


(*) 


56 



For South Carolina, the cost of minerals received for preparation is included wltli the cost of supplies and purchases for resale. 
^For the Metal Mining Industries, the cost of minerals received for preparation is Included wltli the cost of supplies and purchases for resale, 
^or Nevada, the cost of minerals received for preparation is included with the cost of supplies and purchases for resale. 

^or Washington, the cost of minerals received for preparation in tlie Metal Mining and Nonmetalllc Minerals Mining Industries is included with the cost 
of supplies and purchases for resale. 

ror dimension stone operations in manufacturing industries the cost of minerals received for preparation, purchased fuels, purchased electricity, and 
contract work is included with the cost of supplies and purchases for resale. 

For dimension stone operations in manufacturing industries, the cost of purchased fuels and purchased electricity is included with the cost of supplies 
and purchases for resale. For Tennessee, Alabama, and Pacific, see also footnote 5. 
^Less than one-half of the unit of measure specified. 
For dimension stone operations in New Jersey and Florida, the cost of purchased fuels, purchased electricity, and contract work are included with the 
cost of supplies and purchases for resale. For dimension stone operations in New Jersey, Michigan, Iowa, Nebraska, and Florida, the cost of purchased 
ma£hinery and capital expenditures are excluded from the State and division totals. 
T'igures for Rhode Island are included with those for New Hampshire. 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 



Table 4— Selected Statistics for Mineral Operations in the United States, 

(For explanation of column captions and for statement on the minimum size of establishments 



Major industry group, industry, 
and year 



Number 
of 
oper- 
ating 
com- 
panies 



Establishments, number 



Total 



Includ- 


Includ 


ing 


ing 


mining 


prepa- 


opera- 


ration 


tions'"" 


plants 



Value of 

net 
shipments 

and 
receipts^ 



($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Number of persons engaged 



Produc- 
tion and 
develop- 
ment 
workers 



Other 

em- 
ployees^ 



Proprietors and 
firm members* 



Total 



Per- 
forming 
manual 

labor 



All mineral operations: 
Including oil and gas 
extraction: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

Excluding oil and gas 
extraction: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

1929 

Metal mining: 

1958 

1951+ 

1939 

1929 

Iron ores: 

1958 

195^+ 

1939 

1929 

Copper ores: 

1958 

195^ 

1959 

1929 

Lead and zinc ores: 

1958 

195*+ 

1939 

1929 

Lode gold and Silver ores: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

1929 

Placer gold: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

1929 

Bauxite : 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

1929 

Manganese ores: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

1929 

Timgsten ores: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

1929 

Ferroalloy ores, nee: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

Metal mining services: 

1958 

195^ 

1959 

See footnotes at end of table. 



31,926 
32,932 
20,658 



16,611 

17,814.8 

11,310 

(NA) 



1,906 

2,961 

1,886 

(NA) 



127 

9^ 

116 

(NA) 



112 

179 

35 

(NA) 



226 
411 
208 
(NA) 



302 

581+ 

1,004 

(NA) 



73 
131 
307 
(NA) 



12 

12 

10 

(NA) 



182 

319 

26 

(NA) 



32 

500 

39 

(NA) 



75 

155 
17 



91 

111+ 
69 



37,784 

38,663 

(NA) 



19,283 

21,078 

(NA) 

10,996 



2,253 

3,1+96 

(NA) 

1,799 



2I+2 
225 
(NA) 
186 



II+8 
210 
(NA) 
143 



520 
(NA) 
305 



305 
399 
(NA) 
24l 



74 
136 

(NA) 
32 



29 

25 

(MA) 

9 



186 

367 

(NA) 
19 



32 
549 
(NA) 

12 



76 
170 
(NA) 



95 

U4 

69 



31,130 
32,244 
22,162 



I8,4l4 
20,736 
13,557 
12,506 



2,056 
3,356 
2,095 
2,007 



252 
298 
196 
124 



l4o 

201 

51 

180 



275 
491 
260 

375 



i,c 



303 
392 
,038 
258 



74 
136 
340 

37 



176 

360 

34 



28 

524 

55 

13 



73 

158 

16 



XXX 
XXX 
XXX 



8,619 

8,8l4 
5,450 



8,026 

8,232 

4,716 

(NA) 



602 
993 
693 
(NA) 



123 

123 

44 

(NA) 



69 
l4i 
124 
188 



58 
159 
365 

94 



74 
U6 
339 
(NA) 



9 

11 

(NA) 



68 

63 

l4 

(NA) 



18 

171 

32 

(NA) 



XXX 

XXX 
XXX 



16,715,395 

'14,450,664 
3,413,954 



6,059,363 

^5,220,719 

1,754,123 

2,392,831 



1,571,191 

^1,361,035 

517,377 

633,821 



635,388 
539,160 
150,871 
197,335 



374,428 
409,911 
141,634 
283,517 



105,843 
140,132 
62,651 
112,428 



40,655 

38,943 

105,780 

26,107 



6,326 

5,916 

28,027 

3,779 



17,374 

16,029 

2,527 

2,239 



34,350 

27,016 

945 

1,184 



■^14,430 

49,846 

5,354 

734 



57,675 
60,075 
15,458 



32,384 

38,539 

2,368 



13,680,973 

11,740,054 

2,765,396 



4,645,684 
4,066,360 
1,429,122 
1,955,804 



1,187,327 

^1,075,519 

416,956 

496,335 



500,232 
435,668 
133,390 
167,127 



266,485 
334,876 
108,494 
221,690 



73,679 

107,409 

47,310 

84,793 



33,023 
31,740 
82,863 
17,604 



4,873 

3,6i4 

21,935 

2,582 



15,430 

12,827 

1,965 

1,781 



20,0l4 

18,118 

707 

967 



8,164 

40,744 

2,427 

540 



46,077 
48,537 
13,271 



22,862 

26,703 

1,822 



584,012 
666,621 
774,130 



370,077 
431,138 
625,134 
812,220 



71,402 

81,896 

89,791 

115,775 



23,659 
28,216 
20,377 
28,623 



20,898 
21,544 
23,844 
44,502 



8,728 
13,592 
15,731 
25,907 



3,088 

3,699 

21,847 

7,946 



323 

501 

3,228 

578 



502 
661 
727 
602 



1,792 

2,266 

504 

354 



508 

2,635 

701 

186 



2,080 

1,937 

963 



1,973 

2,863 

637 



169,525 

139,347 

82,259 



70,660 
59,095 
45,105 
53,331 



21,099 

18,354 

10,344 

9,802 



7,917 
5,954 
2,274 
2,490 



6,744 
6,269 
2,908 
3,465 



2,499 
2,974 
1,994 
1,818 



487 

576 

2,034 

663 



4l 

55 

477 

90 



203 
191 
100 

87 



307 
338 

41 
35 



130 
352 
l43 

31 



621 
550 

l4l 



211 
196 



36,827 
40,176 
l6,o4o 



16,442 

20,552 

8,310 

4,897 



1,848 

3,525 

1,169 

513 



130 

73 

32 

9 



104 
184 



76 



212 

450 

89 

78 



251 
366 

631 
114 



77 
173 
260 

18 



209 

458 

12 

4 



19 

7l4 

31 

3 



110 

243 

9 



l6,042 

20,958 

7,068 



9,324 

13,959 

5,213 

(NA) 



1,190 

2,721 

824 

(NA) 



83 

46 

14 

(NA) 



i>9 
145 

(NA) 



l4l 

343 

48 

(NA) 



185 
289 
492 
(NA) 



56 
l45 
167 
(NA) 



(NA) 



128 
586 

4 
(NA) 



9 

654 

22 

(NA) 



69 

194 

5 



50 
55 
28 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



29 



by Major Industry Group and Industry: 195S, 1954, 1939, and 1929 

Included for each year, see Introduction. For 1929, excludes data for service Industries) 





Principal expenses designated 
($1,000) 


below 




Purchased 
machinery 
installed'^ 


Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 


Energy 
used* 

(million 
kwh 




Wages and 


salaries 


Supplies 

and 
purchases 

for 
resale^ 


Purchased 
fuels ^ 


Purchased 
elec- 
tricity^ 


Contract 
work^ 


Develop- 
ment and 
explora- 
tion of 
mineral 
property 


Prepara- 
tion 
plant and 
other con- 
struction^ 


New 

machinery 

and 
equipment^ 


Used plant 

and 
equipment^ 




Production 

and 

development 

workers 


Other g 
employees 
















($1,000) 










equivalent) 




2,695,588 

2,639,378 

970,5^6 


1,131,101* 
817,601 
20l*,225 


2,1*60,250 

2,025,577 

507,980 


275,732 

206,1*91 

60,965 


202,601* 

161,083 

69,21*5 


1,855,630 

1,827,372 

210,368 


1,017,571 

1,214,881 

(NA) 


1,140,198 

1,309,076 

(NA) 


466,585 

313,905 

27,1*35 


1,095,225 
992,399 
241,155 


98,506 

110,285 

21,962 


405, 4l4 
373,126 
224,898 


1 
2 

3 


1,681*, 909 

1,662,785 

750,111 

1,099,895 


1*1*2,363 
331,753 
106,278 
159,023 


1,058,850 
855,028 
220,789 
298,198 


11*5,080 

109,681 

3l*,7l8 

1*9,11*6 


11*9,271 

126,066 

62,11*4 

71,769 


296,300 

269,513 

7,350 

17,911* 


363,359 

351,676 

(NA) 

86,735 


64,885 

79,118 

(NA) 

89,646 


206,846 

155,085 

16,217 

(NA) 


299,224 

224,649 

52,666 

(NA) 


39,624 

40,499 

9,1*51 

(NA) 


95, 101 

88,050 

77,131 

133,790 


4 
5 
6 
7 


356,209 
555,505 
127,111 
178,319 


131,577 

109,722 

26,806 

27,1*81* 


282,1*06 

^229,913 

68,719 

93,951 


37,986 
26,936 
10,1*00 
17,098 


37,250 
52,662 
18,686 
18,975 


152,1*05 

117,079 

2,616 

7,1*62 


69,531 

86,891 

(NA) 

25,391 


44,228 

64,569 

(NA) 

59,682 


97,647 

84,515 

5,409 

(NA) 


65,298 

65,655 

l'*,775 

(NA) 


7,118 

6,550 

5,51*2 

(NA) 


27,383 
21,087 
14,628 
24,727 


8 
9 

10 
11 


120,618 

119,688 

27,1*31 

1*1,01*9 


53,769 

37,221 

5,895 

6,385 


80,320 
75,866 
10,791 
18,717 


17,1*1*7 
9,51*9 
2,280 
5,552 


ll*,000 

13,767 

l*,17i* 
1*,607 


29,510 

1*7,515 

236 

1,552 


18,516 

36,991* 

(HA) 

4,016 


10,915 

23,515 

(NA) 

10,223 


11,944 

52,790 

784 

(NA) 


18,675 

27,955 

3,550 

(NA) 


1,217 
718 
210 
(NA) 


11,106 
5,928 
5,21*6 
7,763 


12 
15 
14 
15 


106,357 
98,1*91 
3l*,l*86 
75,200 


37,lW* 

37,57'* 

8,078 

10,156 


86,587 
72,822 
23,562 
1*3,995 


9,7i*J* 
8,576 
1*,168 
9,210 


9,1*76 
6,278 
1*,899 
6,027 


22,021* 

1*3,873 

511 

2,595 


19,191 

23,821 

(NA) 

13,084 


9,720 

23,750 

(NA) 

22,151 


ll*,855 

35,265 

1,822 

(NA) 


16,531* 

21,955 

2,577 

(NA) 


3,785 

1,240 

1,507 

(NA) 


10,239 
9,255 
6,693 

12,200 


16 
17 
18 
19 


39,001 
53,676 
20,255 
59,191 


15,396 

17,687 

5,081* 

5,055 


21,185 
21*, 675 
10,580 
18,51*1* 


1,058 
1,1*09 

81*8 
1,536 


5,869 
6,838 
3,550 
6,102 


2,952 

6,080 

363 

1,653 


2,920 

5,91*2 

(NA) 

5,752 


4,160 

6,509 

(NA) 

8,172 


1,S*5 

2,054 

390 

(NA) 


2,502 

2,509 

778 

(NA) 


112 
448 
339 

(NA) 


1,153 
1,641 
1,556 
2,964 


20 
21 
22 
25 


15,5^9 
15,1*09 
33,321 
12,9^ 


2,655 
2,898 
'*,973 
1,738 


7,188 

7,181* 

16,261 

5,931* 


771* 

671* 

1,595 

558 


1,227 

991 

3,921 

1,317 


580 

681* 

l,li*0 

69I* 


1,065 

1,356 

(NA) 

1,509 


1,116 

1,624 

(NA) 

5,641 


871 

728 

1,890 

(NA) 


651 

590 

3,588 

(NA) 


246 

301 
615 

(NA) 


1*57 

720 

1,830 

1,130 


24 
25 
26 
27 


1,515 

1,997 

5,632 

970 


275 

31^^ 

1,162 

260 


1,070 

1,551* 

3,780 

590 


9^ 
2l*8 
700 

1 


^31 
661 

1,1*71 
601* 


85 

1*1 

11*1 

2 


115 
302 
(NA) 
359 


65 

180 

(NA) 

76 


91 

52 

135 

(NA) 


U5 

121 

3,31*8 

(NA) 


69 
151 
442 
(NA) 


71 
170 
510 

69 


28 
29 
30 
31 


2,290 

2,529 

578 

513 


1,316 

1,052 

2l*l 

277 


728 
789 
269 
216 


258 
239 
187 
122 


172 

15I* 

60 

38 


1*45 

1,605 

46 

82 


1,1*85 
556 

(NA) 
96 


24 

24 

(NA) 

15 


107 

11 

20 

(NA) 


1,247 
271 
173 
(NA) 


50 
4 

(NA) 


151 
170 
270 
(NA) 


32 
33 
31* 
35 


7,21*1* 

7,61*3 

1*83 

392 


1,792 

1,61*9 

83 

88 


5,216 

5,087 

161 

ll*0 


1,101 
721 

37 
32 


677 

1*77 

1*0 

39 


2,807 
5,573 

"6 


1,085 

2,304 

(NA) 

12 


469 

607 

(NA) 

40 


2» 
708 

(NA) 


1,115 

1,366 

29 

(NA) 


355 

585 

6 

(NA) 


582 

477 

37 

73 


36 
37 
38 
39 


1,993 

15,11*8 

l,Ult 

297 


91I* 

1,610 

251* 

61 


1,385 

8,295 

659 

127 


17 

933 

99 

10 


217 

753 

111* 

53 


1,885 
55 

4 


98 

3,562 

(NA) 

14 


17 
2,168 

(NA) 
92 


52 

1,267 

163 

(NA) 


56 

2,224 

205 

(NA) 


17 
667 

104 
(NA) 


25 
371 

41 
(NA) 


40 
41 
42 
45 


10,218 

10,539 

1,1*99 


'*,550 

3,9^6 

561 


9,216 
9,855 
1,736 


553 

357 

1*1* 


1,369 

1,289 

364 


3,718 

3,559 

1*3 


975 
2,609 

(NA) 


817 
4X0 
(NA) 


2,370 

3,331* 

42 


925 

1,987 
102 


121 

198 
40 


315 

280 

44 


44 
1*5 
46 


10,621* 

13,933 

853 


1,1*73 

1,355 

152 


7,657 

10,1*12 
582 


1,271 

1,275 

ll*l* 


60 

133 

20 


452 
509 
(NA) 


1,365 

2,049 

(NA) 


XXX 

xxx 

XXX 


31* 
523 
(NA) 


1,155 

1,522 

(NA) 


71* 
355 
(NA) 


340 
358 
(NA) 


1*7 
48 
49 



30 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 



Table 4— Selected Statistics for Mineral Operations in the United States, by 

(For explanation of column captions and for statement on the minimum size of establishments 



Major industry group, industry, 
and year 



Number 

of 
oper- 
ating 
com- 
panies 



Establishments, number 



Total 



Includ- 


Includ 


ing 


ing 


mining 


prepa- 


opera- 


ration 


tions ■"■ 


plants 



Value of 

net 
shipments 

and 
receipts^ 



($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Number of persons engaged 



Produc- 
tion and 
develop- 
ment 
workers 



Other 

em- 

ployees^ 



Proprietors and 
firm members* 



Total 



Per- 
forming 

manual 
labor 



Man-hours 
worked by 
production 

and 
development 
workers 



(1,000) 



17 
18 
19 
20 



21 
22 
.25 



2k 
25 
26 



27 
28 
29 
50 



51 
32 
35 



57 
58 
59 



Metal mining — Continued 

Mercury ores: 

1958 

195^ 

1959 

1929 



Titanium ores: 

1958 

195^ 

1959 



Uranium-radium-vanadium ores : 

1958 

19^ 

1939 



Metallic ores, neo: 

1958 

195^ 



Anthracite mining: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

1929 



Anthracite: 

1958 

195!^ 

1959 

1929 



Anthracite stripping services: 

1958 

195^ 

1959 



Anthracite mining services, nee: 

1958 

195^ 

1959 



Bituminous coal and lignite 
mining: 

1958 , 

195^ 

1959 

1929 



BituminoioB coal: 

1958 

195^ 

1959 



Lignite : 
1958.. 
195^.. 
1959- • 



Coal stripping services, nee and 
Coal mining services, nee: 

1958 

195^ 

1959 



Oil and gas extraction: 

1958 

195^ 

1959 



Crude petroleum and natural gas: 

1958.... 

195^ 

1959 



77 

81 

72 

(NA) 



565 

57£ 



1,157 

1,296 

359 

(NA) 



1,075 

1,160 

289 

(NA) 



78 

131 

58 



6,300 

6,104 

5,182 

(NA) 



6,102 
5,913 
5,021 



55 

56 

150 



157 

152 

52 



15,363 

15,099 

9,5*^8 

9,^5 
9,720 
8,061 



79 

87 

(NA) 

40 



11 

10 

(NA) 



602 
657 
(NA) 



1,248 

1,^+56 

(NA) 



1,165 

1,291 
(NA) 
198 



79 
152 



6,950 

6,855 

(NA) 

"+,995 



6,715 

6,645 

(HA) 



58 

60 

(NA) 



157 

152 

52 



18,501 
17,585 
10,909 

11,993 

11,508 

8,605 



582 
636 



1,065 

1,265 

518 

505 



1,065 

1,265 

518 

303 



XXX 
XXX 
XXX 



XXX 
XXX 
XXX 



6,561 

6,844 
5,847 
5,659 



6,503 
6,784 
5,716 



60 
151 



XXX 
XXX 
XXX 



12,716 

11,508 

8,605 



11,995 

11,508 

8,605 



72 

75 

60 

(NA) 



196 
165 
(NA) 



196 
165 
(NA) 



XXX 
XXX 
XXX 



XXX 

XXX 

XXX 



1,851 
628 
365 

(NA) 



1,807 
628 
565 



24 



XXX 
XXX 
XXX 



595 
582 
756 



XXX 
XXX 
XXX 



■^8,607 

■^'+,519 
1,850 
2,820 



16,531 

■^12,750 

458 



226,999 

(NA) 

1,472 



^5,018 
■^1,525 



254,000 
291,408 
201,126 
584,854 



199,214 
248,513 
189,648 
384,854 



54,465 
42,048 
10,956 



523 
847 
542 



2,091,428 

1,806,319 

731,427 

966,694 



2,058,79^ 

1,778,336 

727,558 



11,035 
10,587 
3,'t57 



21,599 

^17,596 

612 



10,656,052 
9,229,945 
1,659,^1 

8,584,586 
7,070,062 
1,575,954 



7,095 
5,555 
1,425 
2,042 



12,746 

ll,15'^ 

570 



174,802 

(NA) 

1,045 



1,847 
794 



164,489 
196,855 
15^,023 
320,756 



142,198 
167,090 
l46,4l8 
520,756 



22,027 

29,079 

7,126 



264 
666 

479 



1,609,964 

l,4l8,584 

610,674 

819,976 



1,585,5^1 

1,596, 77*+ 

607,518 



9,309 
9,095 
2,879 



15, n't 

12,517 
477 



9,055,289 
7,675,694 
1,242,475 

7,539,922 
6,129,213 
1,071,989 



569 

572 

621 

1,029 



706 
568 
183 



6,589 

2,944 
578 



187 



20,047 

55,026 

83,112 

142, 801 



17,266 

28,823 

80,429 

l42,801 



2,757 
4,074 
2,461 



44 
129 
222 



165,555 
199,655 
370,944 
458,855 



161,711 
197,819 
369,265 



457 

505 

1,480 



1,585 
1,551 

199 



213,955 

255,1+83 
148,996 

102,445 
109,792 
105,505 



256 

275 

15 



1,550 

525 

65 



2,766 
4,436 
5,480 
8,570 



2,446 
3,9^6 
5,284 
8,370 



317 
482 
185 



24,175 
19,178 
19,854 
23,686 



23,965 
18, 99'+ 
19,690 



73 

69 

115 



135 

115 

29 



98,865 
80,252 
57, 15^+ 

77,595 
62,714 
50,546 



78 

125 

51 

10 



507 

6l4 

5 



1,865 

2,358 

501 

38 



1,795 

2,201 

252 

38 



60 

126 

56 



7,511 
7,760 
4,676 
2,983 



7,071 
7,539 
4,497 



. 57 

57 

144 



185 

164 

35 



20,585 

19,824 

7,750 

l4,28l 

13,516 

6,294 



62 

110 

41 

(NA) 



291 

559 

5 



1,298 

2,065 

161 

(NA) 



1,255 

1,985 

159 

(NA) 



5,785 

5,485 

5,409 

(NA) 



3,629 

5,524 
5,271 



43 
118 



118 

118 

20 



6,918 
6,999 
1,855 

3,984 
3,886 
1,51+6 



1,223 

841 

1,421 

(NA) 



1,254 

1,261 

522 



13,873 

6,227 

879 



345 
207 



50,867 

48,266 

124,462 

(NA) 



26,409 

42,061 

120,085 

(NA) 



4,595 
6,058 
4,058 



65 
167 
339 



267,699 

525,769 

545,702 

(NA) 



264,508 
522,410 
542,310 

844 

901 

5,027 



2,547 

2,458 

565 



440,102 

491,718 
265,028 

200,930 
216,581 
190,674 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



31 



Major Industry Group and Industry; 1958, 1954, 1939, and 1929— Continued 

included for eacli year, see Introduction. For I929, excludes data for service industries) 





Principal expenses designated 

($1,000) 


below 




Purchased 
machinery 
installed^ 




Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 




Energy 
used® 

(million 

kwh 




Wages and salaries 


Supplies 

and 
purchases 

for 
resale^ 


Purcliased 
fuels^ 


Purchased 
elec- 
tricity^ 


Contract 
work^ 


Develop- 
ment and 
explora- 
tion of 
mineral 
property* 


Prepara- 
tion 
plant and 
otlier con- 
struction® 


New 
machinery 

and 
equipment® 


Used plant 

and 
equipment® 




Production 

and 

development 

workers 


other 
employees^ 
















($1,000) 










equivalent) 




2,627 

1,607 

752 

1,385 


1+85 
365 
161+ 
220 


^,462 

«1,160 

229 

464 


387 
204 
159 
250 


102 
61 
53 
69 


55 
28 

4 
15 


370 
226 
(NA) 
618 


290 
167 
(NA) 
460 


151 
176 

68 
(NA) 


552 
116 
139 
(NA) 


89 
56 

54 
(NA) 


129 
78 
92 

l4o 


1 
2 
5 
4 


2,882 
2,397 

ll+O 


l,6ii+ 
1,302 

1+2 


^,252 
^2,801 

38 


6l4 

449 

15 


1,077 

743 

35 


121 
535 


1,831 

1,286 

(NA) 


59 
(NA) 


529 

2,904 
15 


2,115 

1,092 

72 


2 


426 
361 

18 


5 
6 
7 


31+, 1+59 

11,908 

1+97 


9,983 

2,660 

112 


57,027 

9,844 
244 


4,525 

2,265 

140 


2,505 
505 
... 


69,613 

7,462 

1+5 


20,092 

5,556 

(NA) 


16,499 

5,494 

(NA) 


64,578 

4,289 

77 


19,660 

3,842 

169 


828 

1,168 

17 


2,344 

1,266 

224- 


8 

9 
10 


852 
558 


211 
109 


^^1,196 

^655 


11+5 
4l 


48 
32 


56 

152 


427 

748 


99 
121 


227 
212 


198 
105 


175 
639 


1+5 
12 


11 
12 


79,1+25 
115,952 
107,798 
229,967 


15,971 
21,997 
12,252 
21,282 


29,950 
29,027 
25,489 
43,367 


4,062 
5,952 
3,920 
7,420 


7,325 
8,787 
6,524 
6,509 


40,505 

51,226 

11,170 

6,802 


10,035 
9,270 

(NA) 
5,580 


3,818 

1,438 

(NA) 

7,902 


1,879 

2,241 

1,771 

(NA) 


9,685 

4,767 

2,882 

(NA) 


1,211 
2,048 

322 

(NA) 


5,881 

7,198 

19,716 

42,694 


15 
14 
15 
16 


67,1+1+9 

98,678 

10l+,578 

229,967 


12,021+ 
19,592 
11,1+82 
21,282 


20,777 
20,224 
22,496 
'+3,567 


2,546 
2,058 
5,275 

7,420 


6,8l4 
8,597 
6,450 
6,509 


59,519 

50,156 

11,029 

6,802 


6,517 

5,667 

(NA) 

5,580 


5,818 

1,1+58 

(NA) 

7,902 


1,811 

2,148 

1,771 

(NA) 


6,333 
5,567 

1,97^+ 
(NA) 


842 
951 
221 
(NA) 


5,51+7 

6,589 

19,455 

42,694 


17 
18 
19 
20 


11,780 

lt+,809 

5,166 

196 
1+1+5 
251+ 


1,957 

2,571 

71+9 

10 
51+ 
21 


9,101 

8,651 
2,956 

52 
152 

57 


1,708 

1,868 

619 

8 
26 
26 


511 

390 

94 


1,186 

1,068 

l4l 

"2 
(NA) 


3,615 

5,529 

(NA) 

101 

74 

(NA) 


3fXX 
XXX 
XXX 

XXX 
XXX 
XXX 


68 
95 


5,51+9 
1,371, 


268 
1,073 

101 

101 
44. 


526 
602 
261 

8 
(NA) 


21 


S99 


23 


XXX 


1 
29 


24 
25 


9 


26 


760,361+ 
76i+,863 
1+32,188 
57i+,919 


152,1+20 

109,1+1+2 

l+i+,i+88 

58,61+7 


373,569 

322,916 

88,516 

106,560 


25,556 

17,111 

5,1+32 

7,529 


56,676 
47,802 
24,895 
30,739 


70,652 

55,188 

1,910 

1,890 


151,955 

121,640 

(NA) 

34,947 


9,058 

3,601 

(NA) 

16,928 


66,665 

54,168 
5,521 

(NA) 


101,219 

66,206 

22,471 

(NA) 


11,255 

14,856 

2,967 

(NA) 


14,903 

15,351 
22,587 
37,766 


27 
28 
29 
30 


751,581+ 
757,175 
1+30,561+ 


151,175 

108,1+7'+ 

1+4,183 


368,722 

319,298 

88,095 


21,628 

15,712 

5,299 


56,509 
47,512 
24,749 


69,727 

5'+,251 

1,899 


147,493 

118,481 

(NA) 


8,984 

3,586 

(NA) 


66,462 

55,948 

5,505 


97,7^ 
63,845 
22,357 


10,758 

14,382 

2,947 


14,303 
14,854 
22,339 


31 
52 
55 


2,261 
2,177 

1,381+ 


1+32 
1+11 
219 


1,155 
627 
542 


210 

239 

80 


260 
254 
145 


55 

206 
11 


1,522 
607 
(NA) 


7*+ 

15 

(NA) 


69 

134 
16 


1,236 

479 

75 


53 
11 

20 


111 
144 
248 


54 
35 
36 


6,519 

5,511 

2I+0 


813 

557 

86 


3,714 

2,991 

81 


1,698 

1,160 

53 


107 
36 

1 


872 
751 
(NA) 


2,940 

2,552 

(NA) 


XXX 

XXX 
XXX 


152 
86 


2,200 
1.882 


464 
443, 


489 
355 
(NA) 


37 
58 


4l 


59 


1,010,679 
976,595 
220,1+35 


688,71+1 

1+85,81+8 

97,91+7 


1,401,400 

1,168,549 

(MA.) 


130,652 

96,810 

(NA) 


55,335 

55,017 

(NA.) 


1,559,330 

1,557,859 

(NA) 


65i+,252 

865,205 

(NA) 


1,075,515 
1,229,958 

(NA) 


259,759 

158,822 

(NA) 


796,001 

767,750 

(NA) 


N 

58,682 
69,786 

(NA) 


510,313 

285,096 

(NA) 


40 
41 
42 


1+97,571 
1+59,955 
155,700 


51+4,615 

375,785 

79,199 


951,911 

692,682 

78,558 


56,204 
56,177 
19,647 


45,770 

50,624 

6,7^^6 


1,449,571 

1,458,807 

199,054 


486,021 

621,048 

(NA) 


1,062,206 

1,206,214 

(NA) 


197,671+ 
98,229 

9,757 


646,589 
558,950 
177,849 


37,224 

55,061 
11,561 


137,440 

l4l,655 

92,788 


1+5 
44 
45 



32 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 



Table 4— Selected Statistics for Mineral Operations in the United States, by 

(For explanation of column captions and for statement on the minimum size of establishments 



Major industry group, 
and year 



industry. 



Number 

of 
oper- 
ating 
com- 
panies 



Establishments, number 



Includ- 
ing 
mining 
opera- 
tions'"" 



Includ- 
ing 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 



Value of 

net 
shipments 

and 
receipts^ 



($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

raining 



($1,000) 



Number of persons engaged 



Produc- 
tion and 
develop- 
ment 
workers 



Other 

em- 

ployees~ 



Proprietors and 
firm members* 



Total 



Per- 
forming 
manual 

labor 



Man-hours 
vforked by 
production 

and 
development 
workers 



(1,000) 



5^^ 
55 
36 

37 



Oil and gas extraction — 
Continued 

Natural gas liquids: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

Drilling oil and gas wells 
services: 

1958 

195't 

1959 

Oil and gas exploration services 

1958 

195^ 

Oil and gas field services, nee: 

1958 

195^ 



Nonmetallic minerals mining: 
1958: 

Including operations in 

manufactures 

Mineral industries only. 
195^: 

Including operations in 

manufactures 

Mineral industries only. 

1939 

1929^ 



Dimension stone: 
1958: 

Including operations in 

manufactures 

Mineral industry only.. . 
195^: 

Including operations in 

manufactures 

Mineral industry only . . . 



Mineral Industiry only: 
Dimension limestone: 

1958 

195^ 

1959 



Dimension granite: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 



Dimension stone, nee: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 



Crushed and broken stone: 
1958: 

Including operations in 

manufactures 

Mineral industry only 

195^: 

Including operations in 

manufactures 

Mineral industry only ........ 

Mineral industry only: 

Crushed and broken limestone: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

1929 



176 
181 
295 



2,911 

2,Sh6 

985 



529 
309 



2,1*56 
2,313 



7,236 
6,137 



7,571 
6,623 
1^,127 

(NA) 



504 
306 



523 
322 



178 
180 



1,680 
1,597 

1,632 

1,522 



1,176 

1,171* 

716 

(NA.) 



593 
562 
685 



3,064 

2,869 

985 

330 



2,504 
2,316 



8,872 
7,306 



9,291 

8,074 

(NA) 

4,004 



557 
335 



555 
351 



65 
(NA.) 



76 

86 

(NA) 



191 
200 
(NA) 



2,176 
1,957 



2,166 
1,911 



1,458 

1,447 

(NA) 

742 



xxx 

XXX 

xxx 



592 

(NA) 
(NA) 



3 
(NA) 



128 
(NA) 



8,732 
7,166 



9,273 
8,054 
5,097 
4,557 



557 
335 



558 
352 



191 

200 

51 



2,152 
1,933 

2,166 
1,911 



1,441 

1,443 

918 

785 



593 
582 

736 



XXX 

xxx 

XXX 



xxx 

xxx 



xxx 
xxx 



5,405 
5,183 



6,415 
6,211 

3,459 

(NA) 



231 
9 

204 



1,813 
1,813 



1,790 
1,790 



1,387 

1,362 

(NA) 

(NA) 



706,915 

582,866 

96,338 



902,721 
968,129 
128,107 



86,108 
■^114,815 



575,702 
■^543,460 



2,162,744 
1,807,622 



1,761,957 

1,522,755 

323,043 

407, 461 



85,446 
15,719 



76,282 
I8,4l8 



4,174 
3,598 
l,54l 



5,517 
5,738 
3,268 



6,028 
9,282 
1,547 



741,038 
602,305 



577,793 
458,846 



446,860 

323,703 

55,172 

66,908 



587,580 

425,937 

(NA) 



587,440 

625,967 

(NA) 



64,355 
81,501 



455,994 
413,276 



1,683,904 
1,384,425 



1,375,622 

1,181,986 

255,702 

518,757 



67,131 
13,076 



61,774 
15,155 



3,741 
2,942 
1,368 



4,085 
4,590 
2,674 



5,250 
7,623 
1,241 



562,435 
445,788 



435,453 
358,418 



554,368 

259,604 

41,452 

(NA) 



15,445 

15,560 

8,552 



52,274 
62,145 

22,548 



7,559 
10,010 



58,212 
39,976 



115,095 
95,364 



116,561 
97,081 
81,287 
94,808 



10,825 
2,055 



11,3 
5,C 



491 
472 
617 



681 

917 

1,163 



1,679 
945 



59,846 
54,865 



59,465 
53,178 



26,372 
24,925 
17,655 
16,443 



5,069 
5,780 
2,005 



7,157 

5,831 
1,676 



1,998 
1,478 



9,066 
6,449 



^22,622 
21,448 



^17,127 
16,347 

9,115 
11,462 



1,425 
251 



936 
156 



100 

78 

55 



(NA) 
6,559 



,(NA) 
4,295 



5,036 

3,315 

1,726 

(NA) 



5,206 

5,599 

862 



279 
191 



2,567 

2,846 



*5,420 
5,420 



*6,729 
6,561 
2,i64 
1,563 



^269 
269 



467 
299 



167 

172 

31 



(NA) 
1,323 

(NA) 
1,270 



1,088 

1,017 

507 

(NA) 



1,546 

1,684 

292 



127 
148 



1,455 
1,268 



*2,851 
2,851 



*5,688 

3,568 

819 

(NA) 



V5 
175 



255 
155 



58 

4l 

(NA) 



24 

25 

(NA) 



115 
67 

5 



(NA) 
611 



(NA) 
605 



499 
490 
(NA) 
(NA) 



26,947 
27,862 
16,634 



109,470 

155,216 

58,621 



16,695 
25,978 



86,060 
90,081 



241,556 

202,446 



254,562 

214,799 

161,824 

(NA) 



20,679 
5,690 



23,155 
5,893 



879 
872 
(NA) 



1,277 

1,769 

(NA) 



1,554 

5,252 

(NA) 



85,591* 
75,652 



88,257 
75,680 



57,112 

56,555 

(NA) 

(NA) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



33 



Major Industry Group and Industry: 1958, 1954, 1939, and 1929 -Continued 

included for each year, see Introduction. For 1929, excludes data for service industries) 





Principal expenses designated 
($1,000) 


below 




Purchased 
machinery 
installed'' 

($1,000) 


Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 


EnerOT 
use? 

(million 
kwh 
equivalent) 




Wages and 


salaries 


Supplies 

and 
purchases 

for 
resale^ 


Purchased 

fuels= 


Purchased 

elec- 

tricity= 


Contract 
work= 


Develop- 
ment and 
explora- 
tion of 
mineral 
property* 


Prepara- 
tion 
plant and 
other con- 
struction^ 


New 

machinery 

and 
equipment^ 


Used plant 

and 
equipment^ 




Production 

and 

development 

workers 


Otlier 
employees^ 




75,759 
65,985 
15,212 


20,580 

21,074 

5,052 


46,026 

'^5,891 

8,655 


4.521 
1^964 
6,600 


1^,696 

5,190 

355 


44,985 

56,726 

5,984 


39,856 
65,752 

(NA) 


XXX 
XXX 
XXX 


55,566 

55,79^ 

1,461 


40,44l 
51,227 
10,620 


925 

2,958 

949 


142,150 

115,449 

54,979 


1 
2 
5 


259,528 

264,797 

56,020 


49,915 

59,515 

5,917 


241,491 

298,789 

(KA) 


40,942 

56,704 

(NA) 


1,261 
520 
(NA) 


51,566 

46,048 

(NA) 


84,457 

120,585 

(NA) 


12,955 

25,4l6 

(NA) 


5,522 

1,959 

(NA) 


68,149 

99,722 

(NA) 


17, 59** 

28,591 

(NA) 


22,617 

25,502 

(NA) 


4 
5 
6 


51,115 
40,815 


12,55'^ 
8,654 


16,596 
25,480 


3,S5 
5,586 


295 
106 


5,645 
6,547 


6,075 

6,537 


... 


55^ 
52 


6,207 
6,560 


521 
550 


949 
942 


I 


166,926 

147,047 


61,097 
40,820 


l't5,576 
109,507 


25,450 
18,579 


1,511 
777 


9,767 
9,751 


57,845 
49,485 


154 
528 


1^,625 
2,828 


54,815 
51,491 


2,620 
5,046 


7,177 
5,7W 


9 
10 


488,911 
409,596 


^11^,595 
157,506 


=572,945 
516,566 


=79,496 
78,707 


=48,o4o 
46,491 


=52,758 
51,898 


=151,820 
129,506 


*7,78l 
7,781 


340,657 
40,450 


=125, 024 
120,959 


^20,040 
19,828 


348,954 
48,455 


11 
12 


450,685 

565,604 

85,014 

116,691 


390,592 
86,4l6 
21,641 
51,608 


=275,172 

250,571 

58,065 

5^,519 


=61,702 
60,899 
14,966 
17,098 


=56,815 
55,551 
12,040 

15,5^7 


=46,020 

'^5,586 

2,270 

1,760 


= 155,875 

152,102 

(NA) 

20,8l4 


*9,510 

9,401 

(NA) 

5,155 


354,561 

54,054 

5,716 

(NA) 


=88,021 

86,808 

12,654 

(NA) 


317,085 

16,805 

2,820 

(NA) 


344,59^ 
45,792 
20,200 
28,605 


15 

14 
15 
16 


56,768 
6,067 


8,145 
1,054 


16,860 
2,252 


1,195 

4o4 


1,971 

422 


1,240 
580 


2,845 
551 


52 
52 


566 
559 


2,787 
702 


300 
88 


6l4 

155 


17 

18 


55,5.64 
7,958 


^,865 
687 


11,544 
2,482 


1,204 
401 


1,855 
389 


1,208 
574 


2,664 
891 


178 
69 


595 
86 


1,79^ 
581 


491 
211 


744 

142 


19 
20 


1,592 

1,429 

652 


528 

127 

89 


585 
586 

80 


87 
87 
56 


78 
54 
53 


91 
52 

4 


294 
158 
(NA) 


15 
(NA) 


70 
"'5 


588 
89 
18 


29 
56 
10 


53 
54 
39 


21 
22 
25 


2,046 
2,4o4 
1,297 


242 
255 
182 


1,295 
695 
533 


115 
96 
67 


171 
229 

200 


41 

l49 

l4 


89 
226 
(NA) 


52 

50 

(NA) 


51 
5 

14 


122 

157 

50 


12 
55 

21 


58 
55 
77 


24 
25 
26 


2,429 

i*,105 

750 


284 

525 

77 


574 

1,205 

146 


202 

218 

89 


175 

106 

57 


248 

575 

14 


148 
507 
(NA) 


5 

59 

(NA) 


258 
81 


192 
555 

10 


47 

122 

11 


64 

73 

159 


27 
28 
29 


170,407 
147,266 


(NA) 
41,155 


=155,108 
155,022 


=21,809 
21,809 


=14,515 
14,515 


=16, 241 
16, 241 


(NA) 
51,258- 


(NA) 

1,959 


(NA) 
16,161 


(NA) 
45,772 


(NA) 
6,828 


(NA) 
8,507 


50 

31 


146,149 
122,755 


(NA) 
22,759 


=108,772 
86,960 


=16,081 
16,081 


=11,871 
11,871 


=10,754 
10, 75^^ 


(NA) 
44,751 


(NA) 

1,587 


(NA) 

11,918 


(NA) 

26,547 


(NA) 
5,576 


(NA) 
6,897 


32 
55 


111,255 
90,715 
17,064 


52,105 

17,105 

5,850 

(NA) 


97,175 

58,726 

7,720 

12,695 


17,442 

11,913 

2,755 

2,599 


10,881 
8,654 
2,780 
2,592 


12,555 

7,556 

507 

(NA) 


58,894 

52,622 

(NA) 

(NA) 


1,752 

1,219 

(NA) 

(NA) 


12,411 

7,658 

(NA) 

(NA) 


54,801 

19,155 

(NA) 

(NA) 


5,570 

5,965 

(NA) 

(NA) 


6,878 

4,956 

(NA) 

(NA) 


3h 
55 
56 
57 



34 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 



Table 4— Selected Statistics for Mineral Operations in the United States,' by 

(For explanation of column captions and for statement on the minimum size of establishments 



Major industry group, industry, 
and year 



Number 

of 
oper- 
ating 
com- 
panies 



Establishments, number 



Total 



Includ- 
ing 
mining 
opera - 
tions'"' 



Includ- 
ing 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 



Value of 

net 
shipments 

and 
receipts^ 



($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Number of persons engaged 



Produc - 
tion and 
develop- 
ment 
workers 



Other 
em- 
ployees^ 



Proprietors and 
firm members* 



Per- 
forming 
manual 

labor 



Man-hours 
v/orked by 
production 

and 
development 
workers 



(1,000) 



9 
10 
11 
12 



13 
l4 
15 
16 



17 
18 
19 

20 



21 
22 
23 

2k 



25 
26 
27 



28 

29 

30 

31 
32 
33 



:>k 

35 
36 
37 



38 
39 

ko 
kl 



h2 
1^5 



Nonmetallic minerals mining — 

Continued 

Crushed and broken stone — Continued 
Mineral industry only — Continued 
Crushed and broken granite: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

1929 

Crushed and broken stone, nee; 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

Sand and gravel: 
1958: 

Including operations in 

manufactures 

Mineral industry only 

195l|- (mineral industry only).... 

1939 

1929 

Common sand and gravel (mineral 
subindustry only): 

1958 

195^ 

1959 

1929 

Glass sand: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

1929 

Molding sand: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

1929 

Bentonite : 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

Fire clay: 
1958: 

Including operations in 

manufactures 

Mineral industry only 

195^: 

Including operations in 

manufactures 

Mineral industry only 

1939ij, 

1929 

Fiiller's earth: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

1929 

Kaolin and ball clay: 

1958 

195^: 

Including operations in 
manufactures 

Mineral industry only 

1959 

Feldspar: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

1929 

See footnotes at end of table. 



87 

75 

59 

(NA) 



33'+ 
273 
229 



3,690 
3,350 
3,3'+0 
1,253 
(NA.) 



3,213 
3,196 
1,129 

(NA.) 



39 
40 

32 

(NA) 



105 

97 

(NA) 



235 
136 



279 
180 

200 
(NA) 



13 

15 

21 

(NA) 



\\ 



6k 

58 

kl 

(NA) 



121 

101 

(NA) 



378 
363 
(NA) 



14-, 0814- 
3,703 
3,931 
1,569 
1,072 



b,^k 
3,756 
1,383 

957 



124 

131 

l46 

90 



1*1 

k3 

(NA) 



317 
182 



353 
248 
(NA) 
199 



Ik 

16 

(NA) 

22 



53 



62 

54 

(NA) 



74 

84 

(NA) 

51 



121 
99 
79 



369 
262 



4,071 
3,690 
3,949 
1,563 
1,325 



3,524 
3,766 
1,380 
1,165 

42 
44 
39 
32 



124 

139 

144 
128 



317 
182 



357 
252 
306 
236 



S 



74 

110 

59 



108 
88 
74 

(NA) 



318 
315 
233 



2,758 
2,758 
3,309 
1,528 
(NA) 



2,618 

3,156 

1,383 

(NA) 



39 

38 

40 

(NA) 



101 

115 

105 

(NA) 



61 
61 

44 

(NA) 



U 

13 

18 

(NA) 



43 



12 

22 

2 

(NA) 



49,391 

■^30,875 

7,030 

6,751 



106,054 

■^106,606 

17,412 



622,885 
552,206 
455,464 
79,403 
112,447 



508,256 

"^435,662 

69,130 

102,312 



^28,343 

•"18,591 

6,137 

5,359 



•"16,373 

■^11,762 

4,136 

4,776 



"16,843 

■"21,830 

1,982 



32,759 
18,421 



31,659 
22,046 

7,178 

10,753 



■^8,692 
6,012 
2,107 
4,812 

■^42,434 

34,4lO 

31,878 

7,239 



6,433 

6,239 

981 

1,935 



33,493 

22,201 

5,042 

4,871 



77,927 
76,613 
12,891 



497,864 

434,468 

356,729 

61,935 

89,235 



401,700 

334,046 

53,870 

81,159 



20,672 

13,701 

4,625 

4,082 



12,096 
8,982 
3,440 
3,994 



12,220 

16,350 

1,1+65 



25,848 
l4,54o 



24,335 

17,468 

6,168 

8,469 



5,955 
4,179 
1,402 
3,589 



30,990 



26,748 

25,249 

5,437 



4,531 

4,048 

859 

1,599 



2,906 
2,344 
2,100 

2,066 



5,587 
5,909 

4,355 



33,171 
30,630 
30,533 
16,959 
18,061 



28,268 
28,423 
14,584 
15, 99*+ 



1,339 
1,144 
1,280 
1,030 



1,023 

966 

1,095 

1,037 



543 
578 
357 



2,084 
1,279 



3,011 
1,802 
3,655 
4,139 



527 
510 
562 
991 



2,722 

2,843 
2,820 
3,168 

496 
579 
512 



403 
206 
232 
(NA) 



1,100 
772 
507 



(NA) 

6,4i8 
5,933 
2,818 
5,967 



5,896 
5,667 
2,445 
3,672 



289 

151 

242 

95 



233 
115 
151 
200 



145 
56 
62 



(NA) 

194 



(NA) 
185 
255 
363 



125 

54 

116 

105 



672 



(NA) 
528 
266 



32 

55 

22 
(NA) 



203 

198 

79 



(NA) 
2,957 

3,523 
796 
268 



2,869 

3,408 
711 

249 



(NA) 
122 



(NA) 

167 

108 

72 



(NA) 
19 
26 



14 

24 

10 

(NA) 



34 



(NA) 

1,592 

1,913 

290 

(NA) 



1,536 

1,852 

253 

(NA) 



11 

1 

(NA) 



48 

50 

36 

(NA) 



(NA) 
59 



(NA) 
74 
41 

(NA) 



(NA) 
7 
3 

44 

70 

21 

(NA) 



6,442 

5,607 
4,574 

(NA) 



12,078 
13,738 



71,562 
66,480 
70,103 
35,785 
(NA) 



61,733 

65,600 
31,324 

(NA) 



2,833 

2,505 

2,667 

(NA) 



1,914 

1,998 

1,794 

(NA) 



I,l40 

1,340 

687 



3,824 
2,214 



5,542 
3,123 

5,642 
(NA) 



1,145 

1,109 

1,051 

(NA) 



5,675 



6,205 
6,159 
5,987 



1,028 

1,235 

1,016 

(NA) 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



35 



Major Industry Group :ind Industry: 1958, 1954, 1939, and 1929-Continucd 

included for each year, see Introduction. For 1929, excludes data for service Industries) 



Principal expenses designated below 
($1,000) 



Wa^es and salaries 



Production 

and 

development 

workers 



Other 
employees 



Supplies 

and 
pure liases 

for 
resale^ 



Purcliased 
fuels^ 



Purcliased 
elec- 
tricity^ 



Contract 
work^ 



Purchased 
machinery 
Installed^ 



($1,000) 



Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 



Develop- 
ment and 
■ explora- 
tion of 
mineral 
property* 



Prepara- 
tion 
plant and 
otlier con- 
struction^ 



New 
machinery 

and 
equipment^ 



Used plant 

and 
equipment^ 



Energy 
used^ 



(million 
kwh 
equivalent) 



10,771 
7,573 
1,78s 
2,162 



25,21+0 

24,1+1+5 

i+,806 



11+5,1+60 

154,¥+1 

U8,966 

18,822 

25,585 



12l+,802 

111,600 
16,1+82 
22,780 



5,730 

l+,279 
1,456 
1,311+ 



3,909 

3,087 

881+ 

1,291 



1,996 

1,920 

309 



8,606 
1+.989 



9,7^ 
5,670 
3,366 
3,758 



1,673 

1,381 

1+58 

853 



9,719 



8,171+ 
8,115 
1,^0 



1,515 
1,523 

383 
527 



2,20l+ 

1,306 

573 

(NA) 



6,828 
l+,330 
1,158 



ink) 

37,885 

28,51+7 

6,393 

11,630 



54,582 

26,958 

5,1+47 

10,71+6 



1,767 
819 
600 
278 



1,S6 
570 
3I+6 
606 



215 
137 



'1,031 
1,051 



(NA.) 
928 
1+99 
81+1 



726 
363 
308 
303 



4,295 



ink) 

1,828 

637 



km 
199 
113 
203 



12,351 

^6,506 

1,405 

1,273 



23,496 

°22,271 

2,904 



=96,056 

88,753 

61,617 

8,493 

12,946 



81,010 

57,481 

7,432 

11,917 



^5,520 

3,208 

747 

675 



32,300 
928 
314 
354 



S2,4o6 

^2,916 

396 



=5,148 
2,118 



=4,729 

1,983 

622 

1,494 



'1,754 
840 
374 
425 



'8,739 



=4,609 
4,576 



1,055 

1,400 

81 

239 



674 
747 
225 
209 



3,693 
3,421 



=25,342 

25,342 

21,375 

4,632 

4,452 



25,085 

19,758 

4,156 

3,990 



1,265 
840 
522 
282 



992 
775 
154 
180 



720 

468 
59 



^1,090 
1,090 



=659 
659 
115 
525 



748 
538 
164 
385 



2,157 



=1,524 

1,524 

550 



524 

238 

28 

21 



1,309 
838 
334 
359 



2,325 

2,599 

849 



=14,099 

14,099 

9,997 

3,805 

5,353 



12,471 
8,797 
3,273 
4,921 



1,084 
807 
566 
305 



544 
393 
166 
127 



590 
505 

26 



1,194 



"857 
857 
24 1 



396 

502 

8 

62 



654 

729 

26 

(NA) 



3,052 
2,669 



=15,367 

15,367 

14,692 

538 

461 



14,672 

13,919 

399 

325 



l45 

166 

77 

15 



550 

607 

62 

121 



1,181 

1,829 

38 



=264 
264 


=830 
830 


^05 
305 
130 

245 


=1,686 

1,686 

145 

20 


270 

218 

95 

62 


281 

223 

72 

351 



592 



=1,562 

1,362 

135 



156 
365 

5 
14 



5,838 

3,041 

(NA) 

(NA) 



6,506 

9,088 

(NA) 



(NA) 
58,469 
47,694 

(NA) 
7,963 



35,177 

45,825 

(NA) 

7,174 



2,360 
965 
(HA) 
453 



932 
904 
(NA) 
356 



1,009 
604 
(NA) 



(NA) 
1,695 



(NA) 

1,292 

(NA) 

459 



265 
539 
(NA) 



2,913 



(NA) 

2,601 

(NA) 



1,277 

294 

(NA) 

28 



61 

13 

(NA) 

(NA) 



l46 
155 
(NA) 



(NA) 

1,842 

1,649 

(NA) 

62 



1,808 

1,573 

(NA) 



19 
34 

(NA) 

50 



15 

42 

(NA) 

12 



125 

15 

(NA) 



(NA) 
189 



(NA) 
79 

(NA) 
94 



25 

(NA) 
90 

530 



(NA) 
109 
(NA) 



22 

36 

(NA) 

32 



948 

844 

75 

(NA) 



2,802 

3,456 

194 



(NA) 

14,894 

7,866 

1,029 

(NA) 



13,569 
7,420 

870 

(NA) 



1,012 
258 
124 
(NA) 



313 

188 

35 

(NA) 



(NA) 

155 



(NA) 
184 

34 

(NA) 



231 

84 

17 

(NA) 



1,053 



(NA) 

1,449 

203 



208 

94 

7 

(NA) 



3,510 

1,841 

210 

(NA) 



5,661 

5,353 

484 



(NA) 

28,975 

28,558 

4,238 

(NA) 



26,634 

27,254 

3,752 

(NA) 



1,656 
789 
319 
(NA) 



685 
515 
167 
(NA) 



946 

392 

65 



(NA) 
1,562 



(NA) 
925 
112 

(NA) 



321 

4l5 

61 

(NA) 



2,676 



(NA) 

2,733 

958 



1,053 

259 

37 

(NA) 



384 

489 

50 

(NA) 



1,074 

924 
163 



(NA) 

10,851 

8,014 

1,064 

(NA) 



10,807 

7,917 

1,028 

(NA) 



16 

15 

5 

(NA) 



28 

8e 
31 

(NA) 



154 
40 



(NA) 
203 



(NA) 

139 

41 

(NA) 



2 

28 

7 

(NA) 



92 



384 
282 
166 

(NA) 



1,045 

1,659 

487 



(NA) 
8,596 
9,057 
4,281 
6,681 



7,249 
7,978 
5,645 
5,832 



966 

746 
496 
542 



381 
333 
l4o 

307 



576 

369 

81 



1,453 



9 

10 

11 

12 



21 
22 
23 
24 



25 
26 
27 



(NA) 
582 


28 
29 


(NA) 
500 
127 
944 


30 
31 
32 
33 


325 
296 

185 
411 


34 
35 
36 
37 



(NA) 


(NA) 


59 




1,134 


40 


59 


750 


41 


23 


127 


42 


19 


102 


45 


2 


6 


44 


(NA) 


25 


45 



38 



36 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 



Table 4— Selected Statistics for Mineral Operations in the United States, by 

(For explanation of column captions eind for statement on the minimum size of establishments 



Major industry group, industry, 
and year 



Number 

of 
oper- 
ating 
com- 
panies 



Establishments, number 



Includ- 


Inolud 


ing 


ing 


mining 


prepa- 


opera- 


ration 


tions-^ 


plants 



Value of 

net 
shipments 

and 
receipts^ 



($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Number of persons engaged 



Produc- 
tion and 
develop- 
ment 
workers 



Other 
em- 
ployees^ 



Proprietors and 
firm members* 



Total 



Per- 
forming 
manual 

labor 



Man-hours 
worked by 
production 

and 
development 
workers 



(1,000) 



Nonmetallic minerals mining - 
Continued 

Magnesite and brucite: 

1958 

195^ 

1959 

1929 



Clay and related minerals, nee: 
1958: 

Including operations in 

manufactures 

Mineral industry only 

195't: 

Including operations in 

manufactures 

Mineral industry only 

1959 



Barite: 
1958. 
195^. 
1959. 
1929. 



Fluorspar : 
1958.... 
195^.... 
1959.- •• 
1929.... 



Potash, soda, borate minerals: 

1958 

195^ 

1959 



Phosphate rock: 

1958 

195^ 

1959 

1929 



Rock salt: 
1958.... 
195ii-.... 
1959---- 



Sulfur: 
1958.. 
195^.. 
1959.. 
1929.. 



Chemical-fertilizer mining, nee: 
1958 

195^ii 

1959^^ 



Nonmetallic minerals services: 

1958 

195^ 

1959 



Gypsum: 
1958: 

Including operations in 

manufactures 

Mineral industry only... 
195^: 

Including operations in 

manufactures 

Mineral industry only. . . 

1959 

1929 



Mica: 
1958. 
195^. 
1959. 
1929. 



k 

k 

5 

(NA) 



525 
109 



67k 
169 
524 



kl 
56 

57 
(NA) 



50 

9k 

60 

(NA) 



k3 

55 

55 

(NA) 



k 

k 

(NA) 

5 



122 



801 
183 
(NA) 



55 

k2 
(NA) 
(NA) 



55 

104 

(NA) 

28 



21 

20 

(NA) 



65 

75 

(NA) 

26 



18 


22 


11 


15 


17 


(NA) 


Ik 


2k 


12 


20 


8 


(NA) 


(NA) 


9 


28 


51 


56 


59 


8 




7k 


75 


62 


62 


65 


65 


56 


6k 


29 


52 


58 


6k 


54 


57 


54 


(NA) 


(NA) 


60 


ite 


1^9 


kk6 


498 


22 


(NA) 


(NA) 


2k 



699 

122 



802 
184 

617 



51 

105 

61 

56 



XXX 
XXX 
XXX 



14-9 

510 

21 

32 



5 

1 

1 

(NA) 



58 



55 

55 

52 

(NA) 



27 

35 

55 

(NA) 



44 

54 

50 

(NA) 



5 

5 

2 

(NA) 



XXX 
XXX 
XXX 



22 

22 

25 

(NA) 



56 

444 

10 

(NA) 



7,270 
1,655 
1,596 

2,044 



^58,525 
■^22,004 



739,058 

■^15,504 
6,481 



■^15,768 

18,269 

2,065 

1,802 



16,639 

15,755 

5,597 

2,858 



■^141,115 

^107,757 

17,051 



99,109 
82,585 
12,286 
15,044 



■741,815 

55,581 

6,896 



106,202 

l4o,685 

31,812 

57,126 



^9,643 

■^21,780 

602 



7,954 

6,301 

966 



54,172 
7,048 



731,861 

■^6,631 

4,569 

5,740 



6,216 

4,092 

527 

516 



5,978 
1,572 
1,289 
1,448 



43 ,432 
15,154 



29,109 
9,785 
5,124 



11,521 

14,051 

1,652 

1,489 



12,655 
9,914 
2,655 
2,058 



111,082 
82,215 
15,550 



64,375 

62,089 

9,003 

9,497 



54,073 

50,013 

5,721 



94,063 

124,166 

28,863 

29,502 



7,586 

18,074 

458 



6,217 

4,884 

725 



29,755 
5,958 



27,642 
5,552 
5,756 
4,516 



4,974 

5,284 

276 

4l5 



267 
121 
216 
551 



5,255 
1,464 



5,655 
1,055 
2,989 



781 

1,036 

792 

844 



1,044 

997 

1,287 

1,053 



4,590 
4,738 
2,049 



3,955 
4,579 
5,572 
5,201 



1,602 
1,659 
1,380 



2,305 
5,077 
1,517 
2,199 



557 

1,209 

189 



1,057 
6l4 
507 



1,219 
554 



1,428 

399 

1,527 

2,078 



649 
668 
190 
226 



(NA) 
198 

(NA) 
98 
77 

148 
89 
62 
71 



191 
265 
109 

118 



2,071 

1,584 

389 



1,438 
861 
582 
505 



382 
266 
181 



1,31k 

1,018 

507 

505 



120 

255 

15 



(NA) 
52 



(NA) 

50 

97 

154 



(NA) 
51 



(NA) 
99 
78 



66 

114 

49 

15 



(NA) 
30 



(NA) 
50 



19 

18 

4 

(NA) 



27 

8e 

15 

(NA) 



27 

44 

12 

2 


14 
21 

(NA) 


7 
5 
4 


4 

1 
4 


2 


... 


1 

1 


1 
(NA) 


5 

15 

5 


2 

7 

1 


79 
67 
68 


44 
26 
27 


(NA) 
20 


(NA) 
10 


(NA) 
21 

7 
2 


(NA) 

7 

(NA) 


189 
549 

11 

1 


115 

432 

7 

(NA) 



428 
257 
437 
(NA) 



6,804 
3,267 



7,575 
2,174 
5,646 



1,588 

2,403 

1,439 

(NA) 



2,105 

2,001 

2,568 

(NA) 



9,212 
9,581 
4,388 



8,255 

10,119 

6,680 

(NA) 



3,508 
3,861 
2,608 



4,644 

6,229 

3,031 

(NA) 



1,093 
2,424 

348 



1,895 

1,258 

652 



2,506 
776 



2,984 

926 

2,466 

(NA) 



1,204 

1,196 
561 

(NA) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



37 



Major Industry Group and Industry: 1958, 1954, 1939, and 1929— Continued 

included for each year, see Introduction. For 1929, excludes data for service industries) 





Prlncipja expenses deslgnateci 


below 








Capital expenditures 






~~~ 






($1,000) 










($1,000) 








Wages and salaries 
























Supplies 

and 
pure liases 

for 
resale^ 


Purchased 
fuels= 


Purcliased 

elec- 

tricity= 


Contract 
worl£= 


Purchased 
machinery 
instaUed^ 


Develop- 
ment and 
explora- 
tion of 
mineral 
property* 


Prepara- 
tion 
plant and 
other con- 
struction^ 


New 
machinery 

and 
equipment^ 


Used plant 

and 
equipment'' 


EnerpT 
used* 

(million 
kwh 




Production 

and 

development 

workers 


Other 
employees^ 
















($1,000) 










equivalent) 




1,386 


559 


1,010 


794 


220 


145 


114 




954 


55 




391 


1 


1*69 


70 


212 


52 


59 




17 


• • • 




17 




16 


2 


300 


24 


80 


5 


U 


11 


(NA) 


(NA) 


1 


58 


1 


2 


5 


lt66 


88 


252 


251 


57 


56 


44 


24 


(MA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


247 


4 


12,656 


(NA) 


=10,698 


=3,772 


=851 


=681 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


5 


5,602 


1,5» 


4,455 


5,772 


851 


681 


2,075 


62 


902 


1,885 


155 


2,245 


6 


11,1^7'* 


(NA) 


^7,829 


=1,212 


=389 


=1,190 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


7 


3,"* 12 


411 


^1,621 


1,212 


389 


1,190 


1,161 


48 


699 


970 


155 


1,126 


8 


2,861 


125 


647 


592 


219 


99 


(NA) 


(NA) 


41 


164 


86 


425 


9 


2,698 


704 


^1,955 


281 


554 


581 


251 


204 


426 


307 


56 


198 


10 


5,'*51 


423 


2,251 


327 


552 


850 


1,250 


24 


78 


853 


57 


269 


11 


597 


155 


246 


94 


52 


21 


(NA) 


(NA) 


31 


57 


39 


56 


12 


6k8 


186 


155 


58 


76 


24 


154 


12 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


84 


15 


1^,556 


1,280 


2,504 


565 


594 


1,127 


764 


627 


160 


702 


77 


579 


14 


5,1+51 


1,415 


2,195 


495 


515 


804 


561 


l4o 


145 


429 


35 


380 


15 


1,151* 


228 


506 


118 


61 


57 


(NA) 


(NA) 


106 


429 


27 


358 


16 


1,112 


290 


626 


155 


24 


17 


l40 


157 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


587 


17 


26,746 


14,521 


®22,643 


7,144 


3,026 


1,677 


6,936 


608 


1,557 


8,994 


234 


8,452 


18 


23,028 


10,Uu 


^17,529 


5,594 


1,641 


1,646 


8,390 


525 


1,599 


6,866 


66 


5,812 


19 


3,1^5 


1,511 


2,036 


1,425 


198 


42 


(NA) 


(NA) 


377 


675 


16 


2,231 


20 


17,185 


10,025 


12,776 


5,562 


6,729 


2,595 


6,095 


426 


507 


4,916 


55 


5,120 


21 


17,089 


4,440 


11,917 


5,548 


5,507 


2,904 


8,156 


1,083 


2,484 


7,662 


109 


2,990 


22 


2,871 


858 


1,503 


826 


931 


25 


(NA) 


(NA) 


109 


425 


46 


1,513 


25 


3,50if 


778 


1,543 


891 


1,092 


21 


805 


190 


(MA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


1,648 


24 


7,957 


5,059 


°7,363 


511 


455 


9i 


2,125 


9 


480 


2,118 




4l6 


25 


7,117 


1,454 


5,551 


555 


567 


244 


1,554 


55 


873 


1,259 


1 


549 


26 


l,'+3l+ 

15,267 
14,619 


540 

11,503 
6,567 


868 

7,565 
14,055 


155 

6,440 
5,629 


151 

45 
44 


5 

7,496 
2,833 


(NA) 

7,077 
2,803 


(NA) 


149 


143 


69 


536 

11,819 
12,854 


27 


16,282 


28 


5,069 


5,110 2,635 


51^ 


29 


2,545 


1,911 


1,690 


1,128 


15 


116 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


252 


44 


4,129 


50 


5,483 

2,558 

4,569 


955 

757 
1,557 


5,540 

®2,005 
^,775 


4,435 

151 
195 


41 

238 
594 


10 

165 

459 


1,634 

125 
5,560 


525 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


7,518 

80 
223 


51 


607 


52 


255 


1,572 2,795 


50- 


55 


20I*- 


57 


95 


7 


54 


8 


(NA) 


(NA) 


5 


15 


... 


6 


54 


5,058 


484 


1,289 


579 


51 


146 


700 


XXX 


74 


705 


69 


105 


55 


2,2l4 
520 


115 
48 


1,088 
124 


554 
115 


11 
4 


215 
(NA) 


402 
(NA) 


XXX 
XXX 


IQ ';o6 


56, 


96 

(MA) 


56 


55 


37 


5,264 


(NA) 


=4,304 


=166 


=118 


=75 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


58 


1,481 


524 


975 


166 


118 


75 


578 


28 


69 


682 


41 


74 


59 


5,572 


(NA) 


= ^864 
*924 


=171 


=l40 


=72 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(MA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


40 


1,567 


285 


171 


l40 


72 


2,595 


15 


48 


402 


1,960 


85 


41 


1,640 


217 


624 


57 


146 


6 


(NA) 


(NA) 


27 


254 


22 


29 


42 


2,62a 


507 


795 


157 


285 


7 


578 


127 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


172 


45 


1,709 


298 


995 


556 


206 


304 


577 


515 


218 


434 


204 


115 


44 


1,255 


87 


564 


151 


152 


347 


474 


255 


188 


321 


96 


58 


45 


118 


20 


25 


10 


16 




(NA) 


(NA) 


1 


6 


2 


6 


1*6 


195 


58 


65 


18 


18 


... 


6 


14 


(NA) 


(MA) 


(NA) 


20 


47 



38 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 



Tabic 4— Selected Statistics for Mineral Operations in the United States, by 

(For explanation of column captions and for statement on the minimum size of establishments 



Major industry group, industry, 
and year 



Number 

of 
oper- 
ating 
com- 
panies 



Establishments , number 



Includ- 


Includ 


ing 


ing 


mining 


prepa- 


opera- 


ration 


tions""" 


plants 



Value of 

net 
shipments 

and 
receipts^ 



($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Number of persons engaged 



Produc- 
tion and 
develop- 
ment 
workers 



Other 
em- 
ployees^ 



Proprietors and 
firm members* 



Total 



Per- 
forming 
manual 

labor 



Man-hours 
v/orked by 
production 

and 
development 
workers 



(1,000) 



Nonmetallic minerals mining -- 
Continued 

Native asphalt and bitumens: 

1958 

195^ 

1959 

1929 

Pumice and pumicite: 

1958 

195^ 

1959 

Talc, soapstone, and pyrophyllite 

1958 

195^ 

1959 

1929 

Natural abrasives, except sand: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

Peat: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 

Nonmetallic minerals, nee: 

1958 

195^ 

1939 



9 
23 

(NA) 



29 
(NA) 



10 

12 

(NA) 

21 



6k 
75 
17 

6k 

68 

(NA) 

25 



20 

22 

(NA) 



81 

88 

(NA) 



55 

70 

(NA) 



15 
(NA) 



28 
kj 

Ik 



23 

39 

26 

(NA) 



16 

Ik 
25 



60 
68 
23 



39 
57 
30 



8,04-1 
6,kzk 
2,968 
5,12't 



5,002 

"^3,393 

587 



■^ll^,908 

11,563 

3,269 

2,688 



3,373 
3,it90 
1,335 



1^,370 

2^326 

378 



■^31,611 

2'f,595 

3,041 



5,95^ 
4,857 
2,55^ 
4,345 



4,058 

2,74l 

301 



11,755 
9,486 
2,44l 
2,012 



2,648 
2,874 
1,115 



3,640 

1,800 

338 



23,368 

17,437 

2,153 



367 

451 

730 

1,3^3 



271 
223 

122 



1,123 

1,297 

970 

550 



204 
197 



335 
321 
157 



1,3'A 

1,374 

630 



97 
100 
123 
1^ 



171 
174 
167 



44.7 
394 
104 



5 

1 
(NA) 



732 

987 

1,330 

(NA) 



409 
440 
197 



2,289 

2,778 

2,068 

(NA) 



408 
403 
798 



613 
637 
246 



3,018 
2,703 
1,395 



In addition, for 1954, about 
The comparable figure for 1939 

includes the estimated value 



NA Not available. 

"""For 195''- and earlier years, except for the Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Industry, represents number of mines. 
1,400 oil and gas field service establishment reports incliided oil or gas mining operations as a secondary activity, 
is not available. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, 
of minerals produced and used in the same manufacturing establishment in making manufactured products. 

^For 1958 and 195'*, excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

*For 1958, excludes data for all mining operations in manufacturing establishments. For 1954, see footnote 3. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments in 1958 and 1954, the cost of 
purchased fuels, purchased electricity, and contract work is included with the cost of supplies. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



i9 



Major Industry Group and Industry: 1958, 1954, 1939, and 1 929— Continued 
Included for each year, see Introduction. For 1929* excludes data for service industries) 





Principal expenses designated 


below 








Capital expenditures 












($1,000) 










($1,000) 








Wages and salaries 
























Supplies 

and 
purciiases 

for 
resale^ 


Pui'ohased 
fuels^ 


Purchased 

elec- 
tricity^ 


Contract 
work^ 


Purchased 
macliinery 
installed^ 


Develop- 
ment and 
explora- 
tion of 
mineral 
property* 


Prepara- 
tion 
plant and 
other con- 
struction^ 


New 
machinery 

and 
equipment^ 


Used plant 

and 
equipment^ 


Energy 
used^ 

(million 
kwh 




Production 

and 
development 
workers 


Otter 
employees^ 
















($1,000) 










equivalent) 




1,398 


867 


1,558 


79 


270 


4o6 


517 


175 


19 


510 


19 


50 


1 


1,W*5 


70lt 


1,251 


137 


85 


170 


476 


114 


24 


402 


12 


66 


2 


6o8 


28I+ 


317 


68 


28 


1 


(MA) 


(NA) 


26 


72 


17 


125 


5 


1,255 


586 


518 


138 


39 


84 


182 


59 


(NA) 


(NA) 


182 


285 


4 


907 


196 


760 


270 


68 


159 


267 


54 


212 


205 


109 


111 


5 


71^8 


214 


^554 


119 


40 


276 


298 


32 


98 


99 


186 


56 


6 


119 


7 


45 


30 


11 


... 


(NA) 


(NA) 


4 


9 


4 


19 


7 


^,151 


1,163 


^2,428 


291 


547 


276 


509 


128 


169 


482 


119 


153 


8 


h,-Lk\ 


799 


1,671 


238 


467 


4l2 


486 


300 


455 


407 


37 


135 


9 


807 


382 


619 


45 


162 


2 


(NA) 


(NA) 


62 


65 


38 


53 


10 


615 


217 


551 


29 


99 


17 


35 


57 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


59 


11 


801 


206 


513 


181 


22 


70 


88 


1 


42 


106 




73 


12 


698 


187 


504 


161 


33 


139 


73 


10 


240 


74 


"a 


75 


13 


5^6 


133 


\k^ 


50 


21 


... 


(NA.) 


(NA) 


50 


51 


7 


109 


14 


974 


308 


762 


174 


34 


134 


446 


137 


111 


455 


108 


79 


15 


829 


111 


321 


174 


31 


46 


159 


34 


43 


io4 


24 


87 


16 


101 


43 


21 


15 


4 


... 


(NA) 


(NA) 


8 


10 


8 


7 


17 


5,950 


2,660 


86,264 


1,239 


915 


1,144 


2,869 


198 


982 


2,729 


279 


716 


18 


5,258 


2,062 


4,649 


967 


722 


1,336 


1,441 


109 


8eo 


1,001 


27 


620 


19 


636 


209 


593 


159 


128 


8 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


64 


4 


197 


20 



Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 
^Represents gross value of shipments and receipts 

Includes the cost of minerals received for preparation. 
^Excludes data for common clay and shale operations. 

Represents combined figures for the Fire Clay Industry, the Kaolin and Ball Clay Industry, and the Clay and Related Minerals, NEC, Industry. 

Except for number of establishments, excludes data for 2 lithium minerals mines. 



40 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 



Table 5— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Divisions, 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction. For more detailed historical statistics 



Division, State, and year 



Establishments , 
number 



Total^ 



With 20 

or more 

employees 



All employees 



Payroll 



($1,000) 



Production and development 
workers 



Number 



Man-hours 



(1,000) 



Wages 



($1,000) 



29 
30 

31 
32 
33 

34 
35 
36 

37 
38 
39 

AQ 
41 
42 



UNITED STATES 

Mineral industries only: 

1958 

1954 

Including operations in manufactures: 

1958 , 

1954'' , 

1939^ , 

DIVISIONS AND STATES 

New England: 

Mineral industries only: 

1958 

1954 , 



Including operations in manufactures: 

1958 

19547 

1939^ 



Maine: 

1958 

1954 '7 

1939^ 

New Hampshire: 

1958 

1954 '7 

1939^ 

Vermont: 

1958 

1954 '7 

1939^ 



Massachusetts: 

1958 

19547 

1939^ 

Rhode Island: 

1958 

19547 

1939* 



Connecticut: 

1958 

19547 

1939* 



Middle Atlantic: 

Mineral industries only: 

1958 

1954 



Including operations in manufactures: 

1958 

19547 

1939* 



New York: 

1958 

19547. _ _ _ 
1939* 

New Jersey: 

1958 

19547. . . . 
1939* 



Pernisylvania: 
1958 



36,218 
37,446 

37,784 
38,663 
25,023 



344 
385 

443 
456 
332 



77 
34 

45 
44 
25 

67 
62 
77 

144 
148 
112 



22 
21 
21 

97 

104 

63 



4,500 
5,320 



4,750 
5,541 
3,953 

622 
694 
518 

150 
166 
137 

3,978 
4,681 
3,298 



6,029 
6,194 



6,279 

6,456 

(NA) 



39 

40 

58 

56 

(NA) 

7 

10 

(NA) 

4 

4 

(NA) 

16 

16 

(NA) 

15 

16 

(NA) 

4 

3 

(NA) 

12 

7 

(NA) 



636 
782 

683 

842 

(NA) 

82 

80 

(NA) 

44 

41 

(NA) 

557 
721 
(MA) 



732,632 
785,708 



753,537 
805,968 
856,389 



3,616 
4,069 

6,521 

r5,988 
4,944 

580 
699 
420 

328 

319 
307 

2,571 
2,050 
1,695 

1,903 

rl,92't 

1,568 



212 
163 
248 

927 
833 
706 



87,398 

120,795 

90,387 
124,321 
219,481 

10,460 

12,364 

8,737 

3,859 
4,190 
3,978 

76,068 
107,767 
206,766 



3,740,288 
3,385,722 



3,826,692 
3,456,979 
1,174,771 



17,477 
15,683 

29,670 

23,142 

6,603 

2,000 

2,268 

448 

1,534 

1,108 

353 

10,019 
7,445 
2,016 

10,281 
8,074 
2,528 

897 
565 
323 

4,939 

3,682 

935 



418,758 
483,943 



431,426 
497,033 
297,502 

60,533 
66,310 
15,430 

19,955 

18,769 

5,926 

350,938 
411,954 
276,146 



564,281 
647,141 



584,012 
666,621 
774,130 



2,745 
3,456 

5,230 

r5,232 

4,272 



530 
653 
379 

282 
285 

266 

2,157 
1,881 
1,574 

1,357 

rl,626 

1,206 

174 
140 
212 

730 
647 
635 



72,795 
105,017 



75,702 
108,461 
203,871 

7,177 
8,469 
7,044 

2,923 
3,543 
3,369 

65,602 

96,4^9 

193,458 



1,077,864 
1,248,898 



1,116,774 
1,288,461 
1,287,852 



5,744 
7,581 

10,852 

11,149 

8,659 

1,079 

1,330 

659 

579 
574 
535 



4,445 
4,009 
3,148 

2,826 
3,382 
2,512 

322 
274 
435 

1,601 
1,580 
1,370 



124,374 
177,172 

130,121 
184,141 
317,732 

15,142 
18,612 
14,682 



5,814 
7,948 
6,451 

109,165 
157,581 
296,599 



2,616,273 
2,572,297 



2,695,588 

2,639,378 

970,546 



11,760 
12,434 

21,527 

18,950 

4,863 

1,804 

2,060 

376 

1,166 
918 
266 

7,935 
6,524 
1,719 

6,34S 
6,291 
1,486 

704 
461 
262 

3,570 

2,696 

754 



324,407 
392,232 

336,614 
404,916 
259,280 

37,400 

38,54-i 

9,696 

13,836 

15,172 

4,314 



285,378 
351,200 
245,270 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



41 



States. Alaska, and Hawaii: 1958, 1954, and 1939 

by State, see the General Sumnary Report of the 1954 Census of Mineral Industries, Vol. I.) 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 




Selected expenses ($1,000) 




Value of 
shipments 

and 
receipts'- 

($1,000) 


Capital 
expenditures^ 

($1,000) 


Energy used^ 
()™h equivalent) 




Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity* 


Minerals 

received 

for 

preparation 


Contract 
vrork* 


Purchased 
machinery 
installed^ 




Total 
(million) 


Per 

production 

worker 

(1,000) 




13,381,494 
'11,546,418 


2,879,669 
2,345,883 


1 756,454 
' *708,809 


1,854,770 
1,826,738 


1,015,257 
1,213,108 


18,089,834 
'14,906,583 


2,797,810 
2,723,756 


404,935 
372,524 


718 
576 


1 
2 


13,680,973 

'11,740,054 

2,765,396 


2,938,586 

2,390,951 

438,190 


1,758,380 

' *710,321 

(NA) 


1,855,630 

1,827,372 

210,368 


1,017,571 

1,214,881 

(NA) 


18,450,826 

'15,147,297 

3,413,954 


2,800,314 

2,725,665 

(NA) 


405,414 
373,126 
224,898 


693 
560 

291 


3 
4 
5 


32,301 
32,104 


11,496 
8,808 


122 
135 


1,392 
1,166 


2,693 
3,404 


44,034 
41,325 


3,970 
4,292 


711 
541 


259 
157 


6 
7 


53,958 
46,785 
14,415 


16,416 

11,861 

3,362 


550 
454 
(NA) 


1,603 

1,361 

37 


3,374 

3,715 

(NA) 


71,232 
59,559 
17,814 


4,669 

4,617 

(NA) 


874 
638 
404 


167 

122 

95 


8 
9 

10 


4,382 
4,304 
1,134 


91,419 
848 
143 


121 
(NA) 


82 

91 

2 


280 

327 

(NA) 


5,703 
5,242 
1,279 


460 
4^9 
(NA) 


90 
46 
16 


170 
70 
42 


11 
12 
13 


2,751 

1,913 

777 


1^825 
565 
126 


112 

51 

(NA) 


^^195 
66 


188 
(NA) 


3,858 

2,510 

903 


15224 
273 
(NA) 


29 

18 


121 

102 

68 


14 
15 
16 


15,766 

15,512 

(NA) 


4,367 
1,207 


44 
(NA) 


335 

589 

6 


861 
744 
(NA) 


21,172 

20,415 

6,243 


1,244 
841 
(NA) 


291 

209 

93 


135 

111 

59 


17 
18 
19 


18,656 

14,719 

4,610 


5,024 

3,684 

983 


261 
(NA) 


417 

292 

6 


988 

1,696 
(NA) 


23,831 

18,866 

5,599 


1,254 

1,726 

(NA) 


264 
185 
157 


195 
115 
130 


20 
21 
22 


1,863 

1,109 

623 


IH98 
372 
203 


(") 
(NA) 


^^56 

21 

2 


^=161 
166 
(NA) 


2,382 

1,4^7 

828 


1S222 
221 
(NA) 


1S25 
26 
25 


167 
186 
118 


23 
24 
25 


10,540 
9,228 
2,241 


3,737 

2,025 

700 


10 

37 

(NA) 


407 

302 

21 


766 
594 
(NA) 


14,286 

11,079 

2,962 


1,174 

1,107 

(NA) 


162 

143 

95 


222 

221 
150 


26 
27 
28 


733,341 
'767,134 


208,131 
189,381 


164,191 
^ ^177,420 


81,853 
102,288 


65,188 
68,629 


1,160,015 
l,229_,3n 


92,689 
75,539 


14,926 
19,300 


205 
184 


29 

30 


779,189 

rS800,722 

428,317 


216,227 

198,416 

83,386 


164,236 

' ^177,431 

(NA) 


81,874 

102,367 

17,539 


l"65,407 

68,717 

(NA) 


1,213,971 

r=l,271,938 

529,242 


^°92,962 

75,691 

(NA) 


14,958 
19,360 
30,072 


198 
178 
148 


31 
32 
33 


129,591 

104,719 

32,817 


31,925 

28,672 

6,982 


4,979 
340 
(NA) 


4,038 
5,028 
1,431 


6,058 

12,234 

(NA) 


163,658 

138,508 

41,230 


12,933 

12,485 

(NA) 


2,772 
3,268 
1,700 


386 
386 
241 


34 
35 
36 


40,663 

'38,941 

11,103 


11,974 

11,301 

2,926 


80 
'482 
(NA) 


830 

1,283 

95 


^°2,3U 

3,477 

(NA) 


51,961 

'51,455 

14,124 


i°3,897 

4,029 

(NA) 


655 
699 
652 


224 
197 
194 


37 
38 
39 


608,935 

1-657,038 

384,397 


172,328 

158,443 

73,478 


159,177 

^176,609 

(NA) 


77,006 
96,056 
16,013 


57,038 

53,006 

(NA) 


998,352 

^■l, 081, 975 
473; 888 


76,132 

59,177 

(NA) 


11,531 
15,393 
27,720 


176 
143 
134 


40 
41 
42 



42 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 

Table 5.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Divisions, 



Division, State, and year 



Establishments , 
number 



Total^ 



With 20 

or more 

employees 



All employees 



Number 



Payroll 



($1,000) 



Production and development 
workers 



Number 



Man-hours 



(1,000) 



Wages 



($1,000) 



DIVISIONS AND STATES— Continued 



East North Central: 

Mineral industries only: 

1958 

1954 



Including operations in manufactures : 

1958 

1954' 

1939^ 



Ohio: 
1958.. 
1954''. 
1939^ . 

Indiana: 
1958.. 



1954' 
19398 



Illinois: 

1958 

1954'?. . . 
1939^... 



Michigan: 
1958 



1954' 
19398 



Wisconsin: 

1958 

1954''... 
1939*... 



West North Central: 

Mineral industries only: 

1958 

1954 



Including operations in manufactures: 

1958 

1954'' 

1939* 



Minnesota: 

1958 

1954''... 
1939*... 



Iowa: 
1958... 
1954''. . 
1939* . . 

Missouri: 
1958... 
1954'' 
1939* 



a8 



North Dakota: 

1958 

1954'' 

1939* 



South Daiota: 

1958 

1954'' 

1939* 

Nebraska: 

1958 

1954'' 

1939* 



4,313 
4,636 

4,662 
4,912 
3,989 

1,599 
1,793 
1,407 

781 
815 
576 

1,375 
1,384 
1,233 

574 
591 
620 

333 
329 

153 



3,221 
3,320 

3,384 
3,435 
2,242 

317 
300 
178 

335 
364 
383 

469 
485 
491 

172 
147 
108 

142 

191 

59 

317 

259 

67 



659 
r691 

712 
1-745 
(NA) 

210 

220 

(NA) 

109 
113 
(NA) 

258 
r269 
(NA) 

91 

98 

(NA) 

44 

43 

(NA) 



452 
470 

484 
499 
(NA) 

96 

88 

(NA) 

44 

34 

(NA) 



83 
(NA) 

25 

26 

(NA) 

16 

25 

(NA) 

29 

22 

(NA) 



74,732 
81,411 



78,967 

86,251 

107,980 

22,268 
23,742 
27,343 

10,418 
11,039 
12,396 

27,482 
30,494 
48,887 

14,672 
16,693 
17,032 

4,127 
4,283 
2,322 



50, 928 
51,567 

53,600 
54,163 
44,826 

18,164 
17,756 

8,145 

3,146 
2,974 
5,928 

9,331 

8,854 

10,861 

1,967 

1,798 

960 



2,742 
3,001 
2,922 

2,181 

1,734 

531 



385,398 
349,426 

404,040 
367,576 
142,184 

114,990 
98,839 
33,852 

50,579 
45,112 
15,854 

144-,359 

128,189 

65,418 

74,712 
77,342 
23,943 

19,400 

18,094 

3,117 



253,055 
213,366 

264,617 

223,255 

59,270 

101,547 
78,444 
13,385 

13,620 

10,505 

6,059 

41,659 
34,490 
12,666 

10,737 
8,619 
1,042 

13,322 

12,254 

5,542 

9,571 

6,960 

451 



60,937 
69,142 

64,974 
73,815 
98,084 



17,359 
19,510 
24,948 

8,591 

9,576 

11,398 

23,218 
26,964 
44,422 



12,210 
13,991 
15,223 

3,596 
3,774 
2,093 



38,591 
43,170 

41,081 
45,589 
39,593 

12,600 

14,499 

6,866 

2,689 
2,677 
5,589 

7,145 
7,548 
9,320 

1,564 

1,399 

874 

2,378 
2,606 
2,647 

1,818 

1,531 

470 



114, 357 
131,846 

122,056 
141,163 
161,491 

32,686 
37,247 
41,312 

15,783 
17,863 
18,542 

43,891 
49,370 
68,509 



22,699 
28,762 
28,951 

6,997 
7,921 
4,177 



76,427 
86,965 



8l,5TQ 
92,437 
70,332 

24,207 
27,923 
13,215 



5,884 
6,049 
8,595 



13,826 
15,419 
16,529 

3,477 
2,956 
1,724 

4,951 
5,872 
5,988 

3,629 
3,450 
1,041 



292,921 
280,043 

310,336 
297,258 
119,026 

79,924 
74,881 
28,749 

38,547 
36,443 
13,671 

114,715 

108,516 

54,325 

60,782 
62,160 
19,677 

16,368 

15,258 

2,604 



174,836 
167,642 

184,952 

176,690 

46,611 



63,039 

58,942 

9,987 



10,863 
9,295 
5,489 



29,553 

27,621 

8,968 



8,056 

6,319 

871 

11,258 

10,321 

4,690 

7,624 

6,062 

365 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 

States, Alaska, and Hawaii: 1958, 1954, and 1 9 i9-Continucd 



43 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 


Selected expenses ($1,000) 


Value of 
shipments 

and 
receipts 1 

($1,000) 


Capital 
expenditures^ 

($1,000) 


Energy used^ 
(kwh equivalent) 




Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 

elec- 
tricity* 


Minerals 

received 

for 

preparation 


Contract 
vork* 


Purchased 
machinery 
installed 2 




Total 
(million) 


Per 

production 

worker 

($1,000) 




936,363 
813,435 


245,385 
198,264 


130,043 
* 60, 623 


66,048 
81,106 


73,860 
99,520 


1,324,808 
1,094,500 


126,891 
158,448 




18,184 
16,318 


298 
236 


1 
2 


994,314 

r855,6'H 

316,939 


256,869 

207,177 

56,604 


130,069 

^60,659 

(NA) 


66,26? 
81,202 
28,744 


1074,453 

100,208 

(NA) 


1,394,462 

1-1,143,779 

402,287 


l°127,510 

159,108 

(NA) 


18,317 
16,597 
18,071 


282 
225 

184 


3 
4 
5 


213,647 

ri81f,997 

51,914 


67,452 
48,003 
10,843 


29,599 

^10,735 

(M) 


12,844 

11,249 

1,473 


19,228 

19,844 

(NA) 


313,654 

r250,045 

64,230 


29,116 

24,783 

(NA) 


2,927 
2,790 
2,715 


169 
143 
109 


6 
7 
8 


117^928 
98,331 
28,094 


30,468 

25,502 

7,955 


2,372 

18,429 

(NA) 


6,220 
6,589 
1,338 


12,922 

13,270 

(NA) 


154,118 

145,816 

37,387 


15,792 

16,305 

(NA) 


1,724 
1,506 

1,888 


201 
157 
166 


9 
10 
11 


462,230 
378,595 
165,538 


100,060 
77,986 
23,710 


81,294 

*23,804 

(NA) 


28,071 
41,728 
22,406 


31,155 

38,327 

(NA) 


649,841 
496,815 
211,654 


52,969 

63,625 

(NA) 


8,648 
7,909 
8,705 


372 
293 
196 


12 

13 
14 


165,464 

153,036 

64,933 


45,504 
42,609 
12,162 


15,783 

*6,922 

(NA) 


17,070 

20,116 

3,509 


^°8,450 

23,520 

(NA) 


227,286 

199,440 

80,604 


1°24,985 

46,763 

(NA) 


4,304 
3,669 
4,525 


352 
262 
297 


15 
16 
17 


35,045 

36,682 

6,460 


15.385 

13,077 

1,934 


1,021 
769 
(NA) 


2,062 

1,520 

18 


2,698 

5,247 

(NA) 


49,563 

51,663 

8,412 


4,648 

7,632 

(NA) 


714 
723 
238 


199 
192 

114 


18 
19 
20 


918,673 
^785, 763 


225,172 

174,159 


93,109 
610, 280 


106,4U5 
130,828 


69,131 
104,617 


1,267,166 
=1,006,491 


145,078 
199,102 


23,645 
18,610 


613 
431 


21 
22 


956,496 

^813, 247 

213,735 


^1235,115 

182,462 

26,298 


1195,109 

^11,252 

(NA) 


106,U1^5 

131,039 

12,936 


1069,526 

104,929 

(NA) 


1,315,218 

=1,043,418 

252,969 


10145,273 

199,457 

(NA) 


23,715 

18,697 

7,324 


577 
410 
185 


23 
24 
25 


319,677 

293,990 

91,572 


78, 9^k 

58,948 

7,258 


29,71^3 

5,138 

(NA) 


10,993 

30,771 

106 


7,583 

25,800 

(NA) 


431,635 

350,424 

98,936 


15,305 

64,223 

(NA) 


7,878 
2,715 
1,715 


625 
187 
250 


26 
27 
28 


41,102 

27,316 

8,963 


12,936 

10,395 

1,827 


368 

14 

(NA) 


2,113 

1,526 

54 


1^4,1(67 

3,731 

(NA) 


54,633 
39,177 
10,844 


^^6,555 

3,805 

(NA) 


941 
682 
201 


350 

255 

36 


29 

30 
31 


78,292 

'68,571 

21,036 


^26,314 

18,676 

6,077 


3 (') 
=2,459 

(HA.) 


3,260 

2,869 

259 


8,881 

6,160 

(NA) 


103,286 

=92,869 

27,372 


13,461 

5,888 

(NA) 


1,312 

1,260 

786 


184 

167 

84 


32 
33 
34 


40,410 

^7,151 

2,027 


'20,247 

5 6 99^5^2 

471 


(') 

(') 

(NA) 


21,411 

20,305 

5 


9,579 

14,008 

(NA) 


65,732 

=28,694 

2,503 


25,915 

22,312 

(NA) 


805 
745 
180 


515 
533 
206 


35 
36 
37 


26,256 

'23,333 

20,689 


'10,505 
7,780 
2,172 


(') 
=592 
(NA) 


782 

2,273 

21 


1,583 

2,114 

(NA) 


36,544 

=32,454 

22,882 


2,582 

3,562 

(NA) 


489 
766 
557 


206 
294 
210 


38 
39 
40 


65,871 

30,082 

930 


'14,852 

6 '7,651 

348 


(') 

(') 

(NA) 


11,521 

8,659 

73 


1^5,322 

8,395 

(NA) 


83,253 

38,400 

1,351 


1=14,313 

16,387 

(NA) 


1,457 

692 

56 


801 
452 
119 


41 
42 
43 



44 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 

Table 5— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Divisions, 



Division, State, and year 



Establishments , 
number 



Total^ 



With 20 

or more 

employees 



All employees 



Number 



Payroll 



($1,000) 



Production and development 
workers 



Man-hours 



($1,000) 



Wages 



($1,000) 



DIVISIONS AND STATES— Continued 



West North Central — Continued 
Kansas: 

1958 

19547 

1939* 



South Atlantic: 
Mineral Industries only: 

1958 

195-i 



Including operations in manufactures: 
1958 



1954' 

1939 ' 

Delavfare, Maryland, and District of Columbia: 

1958 

1954^ 

1939* , 

Virginia: 

1958 

1954'' 



1939 



West Virginia: 

1958 

1954'' 

1939* 



North Carolina: 

1958 

1954'' 

1939* 



South Carolina: 

1958 

1954'' 



1939 



Georgia: 
1958. . . 
1954'', . 
1939* . . 

Florida: 
1958... 
1954''.. 
1939*.. 



East South Central: 

Mineral industries only: 

1958 

1954 



Including operations in manufactures: 
1958 



1954' 

1939* 

Kentuclsy: 
1958.... 
1954''. . . 
1939*... 

Tennessee: 

1958 

1954''... 



1939 



Alabama: 
1958... 
1954'' 
1939* 



q8 



1,632 

1,689 

956 



4,701 
4,227 



4,875 
4,380 
2,141 



208 
216 
180 

1,066 
788 
257 

2,826 
2,339 
1,351 



267 
546 

111 



72 
46 

202 
220 

110 

220 
199 



3,215 
3,073 

3,311 
3,159 
1,423 

2,123 

1,828 

743 

562 
692 
266 

357 
413 
341 



194 
221 
(NA) 



899 
808 

930 
843 
(NA) 

31 
32 

(NA) 

204 
164 
(NA) 

474 
467 
(NA) 

57 

46 

(NA) 

22 

19 

(NA) 

70 

58 

(NA) 

72 

57 

(NA) 



575 
581 

595 

599 

(NA) 

334 

337 

(NA) 

106 
112 
(NA) 

91 

98 

(NA) 



16,069 
18,046 
15,479 



106,066 
108,999 



108,816 
111,848 
141,898 



2,542 
2,171 
3,850 



18,600 
16,864 
20,061 

68,715 

75,073 

107,260 

4,265 
4,047 
1,965 

1,591 
1,518 
1,388 

6,182 
5,286 
3,906 

6,921 
6,889 
3,468 



62,083 
66,628 



63,755 
68,079 
93,949 



36,134 
38,917 
53,839 

9,692 
10,181 
12,462 

12,583 
15,136 
26,953 



74,161 
71,983 
20,125 



478,296 
421,261 

487,949 
429,574 
173,211 

10,632 
7,599 
3,937 

70,371 
55,064 
20,942 

334,601 
308,745 
139,827 

13,929 
11,642 

1,443 

5,546 
4,356 
1,064 

22,737 

15,742 

2,808 

30,133 

26,426 

3,190 



263,721 
240,006 

269,247 

244,415 

96,023 



149,586 

139,370 

56,971 



35,585 
32,037 
11,945 

57,389 
57,317 
26,449 



12,887 
15,329 
13,827 



92,417 
98,602 

95,002 
101,328 
134,746 

2,195 
1,944 
3,599 

16,240 
15,123 
19,010 

60, 272 

68,698 

102,302 

3,844 
3,784 
1,787 

1,350 
1,372 
1,291 

5,393 
4,782 
3,674 

5,708 
5,625 
3,083 



54,294 
60,615 



55,890 
61,988 
89,522 

32,135 
35,842 
51,452 

8,411 

9,416 

11,723 

11,174 
13,602 
25,758 



25,596 
30,768 
23,240 



161,799 
176,135 

166,763 
181,592 

211,365 

4,191 
4,374 
6,090 

27,460 
26,508 
28,998 

101,060 
115,644 
156,344 

7,764 
8,337 
3,720 

2,768 
3,102 
2,756 

11,378 

10,490 

7,440 

12,142 

13,137 

6,017 



93,251 
104,304 

96,375 
107,058 
134,469 

53,187 
59,702 
73,891 



15,571 
17,412 
19,578 



18,745 
23,526 
39,827 



54,559 
58,130 
16,241 



399,482 
366,985 

408,309 
374,640 
157,882 

8,386 
6,604 
3,417 

59,154 
47,156 
18,888 

283,397 
274,014 
128,978 

11,711 

10,303 

1,123 

4,303 

3,591 

782 

18,273 

13,016 

2,279 

23,085 

19,956 

2,415 



220,315 
206,919 

225,400 

210,951 

86,990 



129,153 

124, 206 

52,338 



29,411 
28,044 
10,459 

47,742 
46,947 
23,764 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 

States, Alaska, and Hawaii. 1958, 1954, and 1939-Continucd 



45 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 


Selected expenses ($1,000) 


Value of 

shipments 

and 
receipts 1 

($1,000) 


Capital 
expenditures^ 

($1,000) 


Energy uoed^ 
()cwh equivalent) 




Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
stile, and 
purchased 
fuels and 

elec- 
tricity* 


Minerals 

received 

for 

preparation 


Contract 
work* 


Purchased 
machinery 
ins tailed 2 




Total 
(million) 


Per 

production 

worker 

($1,000) 




384,888 

362,804 

68,518 


78,525 

69,605 

8,145 


56,074 

*2,914 

(KA) 


56,081 
64,636 
12,418 


31,911 

44,721 

(NA) 


540,135 

461,400 

89,081 


67,344 

83,280 

(NA) 


10,833 

11,839 

3,829 


841 
772 
277 


1 
2 
3 


939,989 
5761,393 


^2281,858 
238,995 


1^194,560 
5 ^102,110 


43,227 
39,317 


93,637 
75,363 


1,411,426 
51,118,407 


141,845 
98,768 


14,697 
12,887 


159 
131 


4 
5 


969,764 
5782,793 
243,276 


^^287,827 

243,903 

49,004 


^=194,842 

5 6102,145 

(NA) 


43,251 

39,332 

2,741 


1093,996 

75,549 
(NA) 


1,447,446 

51,144,729 

295,021 


10142,234 

98,990 

(NA) 


14,740 

12,928 

8,876 


155 

128 

66 


6 
7 
8 


27,510 

20,572 

7,243 


9,827 
5,554 
1,405 


2,504 
(NA) 


1,953 

736 

59 


3,328 

2,195 

(NA) 


41,261 

27,145 

8,707 


3,861 

1,912 

(NA) 


347 
410 
388 


158 
211 
108 


9 

10. 
11 


142,571 
96,014 
28,642 


42,170 

37,963 

5,939 


29,209 

10,003 

(NA) 


12,076 

4,502 

44. 


17,777 

7,449 

(NA) 


207,408 

145,592 

34,625 


36,395 

10,339 

(NA) 


1,638 

1,399 

701 


101 
93 
37 


12 
13 
14 


607,943 
515,807 
187,547 


^163,456 

150,663 

34,319 


122,885 

^58,982 

(NA) 


22,946 

26,772 

2,400 


51,493 

46,161 

(NA) 


892,384 
739,381 
224,266 


76,339 

59,004 

(NA) 


6,922 
5,885 
5,662 


115 
86 
55 


15 
16 
17 


31,757 

533,143 

3,448 


12,554 
8,962 
1,082 


543 
5218 
(NA) 


611 

890 

7 


3,067 

3,066 

(NA) 


44,557 
542,811 

4,537 


3,975 

3,466 

(MA) 


737 

513 
176 


192 

136 

98 


18 
19 
20 


14,499 

11,229 

2,389 


'6,052 
3,431 
1,010 


(') 

4 
(NA) 


160 

168 

58 


1,480 

1,298 

(NA) 


20,341 

14,184 

3,457 


1,850 

1,946 

(NA) 


282 
288 
133 


209 
210 

103 


21 
22 
23 


58,048 

37,326 

5,864 


1^23,322 

12,160 

2,204 


^^879 
647 
(NA) 


1,151 

1,311 

130 


7,278 

4,309 

(NA) 


82,545 

49,066 

8,198 


8,133 

6,687 

(NA) 


1,905 

1,339 

770 


353 
280 
210 


24 
25 
26 


87,436 

568,702 

8,143 


1^30,556 

25,170 

3,045 


I'- 38, 712 

532,291 

(NA) 


4,354 

4,953 

43 


l°9,573 

11,071 

(NA) 


158,950 

5126,550 

11,231 


i°ll,681 

15,636 

(MA) 


2,909 
3,094 
1,046 


510 
550 
339 


27 
28 
29 


651,249 
5519,642 


181,075 
130,228 


130,558 
5 639,311 


64,692 
41,495 


55,421 
44,401 


983,325 
5706,066 


99,670 
69,011 


12,104 
9,853 


223 
163 


30 
31 


671,834 

5531,679 

130,531 


184,937 

133,168 

25,930 


130,748 

5 639,502 

(MA) 


64,695 

41,500 

2,020 


55,564 

44,491 

(NA) 


1,007,944 

5721,230 

158,481 


99,834 

69,112 

(NA) 


12,128 
9,867 
5,742 


217 

159 

64 


32 
33 
34 


321,348 

270,714 

77,169 


88,650 
67,651 
13,553 


75,908 

624,775 

(NA) 


24,617 

14,905 

1,084 


28,063 

18,756 

(NA) 


493,635 

366,082 

91,806 


44,951 

30,719 

(NA) 


4,143 
3,514 
2,322 


129 
98 
45 


35 
36 
37 


76,001 
65,241 
18,435 


'39,212 

19,594 

4,160 


1,236 
(NA) 


3,234 

3,741 

89 


5,985 

5,543 

(NA) 


115,754 
88,267 
22,684 


8,678 

7,088 

(NA) 


1,955 
1,122 
1,421 


232 
119 
121 


38 
39 
40 


138,254 

5100,869 

33,849 


'66,007 
27,562 

7,702 


513,023 
(NA) 


8,452 

3,768 

301 


10,381 

8,920 

(NA) 


209,396 

5145,888 

41,852 


13,698 

8,256 

(NA) 


1,499 
1,261 
1,815 


134 
93 
70 


41 
42 
43 



46 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 

Table 5— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Divisions, 



Division, State, and year 



Establishments 
number 



Total^ 



With 20 

or more 

employees 



All employees 



Payroll 



($1,000) 



Production and development 
workers 



Number 



Man-hours 



($1,000) 



Wages 



($1,000) 



DIVISIONS AND STAiES— Continued 



East South Central — Continued 
Mississippi: 

1958 

19547 

1939^ 



West South Central: 

Mineral industries only: 

1958 

1954 



Including operations in manufactures: 

1958 

1954' 

1939^ 



Arkansas: 
1958... 
1954''.. 
1939^ . . 



Louisiana: 

1958 

1954'. . . 
1939^ . . . 

Oklahoma: 

1958 

1954 ■'. . . 
1939*... 

Texas: 

1958 

19547... 
19398 . . . 



Mountain: 

Mineral industries only: 

1958 

1954 



Including operations in manufactures: 

1958 

1954' 

1939* 



Montana: 
1958... 
19547., 
1939* . . 

Idaho: 
1958... 



1954' 
1939* 



Wyoming: 

1958 

19547 

1939* 

Colorado: 

1958 

19547 

1939* 

New Mexico: 

1958 

19547 

1939* 

Arizona: 
1958 



1954' 
1939* 



269 

226 

73 



10,062 
9,179 

10,216 
9,306 
6,252 

463 
423 
307 

1,132 
911 
573 

2,668 
2,627 
1,687 

5,955 
5,345 
3,685 



3,803 
4,551 

3,916 
4,612 
2,351 

453 
583 
499 

183 
257 
116 

504 
487 
188 

992 

1,043 

589 

770 
693 
286 

338 
533 
179 



64 

52 

(NA) 



1,896 
1,906 

1,918 

1,938 

(NA) 

66 

72 

(NA) 

344 

286 

(NA) 

34.7 
399 
(NA) 

1,161 

1,181 

(NA) 



566 
556 

574 

561 

(NA) 

39 

56 

(NA) 

22 

28 

(NA) 

87 
101 
(NA) 

132 
118 
(NA) 

142 
119 
(NA) 

43 

37 

(NA) 



5,346 

3,845 

695 



225,804 
223,679 

227,261 
225,433 
122,938 

5,635 
6,131 
7,477 

46,161 
37, 209 
14,475 

38,458 
41,100 
33,312 

137,007 

140,993 

67,674 



84,958 
84,662 

85,806 
85,066 
74,096 

8,490 
11,605 
11,599 

3,979 
4,781 
5,049 

8,644- 
9,745 
6,848 

14,273 
13,690 
14,800 

17,552 

13,934 

8,921 

15,609 
13,290 
10,389 



26,687 

15,691 

658 



1,231,180 
1,044,616 

1,236,506 

1,049,222 

203,232 

24, 587 

22,977 

8,734 

265,027 

179,489 

24,375 

196,064 

177,623 

52,548 

750, 828 
669,133 
117, 575 



463,478 
393,746 

467,344 
395,178 
111,751 

44,295 
51,764 
17,722 

21,085 

22,405 

8,146 

49,097 
45,847 
10,442 

76,923 
59,999 

19,823 

97,493 
65,784 
12,720 

81,473 
66,776 
17,066 



4,170 

3,128 

589 



151,708 
165,208 

153,129 

166,957 

98,687 

4,399 
5,206 
6,926 

33,293 
29,575 
12,244 

24,876 
30,534 
26,188 

90,561 

101,642 

53,329 



64,732 
68,713 

65,575 
69,114 
66,711 

5,866 

8,936 

10,291 



3,352 
4,135 
4,654 

6,036 
7,491 
6,204 

10,014 
10,977 
13,469 

13,609 

11,545 

8,065 

12,462 

11,073 

9,400 



8,872 
6,418 
1,173 



320,248 
358,039 

323,006 
361,436 
176,345 

8,525 
10,425 
10,737 

75,470 
65,982 
22,496 

48,044 
61,532 
46,857 

190,957 

223,497 

96,255 



128,802 
140,458 

130,461 
141,253 
129,846 

11,073 
17,478 
19,862 

6,436 
8,651 
9,753 

12,056 
14,641 
10,189 

19,340 
21,317 
23,356 

28,197 
23,599 
14,817 

25,189 
25,286 
22,059 



19,094 

11,754 

429 



719,783 
688,469 

724,927 
693,048 
137,938 

17^503 

17,995 

7,446 

174,668 

132,855 

18,351 

105,403 

115,830 

33,892 

427,353 

426,368 

78,249 



329,888 
301,851 

333,739 

303,275 

93,717 

28,038 
36,979 
14,701 

16,565 

18,711 

7,086 

31,092 

32,508 

8,765 

48,166 
44,381 
16,845 



70,355 
51,274 
10,605 

63,257 
54,081 
14,561 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 
States, Alaska, and Hawaii. 1958, 1954, and 1939-Concmucd 



47 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 


Selected exiJenaes ($1,000) 


Value of 
shipmenta 

and 
receipts 1 

($1,000) 


Capital 
expenditures^ 

($1,000) 


Energy used^ 
(kwh equivalent) 




Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
eleo- 
tricit/ 


Minerals 

received 

for 

prepara-tlon 


Contract 
work 


Purchased 
machinery 
installed^ 




Total 
(million) 


Per 

production 

worker 

(1,000) 




136,231 

94,855 

1,078 


30,502 
6 '18,829 

515 


15,406 

(') 

(NA) 


28,392 

19,086 

546 


11,135 

11,272 

(NA) 


189,159 

120,993 

2,139 


32,507 

23,049 

(HA) 


4,531 

3,970 

184 


1,087 
1,269 

312 


1 
2 
3 


6,158,639 
'5,209,789 


1,127,598 
'918,790 


634,542 
' * 149, 323 


1,067,056 
1,029,501 


464,945 
615,825 


7,917,123 
^6,397,677 


1,535,457 
1,525,548 


237,107 
217,257 


1,563 
1,315 


4 
5 


6,186,121 

i-s5,226,592 

809,276 


1,132,277 

922,642 

83,045 


634,662 

^ ® 149, 323 

(M) 


1,067,092 

1,029,511 

122,948 


464,959 

615,875 

(NA) 


7,949,606 

rS6,lH8,352 
1,015,269 


1,535,505 

1,525,579 

(NA) 


237,112 
217,268 
106,337 


1,5^8 
1,301 
1,078 


6 
7 
8 


114,459 

'110,107 

22,150 


^^20,530 

' *20,386 

4,040 


"3,456 

^ ^2,085 

(HA) 


11,094 

12,855 

5,158 


7,816 

7,139 

(NA) 


141,084 

'138,879 

31,348 


16,271 

13,690 

(NA) 


3,752 
3,793 
3,306 


853 
729 
477 


9 

10 
11 


1,528,053 

984,976 

92,879 


338,885 

« '231,042 

14,288 


112,644 

(') 

(HA) 


349,184 

260,574 

26,661 


144,851 

- ^150,157 

(NA) 


1,903,526 

1,195,573 

133,828 


570,091 

431,176 

(NA) 


47,946 
43,447 
16,448 


1,440 
1,469 
1,343 


12 
13 
14 


676,924 
'586,626 
173,015 


^^135, 613 

123,700 

21,909 


^^50,538 

' ^17,576 

(NA) 


126,847 

155,980 

13,789 


60,422 

94,720 

(NA) 


864,106 
758,124 
208,713 


186,238 

220,478 

(NA) 


31,638 
31,302 
23,132 


1,272 

1,025 

883 


15 
16 
17 


3,866,685 

^3,5W^,87'+ 

521,232 


^^639,^3 

^ '677,176 

42,808 


^^1*65, 790 

(') 

(HA) 


579,967 

600,102 

77,340 


251,870 

363,859 

(HA) 


5,040,890 

i''t,325,776 

641,380 


762,905 

860,235 

(NA) 


153,779 

138,726 

63,451 


1,698 
1,365 
1,190 


18 
19 
20 


1,745,655 
'1,305,418 


1*436,182 
312,916 


1*288,677 
' ^140,363 


315,021 
256,342 


142,625 
128,584 


2,447,655 
'1,768,451 


480,505 
364,677 


46,449 
38,360 


7X8 
558 


21 
22 


1,770,199 

'1,313,850 

283,834 


1*439,627 

314,283 

64,167 


^*288,677 

' *140,363 

(HA) 


315,027 
256,353 

13,242 


142,670 

128,606 

(HA) 


2,475,644 

'1,778,236 

361,243 


480,556 

364,679 

(NA) 


46,451 
38,361 
18,846 


708 
555 
282 


23 
24 
25 


116,995 

'83,942 

34,865 


29,822 

26,150 

9,253 


33,014 

' ^35,711 

(NA) 


17,631 

24,074 

583 


7,466 

10,554 

(HA) 


181,501 

'148,747 

44,701 


23,1+25 

31,680 

(NA) 


2,879 
2,504 
1,237 


491 
280 
120 


26 
27 
28 


38,427 

'38,692 

18,952 


11,538 

11,498 

4,335 


2,147 

'2,672 

(NA) 


3,446 

1,787 

102 


1,195 

3,256 

(NA) 


53,842 

'52,083 

23,389 


2,911 

5,822 

(NA) 


580 
527 
233 


173 

127 

50 


29 
30 

31 


344,770 

'258,503 

32,679 


44,069 

43,751 

3,016 


16,718 
5 61^399 

(NA) 


49,741 
56,146 

3,176 


18,729 
25,319 

(NA) 


407,929 

^13,659 

38,871 


66,098 

71,475 

(NA) 


7,175 
9,546 
1,856 


1,189 

1,274 

299 


32 
33 
34 


255,896 

'207,541 

41,875 


67,986 

50,243 

9,815 


37,038 

' ^3,355 

(NA) 


36,338 

40,761 

601 


31,390 

24,787 

(NA) 


369,520 

'262,214 

52,291 


59,128 

56,479 

(NA) 


6,232 
4.873 
2,113 


622 

444 
157 


35 
36 

37 


534,146 

'338,096 

44,683 


120,090 

67,887 

6,955 


89,911 
(NA) 


139,258 

72,572 

7,522 


47,837 

41,036 

(NA) 


707,071 

'403,274 

59,160 


224,171 

121,656 

(NA) 


19,^+31 

12,384 

9,234 


1,428 
1,073 
1,145 


38 
39 
40 


195,533 

179,001 

40,560 


59,168 
48,748 
13,540 


7,973 

'1,078 

(NA) 


18,412 
30,428 

130 


^^6,012 

9,154 

(NA) 


257,177 

'219,031 

54,230 


^^29,921 

47,867 

(HA) 


^'4,579 
3,747 
2,372 


367 
338 
252 


41 
42 
43 



48 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 

Table 5— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Divisions, 



Division, State, and year 



Establishments , 
number 



Total^ 



With 20 

or more 

employees 



All employees 



Number 



Payroll 



($1,000) 



Production and development 
workers 



Number 



Man-hours 



($1,000) 



Wages 



($1,000) 



DIVISION AND STATES— Continued 

Mountain— Continued 
Utah: 

1958 

1954'' 

19398 

Nevada: 

1958 

igs^' 

19398 

Pacific: 

Mineral industries only: 

1958 

1954 

Including operations in manufactures: 

1958 

1954T 

1939? 

Washington: 

1958 

19547 

19398 

Oregon: 

1958 

1954'' 

19398 

California: 

1958 

1954T 

1939? 

Alaska: 

1958 

19547 

Hawaii : 

1958 

1954'' 



468 
562 
199 

208 
454 
295 



2,059 
2,755 

2,227 
2,861 
2,354 

239 
311 
177 

230 
296 
128 

1,758 
2,254 
2,049 

160 
194 

24 
13 



79 

59 

(NA) 

30 

43 

(NA) 



307 
360 

325 
372 
(NA) 

30 

35 

(NA) 

15 

13 

(NA) 

280 
324 
(NA) 

9 
14 



14,100 
12,685 
10,832 

3,159 
5,336 
5,658 



37,047 
43,898 

38,424 
44,819 
46,399 



2,236 
3,228 
4,248 

1,367 
1,487 
1,476 

34,821 
40,104 
40,675 



1,436 



445 
171 



80,290 
56,807 
16,614 

16,688 

25,796 

9,218 



228,925 
223,675 

235,893 

227,431 

85,105 

11,977 

14,781 

6,203 

6,921 
6,546 
1,955 

216,995 

206,104 

76,947 

7,642 
9,529 

1,820 
598 



11,684 

10,298 

9,529 

2,552 
4,659 
5,099 



26,062 
33,218 

27,429 
34,137 
38,764 

1,795 
2,647 
3,894 

1,138 
1,331 
1,309 

24,496 
30,159 
33,561 

816 
1,197 

391 
156 



23,013 
19,903 
18,466 

5,157 
10,378 
11,344. 



52,871 
66,398 

55,579 
68,232 
77,826 

3,187 
4,912 
6,608 



2,270 
2,690 
2,672 

50,122 
60,630 
68,546 



2,047 
2,990 

793 
320 



63,238 
43,447 
13,274 

13,028 

21,894 

7,880 



142,881 
155,722 

149,784 

159,471 

64,350 

8,944 

11,403 

5,376 

5,622 
5,718 
1,627 

135,218 

142,350 

57,347 

5,725 
7,663 

1,522 
517 



NA Not available. 

■■■For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment. For 1958 and 1954, represents gross value of shipments and contains some duplication due to the 
transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for preparation. The approximate magnitude of this duplication is indicated by the 
figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For 1939, represents net production and excludes this duplication. For 1954 and 1939, 
excludes the value of residue gas from natural gas liquids plants 

^Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 
^For 1939, represents the number of mines and quarries, number of natural gas liquids plants, number of crude petroleum and lu-tuxal gas establish- 
ments, ana lor mining servi^^s inaustries, number of operating companies. 

■^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is 
included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 
^Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 

^Excludes the cost of natural gas processed at natural gas liquids plants, but includes the estimated value prior to processing of liquids con- 
tained in such gas . 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Except for value of shipments and value added excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction with quarries . For the 
United States, the value added in dressing stone at such operations was $7,915 thousand; this value has been included in the value of shipments and 
value added in mining. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 
States, Alaska, and Hawaii: 1958, 1934, and 1939-Continucd 



49 



Value 
added 

in 
mining 



($1,000) 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity* 



Minerals 

received 

for 

preparation 



Conti'Qc t 
vork* 



Purchased 
machinery 
installed^ 



Value of 
shipments 

and 
receipts^ 



($1,000) 



Capital 
expenditures^ 



($1,000) 



Energy used^ 
(kwh equivalent) 



Total 



(million) 



For 

produc tion 

worker 



(1,000) 



250,132 

'153,235 

51,550 

34,302 

354,795 

18,670 



1,265,284 

'1,350,173 



1,299,098 

'1,367,855 

333,283 



28,386 

'25,182 

11,075 

18,633 

13,168 
3,807 



1,252,079 

'1,329,505 

318,401 



9,214 
14,383 

4,887 
1,266 



75,790 
39,679 
11,225 

'31,172 

26,327 

6,028 



^*175,448 
175,791 

^*182,601 

179,826 

46,357 



9 



10,095 
8,307 
2,554 



6,173 
4,681 
1,298 



166,833 

166,838 

42,505 



4,453 
4,890 

1,228 
349 



101,876 

'75,609 

(NA) 

C) 

'14,766 

(NA) 



^*108,176 
' ^29,250 



^*108,177 

' '29,251 

(NA) 

(') 
'214 
(NA) 

166 

66 

(NA) 



107,511 

' '28,971 

(NA) 



500 

121 



47,246 

16,565 

262 

2,949 

14,020 

866 



109,322 
14^,695 



109,376 

144,706 

20,782 

1,974 

1,740 

65 

3,083 

1,899 

15 

104,319 

141,067 

20,702 

7,120 
1,651 



128 
130 



'22,368 

10,090 

(NA) 




432,288 

'275,157 

63,037 


7,64^ 

4,410 

(NA) 




66,318 

'104,071 

25,564 


47,757 
72,765 


1 
'1 


,534,282 
,544,353 


47,807 

72,790 

(NA) 


1 
'1 


,575,303 
,566,056 
400,422 


1,583 

2,387 

(NA) 




39,220 

'34,998 

13,694 


1,632 

2,761 

(NA) 




23,085 

18,872 

5,120 


4^,592 

67,642 

(NA) 


1 
'1 


,512,998 
,512,186 
381,608 


1,674 
3,305 




17,346 
19,753 


668 
226 




6,207 
1,778 



^^65,124 

19,438 

(NA) 

9,749 

10,262 

(NA) 



171,705 
228,371 



171,756 

228,422 

(NA) 



2,818 

2,857 

(NA) 

6,602 

3,703 

(NA) 

162,336 

221,862 

(NA) 

5,615 
4,597 

704 
193 



4,722 
3,851 
1,346 



853 
929 

455 



37,106 
39,178 



37,113 
39,180 
29,396 

481 
404 
251 

345 
349 
143 

36,287 
38,427 
29,002 

652 

677 

64 
19 





4CK 
374 
141 


1 
2 
3 




334 

199 

89 


4 
5 
6 


1 
1 


,424 
,179 


7 
8 


1 

1 


,353 
,148 
758 


9 

10 
11 




268 

153 

64 


12 
13 
14 




303 
262 
109 


15 
16 
17 


1 

1 


,481 

,274 

864 


18 
19 
20 




799 
566 


21 
22 




164 
122 


23 
24 



'The cost of minerals received for preparation is Included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

^°For Middle Atlantic, excludes data for dimension stone operations in manufactures in New Jersey; for the East North Central, excludes data for 
dimension stone operations in manufactures in Michigan. For the West North Central, excludes data for deminsion stone mining operations in manufac- 
tures in Iowa and Nebraska. For the South Atlantic, excludes data for dimension stone operations in manufactures in Florida. 

^^For dimension stone operations in manufactures in New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Missouri, Georgia, and Florida, the cost of minerals received for 
preparation and contract work is included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

^^The cost of minerals received for preparation in South Carolina and Texas are included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and 
purchased fuels and electricity. 

^^The cost of minerals received for preparation in the Metal Mining Industries is included with the coat of supplies, purchases for resale, and 
purchased fuels and electricity. 

^*The cost of minerals received for preparation in Nevada are included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and 
electricity. 

^'Excludes data for dimension stone operations in manufactures. 

^'The cost of minerals received for preparation in the Metal Mining and Nonmetallic Mineral Mining Industries in Washington is included with the 
cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 



50 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 



Table 6.— Value of Primary and Secondary Shipments and Receipts and Value of Net Shipments in 

All Industries, by Industry for the United States: 1958 



Ind. 
code 



Industry or subindustry 



Value of shipments and receipts of establishments 
classified in the industry ($1,000) 



Total 



Primary 
products 



Secondary 
products 



Receipts 

for 

secondary 

services 



Products 
purchased 

and resold 
without 
further 

processing 



Value of net shipments of primary 
products or services of the in- 
dustry shipped or performed by 
establishments in all industries 
($1,000) 



Total 
(produced 

or 
performed 
in all in- 
dustries) 



Produced 

or 

performed 

in this 

industry 



Produced 

or 

performed 

in other 
industries 



10 
1011 
1021 
1031 



104 
1042 
1043 
lOM- 

1051 

106 
1062 
1064 
1069 

108 

1081 

1082 

109 

1092 

1093 

1094 

1099 

11 
1111 
1112 
1113 

12 

1211 

1212 

1213 

1214 

13 
1311 



1321 

138 
1381 
1382 
1389 



14 
1411 



1421 



1441 



145 

1452 

1453 

1454 

1455 

1456 

1457 

1459 



Metal mining: 

Iron ores 

Copper ores 

Lead and zinc ores 

Lead ores 

Zinc ores 

Gold and silver ores: 

Lode gold 

Placer gold 

Silver ores 

Bauxite 

Ferroalloy ores: 

Manganese ores 

Tungsten ores 

Ferroalloy ores , nee 

Metal mining services: 

Metal mining stripping services 

Metal mining services , nee 

Miscellaneous metal ores: 

Mercury ores 

Titanium ores 

Uranium-radium-vanadium ores 

Metallic ores, nee 

Anthracite mining: 

Anthracite 

Anthracite stripping services 

Anthracite mining services, nee 

Bituminous coal and lignite mining: 

Bituminous coal 

Lignite 

Coal stripping services, nee 

Coal mining services, nee 

Oil and gas extraction: 

Crude petroleum and natural gas , 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 

Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services: 

Drilling oil and gas wells 

Oil and gas exploration services 

Oil and gas field services, nee 

Survey, log, cement services 

Miscellaneous oil and gas field services. 

Nonmetallie minerals mining: 

Dimension stone 

Dimension limestone , 

Dimension granite 

Dimension stone , nee 

Crushed and broken stone 

Crushed and broken limestone 

Crushed and broken granite 

Crushed and broken stone, nee 

Sand and gravel 

Common sand and gravel 

Glass sand 

Molding sand 

Clay and related minerals; 

Bentonite , 

Fire clay , 

Fuller ' s earth , 

Kaolin and ball clay , 

Feldspar , 

Magnesite and brucite , 

Clay and related minerals, nee , 



681,938 

457,644 

120,561 

75,603 

44,958 



29,506 
6,326 

12,557 

18,174 



39,385 
14,430 
57,706 



10,270 
22,114 



8,607 

17,158 

336,451 

3,018 



290,342 

34,463 

323 



2,390,677 

11,035 

19,162 

2,487 



8,385,906 

7,809,898 

576,008 

1,625,098 



904,939 
87,215 
633,729 
220,829 
412,900 



15,864 
4,174 
5,577 
6,113 

616,076 

459,037 

49,596 

107,443 

560,806 

516,090 

28,343 

16,373 



16,843 

18,606 
8,692 

42,434 
6,889 
7,270 

22,004 



(D) 

440,410 

116,420 

61,553 

37,790 



29,436 

6,314 

12,313 

18,155 



(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



(D) 

(D) 

(D) 

2,940 



282,593 
(D) 
(D) 



2,363,691 

11,021 

19,112 

2,262 



8,325,029 

6,899,121 

432,565 

1,617,511 



842,509 
83,991 
560,656 
150,361 
357,713 



15,275 
4,128 
5,166 
5,979 

583,039 

432,066 

48,467 

99,376 

519,327 

474,510 

19,442 

14,319 



16,603 

17,735 

(D) 

(D) 

6,228 

7,270 

21,741 



(D) 
17,05'^ 

4,031 
13,940 

7,168 



70 

12 

244 



(D) 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 

78 



(D) 



121 

854,006 

139,458 

1,708 



49,515 
24 

1,897 
24 

1,873 



438 
41 

350 
49 

18,466 

14,427 

767 

6,402 

29,154 

29,944 

8,568 

1,698 



(D) 
632 
(D) 
463 
661 



657 
130 
110 

110 



19 



(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 

1,475 



(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



1,068 

14 

18 

207 



59,436 

55,480 

3,956 

5,879 



10,697 
2,093 
13,149 
24,130 
41,601 



5 

1 

2,988 

2,426 

157 

405 

4,595 
4,595 



(D) 
230 



(D) 
50 



(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



4,960 



22,799 

32 
18 



1,320 

1,291 

29 



2,218 

1,107 

58,027 

46,314 

11,713 



145 

"eo 

85 

11,583 

10,118 

205 

1,260 

7,730 

7,o;i 

333 
356 



9 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 



624,841 

369,419 

102,676 

59,941 

42,735 



29,072 

6,314 

13,093 

17,355 



32,776 
13,675 
67,868 



10,886 
21,377 

^8,402 

^12,365 

224,931 

3,551 



196,425 

333 305 

^926 



2,055,042 

11,021 

19,123 

2,414 



8,376,465 

7,082,194 

1,294,271 

699,328 



895,267 
84,647 
578,104 
181,215 
396,889 



22,154 
7,139 
5,864 
9,151 

*731,642 

'^577,004 

^^49,961 

^^104, 677 

*591,188 

*550,289 

^21,955 

5 19, 021 



23,207 

■^33,497 

6,778 

47,664 

7,018 

7,270 

*68,202 



(D) 

357,244 

99,702 

54,094 

28,531 



28,164 

6,314 

12,177 

17,355 



(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



^8,402 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



196,425 
(D) 
(D) 



2,054,607 

11,021 

19,112 

2,262 



3,325,029 

5,899,121 

432,565 

699,328 



842,509 
83,991 
560,656 
150,361 
357,713 



15,275 
4,128 
5,166 
5,979 

580,851 

430,007 

48,467 

99,247 

518,457 
473,717 
^19,442 
514,319 



616,505 

17,559 

6,778 

(D) 

5,772 

7,270 

21,741 



(D) 

12,175 

2,974 

5,847 

14,204 



908 



916 



(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



435 



11 
152 



51,436 
183,073 
861,706 



52,758 
656 
17,448 
30,854 
39,176 



6,879 

3,011 

698 

3,172 

*150,791 

*146,997 

-^1,494 

*5,430 

"^72,731 

■^76,572 

2,513 

4,702 



"^6,702 
^15,938 

Id) 

1,246 
*46,46i 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



51 



Table 6— Value of Primary and Secondary Shipments and Receipts and Value of Net Shipments in 
All Industries, by Industry for the United States; 1958— Continued 



Ind. 
code 



Industry or sub Indus try 



Value of shipments and receipts of establishments 
classified in tlie industry ($1,000) 



Total 



Primary 
produc ts 



Secondary 
products 



Receipts 

for 

secondary 

services 



Products 
purchased 

and resold 
without 
fui'ther 

processing 



Value of net shipments of primary 
products or services of the in- 
dustry shipped or performed by 
establishments in all industries 
($1,000) 



Total 
(produced 

or 
performed 
in all in- 
dustries) 



Produced 

or 

performed 

in this 

industry 



Produced 

or 

performed 

in other 
industries 



14 

U7 

K72 

1473 

1474 

1475 

1476 

1477 

1479 

14S 

1481 

1482 

149 

1492 

1493 

1494 

1495 

1496 

1497 

1498 

1499 



Nonmetallic minerals mining — Continued 
Chemical and fertilizer minerals: 

Barite 

Fluorspar 

Potash, soda, borate minerals 

Phosphate rock 

Rock salt 

Sulfur 

Chemical -fertilizer mining, nee... 

Nonmetallic minerals services: 

Nonmetallic minerals stripping. . . . , 
Nonmetallic minerals services, nee, 

Miscellaneous minerals, nee: 

Gypsum , 

Mica , 

Native asphalt and bitumens 

Pumice and pximicite , 

Talc, soapstone, pyrophyllite , 

Natural abrasives, except sand 

Peat , 

Nonmetallic minerals, nee , 



13,768 

19,977 

141,115 

132,094 

41,813 

106,202 

9,643 



4,787 
3,147 



7,048 
6,221 
8, Oil 
5,002 

14,908 
3,373 
4,379 

31,611 



(D) 

18,781 

138,807 

131,969 

37,623 

106,200 

(D) 



4,278 
3,004 



7,036 

6,103 

8,027 

(D) 

14,607 

(D) 

(D) 

31,493 



(D) 

(D) 
2,308 

(D) 

4,190 

2 

(D) 



4 
113 

(D) 
271 
(D) 
(D) 

111 



(D) 

(D) 

(D) 



(D) 



509 
143 



31,868 
15,443 

138,413 
99,036 
40,525 

106,200 
21,690 



4,317 
3,054 



^34,160 

10,490 

8,027 

5,006 

19,167 

3,510 

4,253 

31,349 



13,434 

15,443 

(D) 

99,036 

(D) 

106,200 

9,452 



4,278 
3,00i 



7,036 
6,103 
8,027 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



18,434 

(i)) 

(D) 
12,238 



39 

50 



■^27,124 
54,387 



(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 
(D) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual ocmpanies. 

^Represents gross shipnents of mercury metal only. 

Represents gross shipnents of titanium concentrates. 

•'Represents services performed in the two anthracite services industries only. 

^Includes the estimated value of minerals produced and used in the same manufacturing establishment in making manufactured products. 

^Represents gross shipnents. 

^Includes crude bentonite produced in other mineral industries, amounting to less than one percent of the figure shown. 

'Excludes crude bentonite. 



52 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 



Table 7— Quantity and Value of Mineral Products as Reported to the Bureau of the Census 
and to the Bureau of Mines for the United States, Alaska, and Hawaii: 1958 



Product 



Unit of measure 



Bureau of the Census statistics 



Production 
(quantity) 



Shipments, Including 
Interplant transfers 



Quantity- 



Value 
($1,000) 



Bureau of Mines statistics 



Production 
(quantity) 



Shipments 



Quantity 



Value 
($1,000) 



METAL ORES AND CONCENTRATES 

Iron ore, except inanganiferouB iron ore: 
Crude iron ore 



Net production and net shipments. 



1,000 long tons. 
...do 



ManganlferouB iron ore: 

Crude manganiferous iron ore. 
Net production and shipments. 



Copper, lead, zinc, gold, and silver ores 
(production and net shipments ) 

Metal content of copper, lead, zinc, 
gold, and silver-bearing materials:® 

Copper 

Lead 

ZIqc 

Gold 

Silver 



.do. 
.do. 



1,000 short tons. 



Copper ores: 

Crude ore mined in the Copper Ores 

Industry (production and net shipments) 
Copper concentrates 

Copper precipitates (Metal content).... 

Lead and zinc ores: 

Crude ore mined in the Lead and Zinc 
Ores Industry (production and net 
shipments ) 

Lead concentrates 

Zinc concentrates 



1,000 pounds 

...do 

...do 

1,000 fine ounces. 
...do 



Lode gold: 

Crude ore mined in the Lode Gold 
Industry (production and net 
shipments ) 

Gold concentrates 

Mill "bullion 



Production: 
1,000 short tons of 
ores or concentrates 

Shipments : 
1,000 pounds of 
metal contained 



Production: 
1,000 short tons of 
ores or concentrates 

Shipments : 
1,000 fine ounces of 
metal contained 



Placer gold 

Silver ores: 

Crude ore mined in the Silver Ores 
Industry (production and net 
shipments ) 

Silver concentrates and mill 
bullion 



1,000 fine ounces. 



Production : 
1,000 short tons of 
ores or concentrates 

Shipnents : 
1,000 fine ounces of 
metal contained 



Bauxite: 

Crude bauxite . . . . 
Prepared bauxite. 



1,000 long tons. 
...do 



Net shipments. 



Manganese ores: 

Crude manganese ores. 

Net shipments 



.do. 
.do. 



Tungsten ores: 

Crude tungsten ores... 
Tungsten concentrates. 

Chromium ores: 

Crude chromium ores . . . 
Chromium concentrates. 



1,000 short tons. 
...do 



.do. 
.do. 



Molybdenum concentrates . 



.do. 



Ifercury ores: 

Crude mercury ores . 
Mercury metal 



Flasks (70 pounds). 



Titanium ores: 

Crude titanium ores . . . 
Titanium concentrates . 



1,000 short tons. 
...do 



Uranium-radium-vanadium ores: 
Crude uranium-vanadium ores . . . 
Uranium-vanadium concentrates . 



.do. 
.do. 



108,381(- 
66,995 



k3^ 



^129,216 



1,955,911 

571,852 

927,1^07 

1,759 

55,577 



111,957 

5,507 

(NA) 



li^,^^05 
585 
758 



2,558 

28 

(NA) 

362.1 



496 
"21 



1,612 
136 



1,595 

XXX 



500 

(D) 
56 



^^ItOO 
^^3,812 



15,2lA 
606 



5,14-80 

59 



} 



^50,586 
^66,005 
=^68,121 



^409 



4,581^ 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



copper 
1,792,W9 
17lt,868 




gold 



157.5 
680.5 

562.5 



silver 

15, 25^+ 



1,662 

157 

'1,658 

'1,656 



508 
:2336 

3it6o 



150 

57 



(D) 
^^7,lW- 



598 



5,622 
59 



^511,292 
^606,729 
^621,799 

^5,0'f2 



29,417 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



21,622 

5l6,ll^7 

51,650 



5,181+ 
51^,815 
42,679 



/ 1,192 

>■ 3,790 

24,090 

12,580 



1,419 
11,674 



15,607 

2,548 

'17,089 

'17,555 



17,448 
^27,156 
252,776 



15,675 

6,001 
49,993 



(D) 
^8,402 



12,365 



91,505 
245,080 



109,815 
66,970 



(NA) 
(NA) 



154,516 



1,958,658 

554,754 

824,010 

1,759 

54,088 



^114, 824 
(NA) 
(NA) 



^16,554 
(NA) 
(NA) 



°2,5l8 
(NA) 
(NA) 

571 



"659 
(NA) 



1,584 
137 



(NA) 

XXX 



(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 



2°328 
58,067 



(NA) 
571 



5,178 



(NA) 
66,288 



(NA) 

''<;3i 



(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



\ copper 
/ ^,819,465 
198,000 



^515,818 



^768,214 



?old. 



"■110. 4 
^^692.5 

(MA) 



silver 

■^^12,910 



(NA) 
(NA) 

1,649 



(NA) 
'^526 



(NA) 
174 



144 
I621 



(NA) 

(NA) 



(NA) 
567 



(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
569,154 



(NA) 
*2,929 



(NA) 



^"515, 127 

^62,566 

■^84,115 
■^60,874 
■^50,851 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

''12,984 



(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

15,984 



(NA) 
^24,l4o 



(NA) 
■^5,991 



6,187 
50,571 



(NA) 
8,720 



(NA) 
U,565 



^116,515 
^258,000 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 



53 



Table 7— Quantity and Value of Mineral Products as Reported to the Bureau of the Census 
and to the Bureau of Mines for the United States, Alaska, and Hawaii: 1958— Continued 



Product 



tkilt of measure 



Bureau of the Census statistics 



Production 
(quantity) 



Shipments, including 
interplant transfers 



Quantity 



Value 
($1,000) 



Bureau of Mines statistics 



Production 
(quantity) 



Shipments 



Quantity 



Value 
($1,000) 



MEIAL ORES AND CQUGBfTRAIES — Continued 

Bastnaeslte and moneizite concentrates — 

Beryllium concentrates 

Zirconium concentrates 

Antimony concentrates, platinum, and 
thorium concentrates 



Short tons. 

...do 

...do 



COAL 

Anthracite: 

Net production and net shipments. 

Bituminous coal: 

Net production and net shipments . 

Lignite: 

Net production and net shipments. 

OIL AND GAS 



1,000 short tons. 



.do. 



Crude petroleum 

Field condensate and drips. 
Natural gas 



1,000 barrels. 
...do 



Natural gas liquids: 

Net production and net shipments . 



Million cu. ft. 
1,000 barrels.. 



NONMETALLIC MDIERAI£, EXCEPT FTffilS 



Dimension stone, total. 

Rough (net ) 

Dressed 



1,000 short tons. 



Limestone, total. 

Rough (net ) . . . . 
Dressed 

Granite , total . . . 

Rough (net).. .. 
Dressed 



Stone, nee, total. 

Rough (net) 

Dressed 



Crushed and broken stone (net), total. 



...do. 
...do. 

...do. 

...do. 
...do. 

...do. 

...do. 
...do. 

...do. 

...do. 
...do. 

...do. 



Excluding Federal, State, and local 
government operations 



Commerc lal 

Government and contractor. 

Limestone^^ 

Granite^^ 

Stone, neo^^ 



.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



Conmon sand , total 

Excluding Federal, State, and local 
government operations 



.do. 



Commerc lal 

Government and contractor. 



.do. 
.do. 



Glass sand. 



Uolding sand. 



Gravel, total. 



.do. 
.do. 



Excluding Federal, State, and local 
government operations 



Commercial 

Government and contractor. 



.do. 
.do. 



Beutonite: 

Crude bentonite 

Prepared bentonite 

Net shipments by the bentonite industry 

Fire clay: 

Crude fire clay 

Prepared fire clay 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 



5,663 

36,458 



22,258 

413,580 
1^,231 



^^2,319,162 

(NA) 

12,152,585 

294,192 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

3^84,592 

(NA) 
(NA) 

3.^588,360 
3^3,812 
3-^62,420 

(NA) 

3^232,708 

(NA) 
(NA) 

7,446 

7,763 

(NA) 

33306,042 

(NA) 
(NA) 



*1,705 
(NA) 

XXX 



388,724 
(NA) 



1,074 

474 

40,73"* 



/ ^21,630 
\ 2=22,3lH 

417,075 
4,231 



2,317,565 

48,647 

10,134,236 

294,887 



2,957 
1,662 
1,295 

1,129 

705 

424 

807 

333 

474 

1,021 
624 
397 
(NA) 

405, 240 

(NA) 
(NA) 

309,491 
33,812 
61,937 

(NA) 

^219, 407 

(NA) 
(NA) 

7,tei 

7,709 
(NA) 

^292, 516 

(NA) 
(NA) 

3=3 96 

1,3'*3 

3^1,558 



3,517 
1,033 



250 

215 

1,678 

^3,157 



^197,218 
^^196,425 



2,062,l40 
11,021 



6,93't,158 

148,036 

1,29^,271 

699,328 



80,559 

18,613 
61,9^6 

18,331 

7,009 

11,322 

29,827 

3,711 
26, U6 

32,1*01 

7,893 
24,508 

(NA) 

616,649 

(NA) 
(NA) 

459,564 

49,961 

107,124 

(NA) 

3219,246 

(NA) 
(NA) 

21,955 
19,021 

(NA) 

3309,606 

(NA) 
(NA) 



3^1,394 

21,813 

3^16,505 



13,589 
6,070 



(NA) 

465 

50,443 



21,171 

408,019 
2,427 

} 2,448,987 
15,1^*6,655 

29^,71*9 

^^2,522 

3°1,220 

3°1,502 

29979 

2951^2 

29^57 

2^621 

2^281 
29540 

29922 
3O397 
30525 

23535, 1*01 

(NA) 

29485,651* 
2949,767 

2^590,468 

^^1,557 

29111,596 

2°250,451 

(NA) 
^*200,371 

2930,080 

^^5,575 
^^5,652 

291^1^2,840 

(NA) 

29277,716 
29165, 124 



(NA) 

(NA) 

9l,291 



98,808 



987 
465 
(NA) 



20,976 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
2^11,050,248 

292,128 



(NA) 



(NA) 

238 

2*1,248 

(NA) 



186,665 

'1,990,575 
285,706 



"7,579,975 
31,517,492 

2^689,710 



(NA) 


2980,254 


(NA) 
(NA) 


^°62,102 


(NA) 


^^18,757 


(NA) 
(NA) 


294,239 
29i4,5i8 


(NA) 


2924,059 


(NA) 
(NA) 


299,419 
29i4,640 


(NA) 


=^7,1*38 


(NA) 
(NA) 


3032, 9-W 


(NA) 


29746,451 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 
(NA) 


29694,801 
^^51,650 


(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


^^516,765 

2945,452 

29184,254 


(NA) 


29220,586 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 
(NA) 


2=205,428 
29i6,958 


(NA) 


2917,858 


(NA) 


2912,827 


(NA) 


29401,718 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 
(NA) 


29291,170 
29110,548 


(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


(NA) 

(NA) 

^^15,517 



2940,420 



See footnotes at end of table. 



54 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-SUMMARY STATISTICS 



Table 7.— Quantity 
and to the Bureau 



and Value of Mineral Products as Reported to the Bureau of the Census 
of Mines for the United States, Alaska, and Hawaii: I 958— Continued 



Product 



Unit of measure 



Bureau of the Census statistics 



Production 
(quantity) 



Shipments, including 
interplant transfers 



Quantity 



Value 
($1,000) 



Bureau of Mines statistics 



Production 
(quantity) 



Shipments 



Quantity 



Value 
($1,000) 



NOKMETALLIC MINERALS. EXCEPT FUELS - 
Continued 

Fuller's earth: 

Net shipments 



1,000 short tons. 



Kaolin and ball clay: 

Crude kaolin and ball clay.... 
Prepared kaolin and ball clay. 

Feldspar: 

Crude feldspar 

Prepared feldspar 



...do. 
...do. 



.do. 
.do. 



Common clay and shale: ■^" 

Crude common clay and shale . 

Prepared common clay and shale. 



.do. 



.do. 



Magneslte and brucite 

Aplite, kyanite, later ite, and olivine. 

Barite: 

Crude barite 

Prepared barite 

Net shipments by the barite industry. 

Fluorspar: 

Production and shipments: 

Crude fluorspar 

Prepared fluorspar 

Net shipments 



.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 



Crude fluorspar prepared. 



Potash, soda, borate minerals: 
Potassium salts: 

Crude salts 

Processed or refined salts. 



.do. 
.do. 



SodiiM carbonates. 

Sodium sulfate 

Boron compoimds . . . 



..do. 
..do. 
..do. 



Phosphate rock: 

Crude ore or matrix 

Washed or concentrated 

Dried, calcined, or sintered. 

Net shipments 



1,000 long tons . 

...do 

...do 



.do. 



Rock salt 

Native sulfur and sulfur ore. 



Frasch process sulfur. 
Sulfur ore 



1,000 short tons. 
1,000 long tons.. 
...do 



Pyrites 

Elemental sulfur. 



..do. 
..do. 
..do. 



Gypsum: 

Crude 

Prepared (crushed, groimd, screened, 
or dried) 



1,000 short tons. 
...do 



Mica: 

Hand-cobbed mica 

Sheet mica 

Scrap (or flake) mica. 
Ground mica 



1,000 pounds. 

...do 

Short tons . . . 
...do 



Native asphalt and bitumens: 

Gilsonite 

Bituminous limestone and sandstone. 

Pumice and pumicite 



1,000 short tons. 
...do 



Talc, soapstone, and pyrophyllite : 

Crude 

Prepared 



.do. 
.do. 



Natural abrasives, except sand. 
Peat 



Asbestos, crude and prepared. 

Diatomite , prepared 

Perlite: 

Crude 

Prepared*^ 



Other nonmetallic minerals : 

Crude 

Prepared 



.do. 
.do. 
.do. 
.do. 

.do. 
.do. 

.do. 
.do. 



=^^,0lt4 
(NA) 

506 
(NA) 

"^51,685 
(NA) 

3*508 
(NA) 



608 
(NA) 



856 
568 

XXX 

921 



12,22h 
5,710 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

46,031 
12,636 
11,7^^7 



(NA) 

k,6k2 
12 

1,025 

669 

-^39,384 
(NA) 

3,to7 

1^07 

106,326 

(NA) 

517 
1,298 

2,093 

726 
(NA) 

66 

366 

lf58 

36if 
278 

206 
204 



285 

^=314 
2,311 

120 
465 

2,044 
3,649 

154 
234 



148 
°1,120 

603 



96 
366 
275 

(NA) 



4,002 

639 
344 

^559 

3,162 

8,492 

11,817 

^15,182 

-15,605 

25,447 

4,619 

4,607 
12. 

Z>11 
628 



737 
3,829 

3,395 

4o6 

48,478 

114,892 



321 
1,298 

2,075 



^237 
600 

65 
365 

i^ 
452 

18 
265 

2 
209 



6,778. 

2=3,066 
44,598 

866 
6,608 

3,034 
26,191 

7,270 
2,777 



1,402 

*°50,466 

13,434 



1,785 
16,996 
15,443 

(NA) 



82,468 

17,175 

6,495 

232,275 

8,922 

4l,607 

81,440 

290,105 

^299, 036 

240,525 
106,200 

105,995 
205 

2,392 

16,465 



1,4U 
15,939 

849 
2,702 

989 
5,950 

4,700 
3,327 
5,486 

^1,574 
17,593 

3,510 

4,253 

24,900 

20,114 

92 
2,512 

35 
5,696 



29358 


(NA) 


^2,619 


(NA) 


526 

(NA) 


29470 
470 


30,674 


(NA) 


633 


2^642 


3 9486 

^1,014 

XXX 


(NA) 
*^1.027 

2%05 


818 

(NA) 

XXX 


(NA) 
(NA) 
320 


815 


(NA) 


12,224 
3,640 


(NA) 
(NA) 


(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


2^629 
347 
528 


46,459 
12,360 
11,486 


(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


XXX 


2^14,714 


(NA) 


2^5,1^07 


4,646 


4,798 


4,643 
6 


4,644 
154 


974 


(NA) 


642 


(NA) 


9,600 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


^478 

*'^66i 

93,347 
97,529 


(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


317 
1,326 


(NA) 
(NA) 


^1,973 


(NA) 


*=7l8 
^=633 


(NA) 
(NA) 


''^69 


(KA) 


328 


(NA) 


44 


(NA) 


2^1^38 


(NA) 



372 

29292 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



297,609 
2941,924 



=94,278 
6,540 



2'38,216 
294,572 



(NA) 
^28,352 
2^7,510 



(NA) 

(NA) 

15,071 

(NA) 



(NA) 
=^75,000 

=^17,032 

6,716 

38,310 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

'^92,769 

-^7,125 

110,777 

109,272 

1,505 

^^7,987 

(NA) 



2^32,495 
(NA) 

(NA) 
**2,844 
292,065 
=^5,560 

2^4,864 
2^3,343 
295,287 

*=4,718 
^=13,856 

*^1,474 

2^3,446 

265,127 

2920,216 



(NA) 
292,464 



} 264^387 



See footnotes on next page. 



GENERAL SUMMARY 55 

FOOTNOTES— TABLE 7 

D Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. 
MA Not available. 

"■Manganlferous iron ore is included with "Iron ore, except manganiferous iron ore." 

^Represents gross shipments less receipts from other establlsliments foi- preparation. For iron ore, see also footnote 1. 
^Represents shipments of direct-shipping ore, concentrates to consumers, and agglomerates. 
*Represents manganiferous iron ore and for Minnesota ferruginous manganese ore. 

Represents only ores mined in the Copper Ores, Lead and Zlno Ores, Lode Gold, and Silver Ores Industries. 

'Census quantity figures represent gross metal content, and all figures except those for placer gold exclude Alaska. Bureau of Mines quantity 
figures represent recoverable metal content of mine production. 

^Estimated by the Bureau of Mines from the quantity of mine production and an average price. For copper, lead, and zinc, represents the weighted 
average unit price of domestic refined metals delivered to purchases. For gold, represents the price under authority of the Gold Reserve Act of 
January 31, 19'*'*. For silver, represents the Treasury buying price for newly mined silver. 
Represents "copper ore" sold or treated. Shipments represent recoverable content. 

Represents "lead ore," "zinc ore," "lead-zinc ore," and "copper-lead, copper-zinc, and copper-lead-zlnc ores." Shipments represent recoverable 
content . 

^Represents "gold ore" and "gold-silver ore" produced. Shipments represent recoverable content. 

^^Represents metal contained in "gold ore" and "gold-silver ore" produced less mill bullion produced. Shipments represent recoverable content. 

^Represents production. 

^Represents "silver ore" produced. 

^Represents concentrates only. 

^Represents recoverable metal contained in "silver ore" and mill bullion. 

^Represents manganese ore (35 percent or more manganese) and ferruginous manganese ore except in Minnesota. These shipments represent marketable 
ores from the consumer's standpoint; besides direct-shipping ore, they include without duplication concentrates and nodules made from domestic ores. 

^Represents concentrates from domestic ores. Census figures include concentrates produced in the United States from imported material. 

^Represents molybdenum content of concentrates . 

^Rxcludes figures for Alaska. The Bureau of Mines showed production of 5,580 flasks of mercury in Alaska. 

^Represents mercury ores treated. 

^■^The value of mercury metal produced in Alaska is excluded from the figure for mercury metal and included with the value of "Antimony concentrates, 
platinum, and thorium concentrates. 

^Represents value of production f.o.b. mine. 

^^Represents tonnage of IbOg contained in uranium concentrates produced. 

^*Estimated from the quantity of mine production and the year-end price of zircon concentrates at Jacksonville. 

^Represents raw coal shipped for use without preparation plus prepared coal. 

^'Represents value of production. 

^Represents crude petroleum shipped plus crude petrolexmi produced and used in the same establishment In lease operations . 

^Represents marketed production, "comprising gas sold or consumed by producers, including losses in transmission, amounts added to storage, and 
increases in gas in pipe lines." Census figures show 562,731 million cubic feet of gas produced and used in the same establishment in lease opera- 
tions and net increase in underground storage of 12,368 million cubic feet; these figures are not included in the Census shipments figures shown. 

^Represents minerals sold or used by producers . 

^Rigures for rough monumental marble are included with those for dressed monumental marble. See also footnote 29. 

^^Represents stone shipments plus stone mined and used in the same establishment in making cement, lime, and other manufactured products. Figures 
for a small tonnage of granite mined and used in the same establishment are excluded from the Granite figures and included with those for Stone, nee. 

^^Census figures exclude operations by Federal, State, and local governments. Bureau of Mines figures represent totals for all stone sold or used 
by commercial. Government, and contractor operations. For Alaska and Hawaii, Census figures for Granite are included with those for Limestone. For 
Hawaii, Census shipments figures include the quantity and estimated value of limestone mined and used in the same establishment in making lime. 

^^Figures for Common sand exclude and figures for Gravel include sand produced in Alaska and Hawaii. 

^Represents quantity mined and prepared in the same establishment plus quantity of crude net shipments. 

^Represents net shipments by mineral industries. 

^'includes shipments of crude bentonite by mineral industries other than Bentonlte. 

■'''census figures exclude Hawaii. 

^%epresents quantity mined and used in the same establishment in making cement, clay products, ana prepared clay plus quantity of crude clay shipped. 

^Represents mine or plant output of primary barite. 

*°Includes some barite that was prepared by washing only. 

*'''Represents crushed and ground barite sold by producers. 

*^Represents shipments of crude ore or matrix, except to washer or concentrator; washed or concentrated rock, except to drier; and dried, calcined, 
or sintered rock. 

'^-'in addition to gypsum mined for shipment in crude or prepared form, includes 5*581 tons of gypsum valued at approximately $21, 17^^ thousand, 
produced and used in the same establishment in the manufacture of calcined gypsum products. 

■*Represents sheet mica plus full-trlramed equivalent of hand-cobbed mica. See also footnote 29. 

*Rxcludes dimension soapstone. For crude material, see also footnote 26, and for prepared material, see also footnote 29. 

''Represents minerals sold or used by producers. For tripoli included, represents value of crude material. 

''^Includes simple preparation methods, such as drying and crushing; does not include expansion. 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 

57 



58 




NEW ENGLAND 

59 



60 



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CNJ 
I— H 

CO 



O 
CO 



CD 



E < 



E O 




CD 






V) 
V) 

z 

UJ 

o 



3 
< 

UJ 

q: 
ffi 



a: 
< 

UJ 

Z) 

z 

O 




LjJ 



<3>0 



— LU 



o 



O 
o 



O 
CM 



in o 

SQNVSnOHl Nl 



lO 



< 

Ql 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
New England 
Tabic 1.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations; 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 



61 





Establish- 
ments, 
number 


A-] -1 A*in 




Production 


and 


Value 

added 

In 

mining 

($1,000) 


Selected expenses ($1,000) 


Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ^ 

($1,000) 


Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 

($1,000) 


Energy used 

(k«h 
equivalent ) 






development workers 


Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 


Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 


Con- 
tract 
work 


Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
In- 
stalled 


Kind of operation 
and year 


To- 
tal 


20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 


Number 


Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 


Number 


Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 


Wages 

($1,000) 


Total 

(mil- 
lion) 


Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 


Mineral industries 
only: 
1958 


344 
385 

443 

456 

*332 

354 

302 

519 

^746 


39 

40 

58 

56 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


3,616 
4,069 

6,521 
5,988 
4,944 
9,187 

7,837 
17,959 
18,041 


17,477 
15,683 

29,670 

23,142 

6,603 

14,553 

9,251 
10,747 
11,111 


2,745 
3,456 

5,230 
5,232 
4,272 
8,384 

7,213 
17,136 
"■16,741 


5,744 
7,581 

10,852 

11,149 

8,659 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


11,760 
12,434 

21,527 

18,950 

4,863 

12,241 

8,036 
9,848 
9,974 


32,301 
32,104 

53,958 
46,785 
14,415 
26,202 

14,915 
14,559 
14,838 


11,496 
8,808 

2l6,ln6 

^11,861 

3,362 

4,429 

3,620 
2,658 
2,770 


122 
135 

550 
454 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 


1,392 
1,166 

^1,603 

^1,361 

37 

64 

198 

111 

2 


2,693 
3,404 

^3,715 

(NA) 

1,411 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


44,034 
41,325 

71,232 
59,559 
17,814 
30,695 

18,733 
17,328 
17,610 


3,970 
4,292 

^4,669 

^4,617 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


711 

541 

3638 
404 
680 

'435 
(NA) 
(NA) 


259 
157 


1954 


Including operations 
in manufactures: 
1958 


167 
122 


195^* 


1939' 


95 


1929'' 

1919*.." 

1909* 

1902^° 


81 

60 
(NA) 
(NA) 





NA Not available. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of miner- 
als produced and used in the same establishment in making manufactured products. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of shipments 
(or production for 1919 and 1909) and contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for prepara- 
tion. The approximate magnitude of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for the cost of minerals received for preparation. For other 
years, represents net production and excludes this duplication. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is included 
with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

■'Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations, and for one dimension granite mining operation, in manufacturing establishments. 

'Except, in part, for value of shipments and value added, excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction with quarries. 
Excludes data for one nonproducing operation in Maine. 

^Represents number of mines and quarries. 

'Excludes data for common clay and shale and peat operations. There were 27 such mines in 1939; the value of products of 24 of these mines was 
$142 thousand. 

*Excludes data for sand and gravel operations and stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime establishments. There were 53 such es- 
tablishments in 1929; the value of products of 51 of these establishments was $3,299 thousand. For 1919, excludes data for two nonproducing es- 
tablishments. See also footnote 7. 

'Excludes purchased electricity. For 1929, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to about 8 percent of the total kwh equivalent of 
energy used. 

^"Excludes data for sand, gravel, common clay, and shale operations. Includes data for lime plants producing lime valued at $1,490 thousand. 
^ ^Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 



62 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
New England 
Table 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 



(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Industry group and industry 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All en^iloyees 



Number 



PL.y- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development vrorkers 



Man- 
hours 



(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



f 1,0 00) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
nuniber 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



1«1 



UAl 



U56 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures 

Metal mining 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures 

Dimension stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures .... 
Dimension granite 

Mineral subindustry 

Included in manufactures.... 
Dimension stone, neo 

Included in manufactures.... 

Crushed and broken stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures .... 
Crushed and broken limestone 
(Mineral subindustry only) — 

Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures . — 
Common sand and gravel (Miner- 
al subindustry only) 

Clay and related minerals: 

Feldspar 

Clay and related minerals, nee 
(included in manufactures ).. . 

Miscellaneous minerals , nee 



<;43 

99 



439 
340 
99 
54 
17 
37 
27 
10 
17 
27 
20 



60 

53 

7 

12 

255 

222 

33 

215 



6,521 
'3,616 
^2,905 

33 

6,200 
3,295 
'2,905 
2,831 

204 
2,627 
1,225 

156 
1,069 
1,606 
1,558 



1,210 

1,094 

3116 

224 

1,529 

1,402 

^127 

1,365 



77 



^35 



499 



29,670 
'17,477 
'12,193 

185 

27,281 

15,088 

'12,193 

11,771 

803 

10,968 

5,927 

658 

5,269 

5,844 

5,699 



6,106 

5,574 

'532 

883 

7,083 

6,531 

'552 

6,381 



288 

'141 

1,823 



5,230 

2,745 

'2,485 

31 

5,199 

2,714 

'2,485 

2,393 

186 

2,207 

1,074 

143 

931 

1,319 

1,276 



1,021 

905 

'116 

192 

1,243 

1,116 

^127 

1,082 



62 
'35 
431 



10,852 
5,744 
5,108 

61 

10,791 
5,683 
5,108 
4,914 

362 
4,552 
2,139 

278 
1,861 
2,775 
2,691 



2,303 

2,071 

232 

458 

2,518 

2,265 

253 

2,189 



138 

71 

820 



21,527 

11,760 

9,767 

174 

21,353 

11,586 

9,767 

9,236 

694 

8,542 

4,709 

563 

4,146 

4,527 

4,396 



4,880 

4,348 

532 

724 

5,420 

4,868 

552 

4,735 



200 

141 

1,431 



53,958 
32,301 
21,657 

440 

53,518 

31,861 

21,657 

14,924 

1,037 

13,887 

8,801 

918 

7,883 

6,123 

6,004 



14,872 

11,022 

3,850 

1,392 

18,104 

14,762 

3,342 

14,367 



342 
578 

4,451 



^21,943 
15,703 
^6,240 

76 

^21,867 

15,627 

^6,240 

5,749 

380 

5,369 

3,098 

329 

2,769 

2,651 

2,600 



^6,551 

6,113 

=438 

917 

^7,186 

6,821 

2365 

6,704 



270 



1,925 



'71,232 
44,034 
'27,198 

516 

'70,716 

43,518 

'27,198 

19,872 

1,315 
18,557 
11,621 

1,179 
10,442 

8,251 

8,115 



'20,408 
16,120 
'4,288 

2,061 

'22,987 
19,280 
'3,707 

18,783 



583 

'646 

5,957 



■'4,669 

3,970 

■'699 



''4,669 

3,970 

''699 

801 

102 

699 

278 

68 

210 

523 

489 



(MA) 

1,015 

(NA) 

248 

(NA) 

2,303 

(NA) 

2,288 



29 

(NA) 
419 



5,988 
^4,069 
'1,919 

269 

55, 719 
'3,800 
'1,919 
2,268 

■2,268 

1,535 
199 

1,336 

733 

(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

130 

(NA) 

1,437 

(NA) 

(NA) 



156 
(NA) 



46, 785 
32,104 
14,681 

1,697 

45,088 
30,407 
14,681 
12,806 

12,806 

9,624 
1,094 
8,530 
3,182 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

735 

(NA) 

12,318 

(NA) 

(NA) 



858 
(NA) 



NA Not available. 

■"■Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations, and for one dimension granite mining operation, in manufacturing establishments. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machinery 
installed . 

'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the number of production and development 
workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same figures are 
included for production and development workers and for all employees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes the estimated 
value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment. 

''Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'includes data for separately reported central offices and related facilities in the Bituminous Coal Industry. 

^Includes data for separately reported central offices and related facilities in the Oil and Gas Extraction Industries. 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 

New England 

Tabic 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



63 





Industry gro\jp and industry 


Selected expenses ($1,000) 


Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 


Net shipments of primary products^ 


Ind. 
code 


Total 


Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 


Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 


Con- 
tract 
work 


Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 


Total 


De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 


Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 


By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 


By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 




Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 


Value 
($1,000) 


Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 


Value 
($1,000) 


10 


All mineral industries 


15,703 

76 

15,627 
6,113 
6,821 
6,704. 

1,925 


11,496 

66 

11,430 
4,988 
"4, 542 
"4,456 

1,431 


122 

122 

(M 
(*) 


1,392 

10 

1,382 
324 
798 

781 

224 


2,693 

2,693 

801 
1,481 
1,467 

270 


3,970 

3,970 
1,015 
2,303 
2,288 

419 


131 

131 

7 

118 


3,839 

3,839 
1,011 
2,296 
2,288 

301 


XXX 
XXX 
XXX 

7,763 
17,037 
16,866 

XXX 


XXX 
XXX 
XXX 

15,426 
'22,872 
'22,438 

XXX 


XXX 
XXX 
XXX 

^2,164 
^4,037 
^4,052 

XXX 


XXX 
XXX 
XXX 

^5,387 
(') 

XXX 


li, 
U9 


Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Crushed and broken stone 

Sand and gravel 

Common sand and gravel 

Miscellaneous minerals , nee 



^Represents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

^Includes minerals produced and used in the same manufacturing establishment. The value of such minerals was estimated. 

*The cost of minerals received for preparation is included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

'Figures for the value of shipments of primary products by establishments classified in other industries are included with those for the value of 
shipments of primary products by establishments classified in the specified industry. Includes the estimated value of minerals produced and used in 
the same manufacturing establishment. 



64 MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 

New England 

Table 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Mining only 



Total 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Comb illa- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods '^ 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 


Nonpro 


rately 


ducing 


oper- 


estab- 


ated 


lish- 


prepa- 


ments 


ration 




plants 





10 



1^21 



l^il 



149 



All industries: 

Number of establishments . . . . 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Metal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1, 000 . . 

Nonmetallic minerals mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Crushed and broken stone: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1, 000 . . 

Common sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. , 

Miscellaneous minerals, nee: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1, 000 . , 



342 
^3,616 

■^32.301 



337 
''3,303 

'^32,315 



1 
(D) 



120 
417 

3,591 



*440 



339 
■^1,295 

'^31,861 



53 
1,094 

11,022 



222 
1,402 

14,762 



215 
1,365 

14,367 



35 
499 

4,451 



(D) 



336 
(D) 

(D) 



53 
1,094 

11,022 



221 
(D) 



(D) 



214 
(D) 

(D) 



34 

(D) 

(D) 



120 
417 

3,591 



83 

(D) 

(D) 



82 
(D) 

(D) 



140 



98 
376 

3,219 



372 



214 
2,832 

28,341 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



9 

166 

1,424 



98 
376 

3,219 



62 
253 

2,565 



61 
(D) 

(D) 



140 



372 



21 
(D) 

(D) 



21 
(D) 

(D) 



213 
(D) 

(D) 



49 
(D) 

(D) 



136 
1,102 

11,847 



131 
1,068 

11,486 



23 

(D) 

(D) 



9 
166 

1,424 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



7 
(D) 

(D) 



188 
2,442 

24,115 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



187 
(D) 

(D) 



48 
1,044 

10,716 



119 
878 

9,045 



114 
844 



8,684 



16 
341 

3,164 



17 
224 

2,802 



3 

(D) 

(D) 



17 
224 

2,802 



17 
224 

2,802 



17 
224 

2,802 



3 
27 

54 

1 
(D) 

(D) 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



5 

25 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



3 

(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

■"■Includes data for 20 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
^Includes data for 13 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 

^Includes data for employees at separately reported central offices and related facilities in the Bituminous Coal Industry. See also foo"tnote 4. 
^Includes data for mining services operations . 

'Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded capital 
expenditures . - 



Table 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954 

(For county statistics, see ■table 5 of the indi^vidual State Reports) 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 

New England 
Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group: 1958 



6 5 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Gold and silver ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 Metal mining services 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 
120 Bituminous coal and lignite 



12C Coal mining services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

141 Dimension stone 

141M Dimension stone in manufactures 

142 Crushed and broken stone 

142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 
144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel in manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals In manufactures 
147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

146 Nonmetallic minerals services 
149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c, in 

manufactures 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


Division and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied tn 
mineral 
indus- 
tries 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108 


109 


120 


12C 


131 


132 


138 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148 


149 


149 
M 


New England , total . . 

No employees 

1-4 employees 

5-9 employees 

10-19 employees . . . 
20-49 employees . . . 
50-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 
250-499 employees. 
1,000 employees 


443 

39 

173 

94 

79 

39 

12 

5 

1 

1 


344 

31 

131 

81 

62 

31 

5 

3 


99 

8 

42 

13 

17 

8 

7 

2 

1 

1 


... 


3 










1 










:= 




17 

1 
10 

1 
4 


37 

6 
5 
9 
7 
6 
2 
1 

1 


53 

1 

3 

14 

16 

13 

5 

1 


7 

3 
3 

1 


222 

19 
101 
55 
35 
12 


33 

3 
20 
4 
5 
1 


11 

3 
3 
2 
1 
2 


22 

5 
16 

1 


1 
1 


1 
1 


35 

7 
11 
7 
6 
3 
















2 

1 
























































1 


















































1 














1 





















































































































MIDDLE ATLANTIC 



67 



68 





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LO 






CD 






'— • 






CVJ 






CD 






O^ 






1— 1 






00 




CD 


CD 






-♦— * 




^■^ 


o 




:z 


.<T3 


O 




CD 



I- 






o 

LU 

X 



3 
< 
UJ 

cr 
m 



UJ 
O 







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Ui 



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Q. 
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SQNVSnOHl Nl 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
Middle Atlantic 
Tabic 1— General Statistics for Mineral Operations; 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 



69 



Kind of operation 
and year 



Establish- 
ments, 
number 



To- 
tal 



20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

a,ooo) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added 

In 

mining 



($1,000) 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 

elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
in- 
stalled 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ^ 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



Energy used 

(kwh 
equivalent) 



Total 

(mil- 
lion) 



Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 



Mineral industries 
only: 

1958 

1954 



Including operations 
in manufactures: 

All operations: 

1958 

1954' 

1939* 

1919* 

1909* 

1902^^ 

Excluding oil and 
gas extraction 
industries: 

1958 

1954' 

1939* 

1929^3 

1919* 

1909* 

1902^* 



4,500 
5,320 



4,750 
5,541 
''3,953 

6,617 
6,776 
1^873 



3,685 
4,129 
'2,724 
2,197 
2,913 
3,022 
'3,689 



636 

782 



683 
842 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



633 
786 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



87,398 
120,795 



90,387 
124,321 
219,481 

353,656 
389,688 
209,066 



83,810 
114,032 
208,692 
301,203 
341,742 
381,502 
199,399 



418,758 
483,943 



431,426 
497,033 
297,502 

495,393 
219,258 
128,937 



402,378 
457,140 
281,431 
457,186 
481,121 
213,584 
121,566 



72,795 
105,017 



75,702 
108,461 
203,871 

334,285 
377,037 
^^8,781 



70,519 
100,313 
194,857 
286,562 
324,351 
369,949 
^^19^527 



124,374 
177,172 



130,121 
184,141 
317,732 

(MA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



120,026 
168,006 
301,213 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



324,407 
392,232 



336,614 
404,916 
259,280 

458,243 
205,205 
118,549 



316,476 
377,011 
247,814 
419,395 
446,936 
200,823 
112,792 



733,341 
^767,158 



779,189 
^800,722 
428,317 

681,095 
305,775 
203,982 



719,972 
^726, 918 
376,747 
622,264 
625,186 
276,609 
184,077 



208,131 
189,381 



3 216, 227 

^198,416 

83,386 

155,735 
55,230 
32,969 



^201,502 

^181, 001 

78,310 

116,808 

143,766 

49,369 

26,445 



164,191 
^177,420 



164,236 

^77,431 

(NA) 

'8,202 

'3,165 

(NA) 



81,853 
102,288 



^81,874 

^2,367 

17,539 

8,859 
6,572 
5,996 



162,774 


^69,557 


^7,350 


^79,495 


(NA) 


12,395 


(NA) 


7,738 


5,077 


3,689 


28 


2,870 


(NA) 


930 



65,188 
68,629 



■^65,407 

^68,717 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



*61,082 
"^61,071 
(NA) 
18,334 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,160,015 
%229,313 



1,213,971 

^271,938 

529,242 

853,891 
370,742 
242,947 



1,137,262 
^,171,218 
467,452 
746,810 
777,718 
328,876 
211,452 



92,689 
75,539 



*92,962 

■^75,691 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



*77,625 
■^54,617 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



14,926 
19,300 



^^14,958 

'19,360 

30,072 

%54p53 

(Ni) 

(NA) 



205 
184 



198 
178 
148 

312 
(NA) 
(NA) 



■'12,980 


184 


*16,956 


169 


27,456 


141 


56,520 


197 


'°U3£p22 
(NA) 


311 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 



NA Not available. 

■^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment in making manufactured products. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of ship- 
ments (or production for 1919 and 1909) and contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to anoilier for prep- 
aration. The approximate magnitude of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other 
years represents net production and excludes this duplication. For years prior to 1958, excludes the value of residue gas from natural gas liquids 
plants . 

^Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. For minerals received for preparation at natural gas liquids plants, excludes the 
cost of natural gas processed, but includes the estimated value prior to processing of natural gas liquids contained in such gas. 

For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is 
included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

^Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manuf actiiring establishments. For New Jersey in 
1958, also excludes data for dimension stone operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Except, in part, for value of shipments and value added in mining, excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction with 
quarries. Except for number of establishments, excludes data for nonproducing operations in New Jersey as follows: One iron ore mine and one trap rock 
quarry and crushing plant. For "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries," includes data for one nonproducing crude petroleum and natural gas 
establishment in Pennsylvania. 

''Represents number of mines and quarries, number of natural gas liquids plants, and, for crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services 
industries, number of operating companies. 

*Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations and for stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime establishments. There were 141 
such sand and gravel establishment in 1929, with products valued at $26,003 thousand and 46 such stone operations at 46 establishments (the value of 
qiETty products at 44 of these establishments was $6,531 thousand.) See also footnote 13. For "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries" in 1909, 
except for number of establishments, includes data for 2 nonproducing oil and gas extraction operations. 

^Includes natural gas purchased for resale. 
•"■"Excludes purchased electricity. For "All operations" in 1939, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to only 5 percent of the total kwh 
equivalent of energy used; and for "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries" in 1929, to 2 percent. 

■'■■'^Exoludes data for sand, gravel, common clay, and shale raining operations and, except for 2 operations in New Jersey, for crushed and broken stone 
quarries operated as parts of cement establishments. Includes data for lime plants producing lime valued at $2,114 thousand and for 2 cement plants 
in {Jew Jersey. 
^^Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 
•^•'Excludes data for common clay and shale mining operations. In 1939, there were 105 such mines with products valued at $1,182 thousand. 
^*Includes data for nonproducing oil and gas extraction operations in Pennsylvania. See also footnote 11. 



70 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
Middle Atlantic 



Table 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Industry group and industry 



Total 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 



(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



19 5i^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($l,000j 



10 

1011 
106 

11 

1111 
1112 
1113 

12 
1211 
1213 
1214 

13 
1311 



138 
1381 



14 



1421 



1441 



145 
1453 



1459 



1498 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures... 

Metal mining 

Iron ores 

Ferroalloy ores 

Anthracite mining 

Anthracite 

Anthracite stripping services.. 
Anthracite mining services, neo 

Bituminous coal mining 

Bituminous coal 

Coal stripping services, neo... 
Coal mining services, nee 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 

Oil and gas field services 

Drilling oil and gas wells 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures 

Dimension stone 

Dimension limestone 

Dimension granite 

Dimension stone, nee 

Mineral subindustry 

Included in manufactures... 

Cinished and broken stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures... 

Crushed and broken limestone 
(mineral subindustry only) . . 

Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures... 

Common sand and gravel 
(mineral subindustry only).. 

Glass sand 

Molding sand 

Clay and related minerals, nee. 

Fire clay. 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures . . . 

Clay and related mineral, nee 
Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures... 

Miscellaneous minerals, nee . 

Gypsum 

Peat 



4,750 

4,500 

250 

25 

12 
4 

1,248 

1,163 

79 

6 

1,373 

1,312 

56 

5 

1,065 
870 
668 
202 

188 
106 

1,039 
789 
250 

108 
14 



46 
40 

300 

253 

47 

178 

426 

381 

45 

340 

6 

35 



683 

636 

47 

19 

10 

2 

159 

117 

42 



233 

226 

5 

2 

50 
34 
20 
14 

16 
14 

222 

175 
47 

16 



16 

2 

14 

131 

108 

23 



50 

47 

3 

37 
3 
7 



90,387 
87,398 
^2,989 

6,166 

3,497 

390 

22,813 

19,712 

3,054 

47 

37,438 

36,873 

447 

118 

6,577 
5,191 
3,624 
1,567 

1,369 
1,062 

17,393 
14,404 
^2,989 

1,091 

42 

33 

1,016 

216 

800 

8,793 

7,561 

^1,232 

5,564 

4,541 

4 257 

^284 



3,318 
356 
583 



646 

457 

^189 

361 

99 

^262 



431,426 
418,758 
^12,668 

33,669 

19,933 

2,130 

93,396 

79,473 

13,717 

206 

186,121 

183,486 

2,028 

607 

29,048 

22, 689 

16,138 

6,551 

6,290 
5,090 

89,192 

76,524 

^12,668 

3,802 
134 
130 

3,538 
680 

2,858 

44,526 
38,904 
^5,622 



28,216 

23,245 
22,157 

18,004 
1,664 
2,489 



2,675 

1.926 

^749 

1,782 

526 

^1,256 



■^242 
78 



^4,317 
^1,254 

272 



75,702 
72,795 
^2,907 

4,159 

2,987 

242 

20,047 

17,266 

2,737 

44- 

32,264 

31,747 

409 

108 

5,183 
3,940 
2,644 
1,296 

1,226 
967 

14,049 
11,142 
^2,907 

987 
39 
32 
916 
198 
718 

7,262 

6,030 

^1,232 

4,441 

3,665 

3,381 

^284 



2,617 
292 
472 



576 

387 

^189 

348 

86 

^262 

^704 

^239 

67 



130,121 

124,374 

5,747 

7,819 

5,610 

460 

30,867 

26,409 

4,395 

63 

52,239 

51,153 

827 

259 

10,095 
7,449 
4,960 
2,489 

2,613 
2,094 

29,101 

23,354 

5,747 

1,874 
70 
62 

1,742 
366 

1,376 

15,205 

12,741 

2,464 



9,464 

7,613 

7,045 

568 



5,628 
589 
828 



1,062 
683 
379 

705 
182 
523 

1,421 
475 
104 



336,614 

324,407 

12,207 

21,553 

16,174 

1,077 

79,425 

67,449 

11,780 

196 

150,420 

148,109 

1,805 

506 

20,138 

14,739 

9,662 

5,077 

5,332 
4,436 

65,078 
52,871 
12,207 

3,246 
120 
127 

2,999 
602 

2,397 

34,201 

28,579 

5,622 



20,848 

17,307 

16, 219 

l.C 



13,237 
1,314 
1,668 

2,331 

1,582 

749 

1,671 

415 

1,256 

3,559 

1,231 

186 



779,189 
733,341 
45,848 

51,903 

33,242 

8,104 

164,489 

142,198 

22,027 

264 

291,778 

286,384 

4,485 

909 

59,217 
45,906 
27,655 
18,251 

13,104 
11,168 

211,802 

165,954 

45,848 

6,002 
293 
288 

5,421 

1,221 
4,200 

113,940 
89,266 
24,674 

62,020 

56,811 

50,046 

6,765 

41,501 
3,580 
4,965 



6,622 
3,603 
3,019 

5,135 

709 

4,426 

9,525 

2,857 
514 



^527,744 

519,363 

^8,381 

34,063 
19,306 
10,352 

177,230 

160,948 

16,121 

161 

199,271 

195,519 

3,237 

515 

32,829 

25,299 

8,982 

16,317 

5,891 
5,106 

^84,351 
75,970 
^8,381 

2,001 

155 

78 

1,768 
266 

1,502 

^50,771 
46,505 
^4,266 



34,657 

2 21, 726 

21.070 

*656 



16,379 
2,400 
2,291 

^2,719 

2,120 

*599 

^1,460 

830 

^630 

^3,025 

^903 
180 



1,213,971 

1,160,015 

^53,956 

79,401 
46,851 
18,456 

325,128 

290,342 

34,463 

323 

457,632 

450,022 

6,324 

1,286 

76,709 
57,222 
33,902 
23,320 

17, 787 
15,239 

^275,101 
221,145 
^53,956 

7,614 
412 
357 
6,845 
1,392 
5,453 

^151,717 
122,777 
^28,940 

86,572 

^73,639 
66,218 
^7,421 

53,676 
5,851 
6,691 

^8,244 
4,626 
^3,618 

^6,372 

1,316 

^5,056 

^11,820 

^3,472 

546 



■^92,962 

92,689 

*273 

6,565 
5,697 



16,591 

12,804 

3,685 

102 

33,417 

31,881 

1,398 

138 

15,337 

13,983 

2,735 

11,248 

1,208 
1,035 

■^21,052 

20.779 

*273 

389 

36 

9 

344 
95 

249 

(MA) 

12,994 

(NA) 



10,105 



(NA) 

4,898 

(NA) 

4,204 
129 
565 



(NA) 

1,097 

(NA) 

(NA) 

223 

(NA) 

*730 
(NA) 
148 



124,321 

120,795 

^3,526 

7,417 

3,903 

(NA) 

37,462 

32,769 

4,556 

137 

51,219 
50,497 

I 722 



10,289 
7,707 
5,444 
2,263 

2,545 
1,092 

17,934 
14,408 
^3,526 

1,248 

55 

94 

1,099 

167 

932 

9,283 

7,663 

^1,620 

5,303 

(NA) 

4,389 

(NA) 

3,689 

■ 700 



1,032 

721 

^311 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

63 



=800,722 

=767, 158 

33,564 

=47,357 

28,512 

(NA) 

196,835 

167,090 

29,079 

666 

300,452 
294,970 

5,482 



73,780 
55,139 
20,314 
34,825 

18,469 
7,893 

182,298 

148,734 

33,564 

5,827 
298 
535 

4,994 
725 

4,269 

92,719 
92,719 



46,241 

(NA) 

53,224 

(NA) 

46,727 
6,497 



8,249 
5,165 
3,084 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
306 



MA Not available. 

•"■Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments excludes the cost of purchased 
machinery installed. 

■'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, -the number of production and 
development workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees or such operations, hence, the same 
figures are included for production and development workers and for all employees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes 
the estimated value of minerals produced and used in "the same establishment at such operations in making manufactured products. 

Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanaium Ores Industry. 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
Middle Atlantic 



71 



Tabic 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 



(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Code 



Industry group and industry 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Total 



Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 



De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 



Net shipments of primary products^ 



By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



($1,000) 



By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



10 

101 

106 

11 

1111 

1112 

12 

1211 

1213 

13 
1311 



138 
1381 



14 
1421 



1441 



All mi-neral industries. 



Metal mining 

Iron ores 

Ferroalloy ores. 



Anthracite mining 

Anthracite 

Anthracite stripping services. 



Bituminous coal mining 

Bituminous coal 

Coal stripping services, nee... 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 



Oil and gas field services... 
Drilling oil and gas wells. 



Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Crushed and broken stone 

Crushed and broken limestone. 

Sand and gravel 

Common sand and gravel 

Glass sand and Molding sand.. 



519,363 

34,063 
19,306 
10,352 

177,230 

160,948 

16,121 

199,271 

195,519 

3,237 

32,829 

25,299 

8,982 

16,317 

5,891 
5,106 

75,970 
46,505 
34,657 

21,070 

16,379 

4,691 



208,131 

17,829 

12,425 

1,195 

41,317 
29,937 
11,320 

79,827 

77,732 
1,738 

14,725 

10,779 

5,476 

5,303 

3,895 
3,319 

54,433 
34,434 
25,220 

14,161 

10,716 

3,445 



164,191 

(D) 

547 
(D) 

85,375 
85,375 



67,289 
67,289 



1,462 



(D 
137 
73 

162 
85 
77 



81,853 

(D) 

3,683 

(D) 

40,505 

39,319 

1,186 

20,000 

19,703 

258 

12,317 

11,941 

2,880 

9,061 

373 

315 

(D) 
3,400 
2,502 

1,511 

1,257 

254 



65,188 

2,840 
2,651 



10,033 
6,317 
3,615 

32,155 

30,795 

1,241 

4,325 

2,579 

626 

1,953 

1,623 
1,472 

15,835 
8,534 
6,862 

5,236 

4,321 

915 



92,689 



6,565 
5,697 



16,591 

12,804 

3,685 

33,417 

31,881 

1,398 

15,337 

13,983 

2,735 

11,248 

1,208 
1,035 

20,779 
12,994 
10,105 

4,898 

4,204 

694 



17,483 

(D) 
2,711 



3,818 
3,818 



1,885 
1,885 



7,490 
7,371 
1,043 
6,328 

119 
117 

(D) 
837 
744 

199 

183 

16 



75,206 

(D) 
2,986 



12,773 
8,986 
3,685 

31, 532 

29,996 

1,398 

7,847 
6,612 
1,692 
4,920 

1,089 
918 

(D) 

12,157 

9,361 

4,699 

4,021 

678 



XXX 

(D) 

XXX 
XXX 

22,341 

XXX 
XXX 

69,537 

XXX 

XXX 
XXX 

*8,121 
=79,892 

XXX 
XXX 

XXX 

58,281 
44,420 

46,501 

42,512 

(NA) 



XXX 

(D) 

XXX 
XXX 

196,425 
^33,305 

XXX 

380,078 
^6,176 

XXX 

56,687 
33,136 
22,957 

XXX 

^13,271 

XXX 

113,774 
78,785 

■^70,900 
'59,058 
'11,842 



XXX 

(D) 

XXX 



XXX 

80 

XXX 



XXX 

*50 
=4,535 

XXX 
XXX 

XXX 

*19,541 
^18,911 

^5,867 

^5,976 

(NA) 



XXX 

(D) 

XXX 



XXX 

296 
C) 

XXX 

818 

198 

1,214 

XXX 

(') 

XXX 

^33,518 
^33,183 

n 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

■"■Represents gross shipmen-ts of -the mineral indicated by "the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from o^ther establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during ■the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

■'Figures for primary ser-vices performed in o-ther indus-tries are included ■with those for primary services performed in "the specified industry. 

*Represent thousands of barrels of crude petroleum, field condensate, and drips shipped or used. 

'Represen-ts millions of cubic feet of natural gas shipped. 

^Includes minerals produced and used in -the same establishment in mating manufactured products. The value of such minerals was estimated. 

'Figures for ■the value of primary products sMpped in 0"ther indus-tries or subindus-tries are included wl^th -those for "the value of primary products 
shipped in the specified indus-try. See also footnote 6. 



72 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
Middle Atlantic 



Table IC— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind 
code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Total 



Mijilng only 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods -"^ 



Mines with preparation plants 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 


Nonpro 


rately 


duoing 


oper- 


estab- 


ated 


lish- 


prepa- 


ments 


ration 




plants 





10 



1011 



106 



1111 



1211 



14 



U21 



All establishments: 
Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Metal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Iron ores: 

Number of establish- 
ments 

Niimber of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Ferroalloy ores: 

Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Anthracite mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Bituminous coal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Oil and gas extraction: 

Number of establishments 

Number of e mployees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Nonmetallic minerals mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 



Crushed and broken stone: 

Nioraber of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Crushed and broken 
limestone: 
Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining 



,000. 



144-1 Sand and gravel: 

Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

See footnotes at end of table. 



4,158 
^82,255 

^291,002 



22 
^6,010 

*50,649 



12 
3,497 

33,242 



■ 4 
390 

8,104 



1,163 
19,712 

142,198 



1,312 
36,873 

286,384 



877 
5,208 

46,113 



784 
^14,370 

165,658 



253 
^7,561 

89,266 



178 
5,564 

62,020 



381 
^4,257 

50,046 



4,096 
■^80,256 

■^691,138 



21 
(D) 

(D) 



12 
3,497 

33,242 



4 
390 

8,104 



1,154 
19,703 

142,348 



1,303 
36,786 

286,025 



845 
5,106 

46,507 



773 
(D) 

(D) 



250 
7,472 

89,266 



177 
(D) 

(D) 



378 
4,181 

50,062 



2,935 
23,614 

197,574 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



966 
7,301 

60,696 



914 
10,311 

81,626 



5,<: 

46,300 



216 
(D) 

(D) 



9 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



108 
(D) 

(D) 



1,430 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 



(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



829 
5,505 

33,962 



589 
8,246 

59,296 



11 
143 



870 



536 
3,393 

44,074 



77 
954 

18,320 



1,746 
19,092 



171 
693 

6,662 



9 
(D) 



(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



76 
231 



2,657 



969 
(D) 

(D) 



60 
842 



8,414 



37 
319 

3,238 



838 
5,089 

46,300 



34 
(D) 

(D) 



32 
(D) 

(D) 



1,013 
(D) 

(D) 



14 
(D) 

(D) 



9 
(D) 

(D) 



91 
10,019 

63,758 



356 
25,854 

198,361 



552 
12,593 



152,423 



240 
(D) 

(D) 



168 
5,438 

60,990 



267 
3,677 

42,417 



214 
(D) 

(D) 



10 
3,174 

22,618 



2,382 
19,182 



673 

15,700 

176,133 



(D) 
(D) 



17 
573 



3,196 



178 
21,026 

157,933 



9 
(D) 

(D) 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



11 
752 

4,786 



149 
3,100 

28,204 



511 
(D) 

(D) 



235 
7,124 

86,544 



163 
5,216 



59,323 



237 
3,003 



34,840 



126 
11,589 

78,002 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



63 
8,694 



29 
1,728 

12,224 



32 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



30 
674 

7,577 



148 
(D) 

(D) 



6 
(D) 

(D) 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



390 
8,104 



97 
2,383 

17,894 



33 
621 

6,038 



207 



5 
270 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
Middle Atlantic 



73 



Table 2C.-Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries 
Except .Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958-Continued 

^f"""" explnnation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Nonmetallic minerals mining — Con. 
Sand and gravel — Con. 
Common sand and gravel: 
Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Glass sand: 

Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Molding sand: 

Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 



Producing establishments 



Total 



340 
3,318 



41,501 



6 
356 

3,580 



35 
^583 

4,965 



337 
3,303 

41,517 



6 

356 



3,580 



Mining only 



Total 



35 
583 



4,965 



102 
(D) 

(D) 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



6 
(D) 

(D) 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



70 
(D) 

(D) 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods ■" 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



6 
(D) 

(D) 



32 
(D) 

(D) 



Ifndcr- 

nroiind 

mines 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



233 
2,858 

34,782 



5 
(D) 



(D) 



29 
(D) 

(D) 



203 
2,184 

27,205 



(D) 
(D) 



29 
(D) 

(D)| 



30 
674 

7,577 



Sepa- 
rately 
oper- 
ated 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 



Nonp ro- 
duclng 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



3 

15 

( = ) 



min^ViT^^t Z^^S1^'''°^^ Z^Toi^^^^TZr^lU esiL'^nfl 'V\'T ^' '''''' establishments for which the method of 
includes, but detail by type of operation excludes sZl Zt^ZZf' f ^^^^^^^fnt^ f°^ "hich the method of raining was not specified. ^Total 

lishments" and "Metal ^nSg", see aLo "o^toote"' 4ZZes allTorollU.T"-'' ='"'""' °'"=^^ "^^ ''"-'''' facilities. For "All estab- 

cost of supplies, purchases for resale, purchased iuels and elecLicUv con?^act wL^"^!!? services operation in New Jersey. =Not shown since the 

ueii. ana electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded capital expenditures. 



Table 3. -General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, by Counties: 1958 and 1954 



(For county statistics, see table J of the individual State Reports) 



Table 4.-Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group: 1958 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 
106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 Metal mining services 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 

110 Anthracite 

lie Anthractle mining services 

120 Bituminous coal 



12C Coal mining services, nee 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

141 Dimension stone 

141M Dimension stone in manufactures 

142 Crushed and broken stone 

142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 
144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel in manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonmetallic minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.o. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c., In 

manufactures 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


Division and size 
class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied In 
mineral 
indus- 
tries 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


106 


108 


109 


110 


lie 


120 


12C 


131 


132 


138 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 

M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148 


149 


149 
M 


Middle Atlantic 

No employees 


4,750 
810 

2,041 
681 
535 
410 

111 
98 
38 
20 

6 


4,500 
800 

1,912 
642 
510 
378 

97 
97 
38 
20 

6 


250 
10 

129 
39 
25 
32 

14 

1 


12 




4 


4 


3 


2 


ip£3 
473 
343 
139 
91 
59 

19 

25 

8 

2 

4 


85 
1 
16 
15 
11 
27 

7 
6 
2 


1,312 
123 
553 
218 
192 
126 

28 
37 
19 
15 

1 


61 
1 
25 
12 
16 
6 

1 


870 

139 

589 

79 

29 

21 

6 
5 
1 

1 


7 
1 
3 
3 


188 
12 

122 

30 

8 

11 

4 

1 


60 

10 

35 

6 

7 

2 


48 

'22 
5 
7 
8 

6 


253 
4 
34 
33 
74 
75 

23 
8 
2 


47 
1 
9 
7 
7 

18 

4 

1 


381 
32 

149 
87 
66 
37 

5 
5 


45 

'33 

5 
4 

1 

2 


59 

4 

24 

14 

8 

7 

2 


106 

9 

65 

21 

7 

4 


5 

"2 

1 


5 

2 
2 

"1 


26 

15 
3 
3 
2 


4 


1-4 employees 










1 

1 
1 


1 
"l 




5-9 employees 

10-19 employees . . . 
20-49 employees... 

50-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 
250^99 employees. 
500-999 employees. 
• 1,000-2,499 

employees 


2 
2 

1 
1 
3 
2 

1 




1 
2 

1 


1 
1 
1 

"i 


1 
1 
2 


... 


1 

1 


... 


3 




































































' 

































EAST NORTH CENTRAL 



75 



76 






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O) 








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z 


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o 


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GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
East North Central 
Tabic I— General Statistics for Mineral Operations: 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction. For all yeara prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 



77 



Kind of operation 
and year 



Establish- 
ments, 
number 



To- 
tal 



20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Man- 
hours 

a,ooo) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added 

In 

mining 



($1,000) 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
in- 
stalled 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ^ 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



Energy used 

(kwh 
equivalent) 



(mil- 
lion) 



Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 



Mineral industries 
only: 

1958 

195^ 



Including operations 
in manufactures: 
All operations: 

1958 

1954' 

1939* 

1919^ 

1909^ 

1902^° 

Excluding oil and 
gas extraction 
industries: 

1958 

1954' 

1939^3 

1929^* 

1919^5 

1909^' 

1902^5 



4,313 
4,636 



4,662 
4,912 
'3,989 
3,788 
4,406 
17,212 



2,730 
2,893 
'2,762 
2,044 
2,082 
2,229 
73,309 



659 

691 



712 
743 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



566 

787 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



74,732 
81,411 



78,967 
86,251 
107,980 
203,031 
199,595 
135,637 



62,647 
68,259 
89,527 
127,970 
192,969 
187,002 
127,130 



385,398 
349.426 



404,040 
367,576 
142,184 
265,590 
128,779 
89,819 



329,867 
296,206 
113,482 
179,352 
252,484 
120,517 
83,387 



60,937 
69,142 



64,974 

73,815 

98,084 

190,533 

191,328 

^^127,904 



52,433 
59,710 
82,867 
120,944 
182,255 
180,831 
"^0,785 



114,357 
131,846 



122,056 

141,163 

161,491 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



99,202 
114,765 
134,366 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



292,921 
280,043 



310,336 
297,258 
119,026 
238,335 
119,249 
82,089 



260,422 
246,326 

97,367 
161,662 
228,238 
112,650 

77,097 



936,363 
813,435 



994,314 
853,641 
316,939 
391,930 
189,479 
142,014 



688,790 
591,672 
190,268 
285,717 
328,041 
157,369 
118,905 



245,385 
198,264 



^256, 869 
^207, 177 
56,604 
80,229 
36,089 
26, 30; 



^=262, 110 
^^214, 597 
49,603 
64,052 
71,987 
27,333 
17,496 



130,043 
=60,623 



130,069 

=60,659 

(NA) 

3,320 

5,657 

(NA) 



(12) 

(") 
(NA) 
(NA) 
84 
245 
(NA) 



66,048 
81,106 



^66,267 

^81,202 

28,744 

5,004 

6,308 

5,009 



^25,329 
^25,657 

1,173 
693 

1,019 
84^ 
203 



73,860 
99,520 



*74,453 
*1£IO,208 
(NA.) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



-^53,938 
*67,512 
(NA) 
15,990 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,324,808 
1,094,500 



1,394,462 
1,143,779 
402,287 
480,483 
237,533 
173,327 



126,891 
158,448 



■^127,5101 
*L59,108 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



18,184 
16,318 



298 

236 



''18,317 


282 


*16,597 


225 


18,071 


184 


'47,956 


252 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 



949,247 
809,638 
241, OW 
350,462 
401,131 
185,791 
136,604 



^80,920 
■^89,800 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



■^11,208 

*10,156 

14,595 

24,451 

545, 464 

(NA) 

(NA) 



214 
170 
176 
202 
249 
(NA) 
(NA) 



NA Not available. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of shipnents (or production for 1919 and 
1909) and contains sane duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals frcni one establishment to another for preparation. The approximate 
magnitude of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other years, represents net pro- 
duction and excludes this duplication. For years prior to 1958, excludes the value of residue gas fran natural gas liquids plants, 

^Excludes the cost of natural gas processed at natural gas liquids plants, but includes the estimated value prior to processing of natural gas 
liquids contained in such gas. 

■'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is 
included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and piirchased fuels and electricity. 

^Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments and, in 1958, 
for dimension stone mining operations in manufactures in Michigan. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Except, in part, for value of shipnents and value added in mining, excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction 
with quarries. 

'^Represents number of mines and quarries, number of natural gas liquids plants, and for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services 
industries, number of operating ccmpanies. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel operations and for stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime plants. In 1929, there were 297 such 
sand and gravel establishments, with products valued at $26,686 thousand, and 31 such stone operations (the value of products of 29 of these stone 
operations was $4,612 thousand). See also footnote 14. 

'Excludes purchased electricity. For "All operations" in 1939, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to only 3 percent of the total kwh 
equivalent of energy used; and for "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries" in 1929, also to only 3 percent. 

^°Includes data for lime plants producing lime valued at $2,637 thousand and for 2 cement plants. Excludes data for sand and gravel and clay 
mining operations and stone quarries at 33 cement plants which produced cement valued at $4,904 thousand. 

^■"■Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 

■"•^The cost of minerals received for preparation is included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 
^■'Excludes data for 6 nonproducing establishments. See also footnote 6. 

■"•^Excludes data for cranmon clay and shale operations. In 1939, there were 159 such mines with products valued at $2,137 thousand. 
^'Except for number of establishments, includes data for one oil and gas extraction operation in Michigan. Also, includes for 1919 data for 5 
nonproducing oil and gas extraction operations in Ohio, and for 7 such operations in 1909. For 1919 and 1909, see also footnote 8. For 1902, see 
also footnote 10. 



78 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
East North Central 



Table 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Industry group and industry 



Total 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 



(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



tl,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added in 

mining 



tl,000) 



10 

102 
103 

12 

1211 
1213 
1214 

13 
1311 



138 
1381 



U21 



1441 



145 



1453 



1459 

147 

1473 
14S 



All mineral operations 

Mineral Industries 

Included in manufactures... 

Metal mining 

Copper, lead, and zinc 
ores 

Bituminous coal mining 

Bituminous coal 

Coal stripping services, nee... 
Coal mining services, nee 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 

Oil and gas field services : 
Drilling oil and gas wells . . . 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures . . . 

Dimension stone 

Dimension limestone 

Mineral subindustry 

Included in manufactures , . . 

Dimension granite 

Dimension stone , nee 

Mineral sutindustry 

Included in manufactures . . . 

Crushed and broken stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures . . . 

Crushed and broken limestone 
(mineral subindustry only) . . 

Crushed and broken granite 
(mineral subindustiy) 

Crushed and broken stone, nee 
(mineral subindustry only) . . 

Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures . . . 
Common sand and gravel 
(mineral subindustry only) . . 

Glass sand 

Molding sand 

Clay and related minerals 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures . . . 

Fire clay 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures . . . 

Clay and related minerals, 
nee 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures . . . 

Chemical and fertilizer 
minerals : 
Flourspar 

Nonmetallic minerals senrices . . 



4,662 

4,313 
349 

59 



20 

626 
612 

14 

1,932 

1,388 

1,281 

107 



369 

2,045 

1,696 

349 

96 
51 
29 
22 



34 

25 

9 

508 

472 

36 

429 



36 

1,116 

1,043 

73 

990 

6 

47 

251 

53 

198 

101 
33 
68 



150 

20 

130 



712 

659 

53 

41 

10 

202 
201 



156 

98 

96 

2 

42 

313 

260 

53 

25 

18 

6 

12 

3 

4 
1 
3 

137 

119 
18 

111 

1 



116 

112 

4 

103 
3 
6 

19 

10 
9 

11 
5 
6 



78,967 
74,732 
^4,235 

10,026 

2,807 

25,301 
25,201 

100 

16,320 

11,318 

10,685 

633 

3,719 

27,320 
23,085 
^4,235 

2,573 

1,940 

377 

1,563 

153 

480 
134 
346 

10,994 

10,066 

^928 

9,111 
90 

865 

10,042 

9,700 

^342 

8,887 
368 
445 

1,317 

512 

^805 

650 

282 

^368 



667 

230 
^437 



^830 
71 



404,040 
385,398 
^18,642 

52,693 

12,169 

143,411 
142,949 

462 

74,173 

54,896 

52,058 

2,838 

14,225 

133,763 
115,121 
^18,642 

10,446 
8,416 
1,593 
6,823 

461 

1,569 

429 

1,140 

55,075 
50,539 
^4,536 

46,699 
261 

3,579 

48,445 
46,998 
^1,447 

42,884 
2,032 
2,082 

6,091 

2,422 

^3,669 

3,092 

1,359 

^1,733 

2,999 

1,063 

^1,936 



^3,713 
323 



64,974 
60,937 
^4,037 

8,097 



2,252 

21,651 
21,563 



12,541 

8,043 

7,567 

476 

3,342 

22,685 
18,648 
^4,037 

2,309 

1,736 

330 

1,406 

132 

441 
123 
318 

9,336 

, 8,408 

^928 

7,586 
73 

749 

8,292 

7,950 

^342 

7,299 
298 
353 

1,240 
435 
^805 

599 

231 

^368 

641 

204 

^437 



691 
65 



122,056 

114,357 

7,699 

14,008 

4,699 

38,322 
38,142 

180 

22,854 
14, 569 

13,709 
860 

6,046 

46,872 

39,173 

7,699 

4,146 

3,148 

621 

2,527 

225 

773 
219 
554 

19,817 

17,961 

1,856 

16,418 
99 

1,4/4 

17,404 

16,719 

685 

15,373 
644 
702 

2,505 

894 

1,611 

1,157 
421 
736 

1,348 
473 
875 



1,344 
144 



310,336 

292,921 

17,415 

40,867 

10,638 

116,869 
116,442 

427 

49,914 

32,985 

30,968 

2,017 

12,367 

102,686 
85,271 
17,415 

8,751 
6,990 
1,204 
5,786 

386 

1,375 
383 
992 

43,529 

38,993 

4,536 

35,863 
201 

2,929 

38,037 

36,590 

1,447 

33,601 
1,472 
1,517 

5,571 
1,902 
3,669 

2,726 

993 

1,733 

2,845 

909 

1,936 



2,772 
267 



994,314 

936,363 

57,951 

87,682 

17,664 

284,145 
283,283 

862 

305,524 

256,394 

251,417 

4,977 

27,270 

316,963 

259,012 

57,951 

15,947 

12,508 

2,754 

9,754 

718 

2,721 

904 

1,817 

134,929 

114,249 

20,680 

106,410 
482 

7,357 

127,460 

116,602 

10,858 

105,397 
6,018 
5,187 

15,634 
5,712 
9,922 

7,428 
3,866 
3,562 

8,206 
1,846 
6,360 



6,590 
632 



^527, 658 
515,336 
^12,322 

58,541 

22,229 

159,818 
159,185 

633 

186,281 

94,850 

90,083 

4,767 

17,152 

^123, 018 
110,696 
*12,322 

4,753 

3,558 

582 

2,976 

253 

942 
258 
684 

^56,512 
52,335 
^4,177 

48,292 
383 

3,660 

=47,102 

46,396 

^706 

41,545 
2,960 
1,891 

=6,516 

3,537 

=2,979 

=2,793 

1,349 

=1,444 



^3,723 

2,188 

^1,535 



^1,394/462 

1,324,808 

3 69, 654 

128,274 

37,899 

414,498 
413,049 

1,449 

445,215 

308,553 

301,937 

6,616 



4,012 
486 



*127,510 

126,891 

^ '619 

17,949 

1,994 

29,465 
29,419 

46 

46,590 

42,691 

39,563 

3,128 



40,836 

^406,475 
336,821 
^69,654 

19,707 

15,356 

3,053 

12,303 

932 

3,419 
1,108 
2,311 

^176,319 
151,462 
^24,857 

140,710 
676 

10,076 

^160,105 
14S,541 
^11,564 

133,829 
7,973 
6,739 

^20,918 

8,017 

^12,901 

^9,732 
4,776 
^5,006 

^11,136 

3,241 

^7,895 



9,627 
1,016 



3,586 

^33,5061 
32,887 
'• *619 

993 
710 
283 
427 

39 

244 

54 

190 

(NA) 

15,122 

(NA) 



13,992 
189 

941 

(NA) 

14,457 

(NA) 

13,113 

1,005 

339 

(NA) 

1,232 

(NA) 

(NA) 
439 
(NA) 

(HA) 
793 
(NA) 



975 
102 



86,251 
81,411 
^4,840 

12,506 



(NA) 

30,902 
30,832 

70 

17,992 

12,380 

11,659 

721 



3,962 

24,851 
20,011 
^4,840 

4,208 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

12,816 

■2 12,816 



8,730 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
8,245 

(NA) 

7,741 
504 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

687 

87 

^600 



682 
73 



853,641 

813,435 

40,206 

35,935 



(NA) 

259,486 
258,913 

573 

261,969 

207,760 

200,438 

7,322 



36,191 

246,253 

206,047 

40,206 

18,551 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

110,453 

110,453 



83,926 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

83,604 

(NA) 

73,793 
4,806 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

6,046 

753 

5,293 



5,426 
554 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. NA Not available. ^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in 
manufacturing establishments. =For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, 
excludes the cost of purchased machinery installed. ■'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manu- 
facturing establishments, the number of production and development workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained 
on other employees at such operations, hence, the same figures are included for production and development workers and for all employees at such 
operations. For value of shipments and receipts includes the estimated value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment at such 
operations. ''Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 
^Includes figures for employees at separately reported central offices and related facilities in Missouri. ^Excludes data for dimension stone 
mining operations in manufactures in Michigan. 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
East North Central 



79 



Tabic 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group and industry 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Total 



Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 



De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
ecjuip- 
ment^ 



Net shipments of primary products^ 



By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



10 

102 

103 

12 
1211 

13 
1311 



138 
1381 



U21 



1441 



U5 
1473 



All mineral industries. 



Metal mining 

r Copper, lead, and zinc ores. 



Bituminous coal mining. 
Bituminous coal 



Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 

Oil and gas field services: 
Drilling oil and gas wells 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Crushed and broken stone 

Crushed and broken limestone. 
Crxished and broken stone, nee 



Sand and gravel 

Common sand and gravel. 

Glass sand 

Molding sand 



Clay and related minerals. 
Fluorspar 



515,336 

58,541 
22,229 

159,818 
159,185 

186,281 

94,850 

90,083 

4,767 



17,152 

110,696 

52,335 

48,292 

3,660 

46,396 

41, 545 

2,960 

1,891 

3,537 
4,012 



245,385 

^44,207 
^20,401 



85,042 
84,608 

'124,861 

38,206 

36,341 

1,865 



12,770 

'81,231 

39,407 

36,691 

2,507 

31,769 

28,007 

2,421 

1,341 

2,331 
'3,052 



130,043 

(') 
(') 

40,087 
40,087 

(') 

XXX 
XXX 
XXX 



(') 



152 
152 



150 
(') 



66,048 

10,732 
1,202 

6,544 
6,413 

40,905 

39,009 

36,819 

2,190 



1,756 

7,867 

2,370 

2,153 

216 

4,404 

4,113 

110 

181 

377 
527 



73,860 

3,602 
626 

28,145 
28,077 

20,515 

17,635 

16,923 

712 



2,626 

21,598 

9,670 

8,560 

937 

10,071 

9,273 

429 

369 

679 

433 



17,949 
1,994 

29,465 
29,419 

46,590 

42,691 

39,563 

3,128 

3,586 

32,887 

15,122 

13,992 

941 

14,457 

13,113 

1,005 

339 

1,232 
975 



25,786 

4,832 
398 

1,629 
1,629 

18,205 

17,365 

15,960 

1,405 

840 

1,120 

421 

405 

11 

276 
270 



11 
391 



101,105 

13,117 
1,596 

27,836 
27,790 

28,385 

25,326 

23,603 

1,723 



2,746 

31,767 

14,701 

13,587 

930 

14,181 

12,843 

1,005 

333 

1,221 
584 



■^7,018 



XXX 

93,288 

XXX 
XXX 

^98,634 
^24,052 



XXX 

104,242 

99,683 

3,015 

131,027 

125,063 

1,363 

2,904 

XXX 

150 



XXX 

(D) 

XXX 

373,169 

XXX 

304,189 

293,743 

6,102 



'39,356 

XXX 

142,040 

132,541 

8,403 

' *148p07 

'' 8136^03 

'5,189 

'7,615 

XXX 

7,675 



XXX 

(NA) 



XXX 

50 

XXX 
XXX 

'1,323 
^21,213 



XXX 

8 17, 765 

'17,687 

(NA) 

89, 283 

^9,909 

434 

637 

XXX 

(10) 



XXX 
XXX 



XXX 

139 



XXX 

3,451 
3,681 
4,114 



C) 

XXX 

^25,244 

^20,182 

(NA) 

(') 
(') 
C) 
C) 

XXX 

5 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

^Represents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

^The cost of minej-als received for preparation are included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

^Represents crude ore mined in the specified industries. 

'Represents thousands of barrels of crude petroleum, field condensate, and drips shipped or used. 

^Represents millions of cubic feet of natural gas shipped. 

'Figures for pririiary products or services produced or performed in other industries are included with those for primary products or services 
produced or performed in the specified industry. 

'includes minerals produced and used in the same establishment in making manufactured products. The value of such minerals was estimated. 

'includes less than 40,000 tons of stone, other than limestone, used in the manufacture of cement. See also footnote 8. 
^°Less than 500 tons. 



80 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
East North Central 



Table 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
Code 



Industry group or industi-y 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Total 



Mining only 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 



Combtna- 

tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods-' 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 


Nonpro 


rately 


d uc ing 


oper- 


estab- 


ated 


lish- 


prepa- 


ments 


ration 




plants 





10 



102 & 
103 



12 



132 



U 



U2 



All establishments : 

Number of establishments 

Nxmiber of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Metal Mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

> Copper, lead, and zinc ores : 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining .....$1,000. 

Bituminous coal mining: 

Number of establishments , 

Number of employees , 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. , 

Oil and gas extraction: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Crude petroleum and natural gas ; 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
raining $1_, 000. , 

Natural gas liquids: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Nonmetallic minerals mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining. .$1,000. . 



Crushed and broken stone : 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. , 

Crushed and broken limestone: 
Number of establishments.... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. , 

Crushed and broken stone, nee; 
Number of establishments . . . . 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000.. 



See "footnotes at end of table. 



3,751 
^69,645 

899,223 



57 
(D) 

(D) 



20 
2,807 

17,664 



612 
25,201 

283,283 



1,397 
(D) 

(D) 



1,388 
11,318 

256,394 



9 
(D) 

(D) 



1,685 
23,014 

258,380 



472 
10,066 

114,249 



429 
9,111 

106,410 



36 
865 

7,357 



3,644 
69,387 

899,975 



44 
(D) 

(D) 



13 
2,781 

17,708 



604 
25,164 

283,593 



1,335 
(D) 

(D) 



1,326 
11,271 

257,484 



9 
(D) 

(D) 



1,661 
22,938 

258,466 



469 
10,052 

114,275 



426 
9,097 

106,436 



36 
865 

7,357 



1,989 
24,189 

398,929 



30 
(D) 

(D) 



6 
(D) 

(D) 



316 
4,000 

53,268 



1,326 
11,271 

257,484 



1,326 
11,271 

257,484 



317 
(D) 

(D) 



298 



6 
(D) 

(D) 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



200 
8,822 



82,002 



28 
6,924 

67,654 



6 
(D) 

(D) 



158 
*1, 816 

^13,512 



14 
80 

1,031 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



364 
3,492 

50,154 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



138 
1,807 

33,496 



224 
(D) 

(D) 



6 
(D) 

(D) 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



1,425 
11,875 

266,773 



20 
*377 

*6,260 



1,326 
11,271 

257,484 



1,326 

11,271 

257,484 



79 
(D) 

(D)i 



1,615 
43,838 

481,723 



7 
(D) 

(D) 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



274 
''20,713 

'228,206 



1,334 
20,770 

235,381 



450 
9,957 

113,366 



413 
(D) 



(D) 



31 
(D) 

(D) 



134 
(D) 

(D) 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



117 
'12,788 

'109,525 



1,348 
*25,412 

■^18,483 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



137 
6,810 

106,224 



13 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



5 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1,208 
17,544 

198,908 



444 
(D) 

(D) 



408 
8,219 

96,687 



30 
841 

7,214 



133 
(D) 

(D) 



20 
1,115 

12,457 



113 
(D) 

(D) 



40 
1,360 

19,323 



7 
438 



538 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



14 
'451 

'2,119 



9 
(D) 

(D) 



9 
(D) 

(D) 



10 
(D) 

(D) 



7 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



107 
238 



13 
108 



734 



7 
26 

(') 



37 

( = ) 



62 

47 

( = ) 



62 
47 

( = )' 



24 
76 

( = ) 



3 

14 



3 

14 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
East North Central 



Kl 



Table 2C,— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958— Continued 

(For expltmation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
Code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Mining only 



Total 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods^ 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 


Nonpro 


rately 


duclng 


oper- 


estab- 


ated 


lish- 


prepa- 


ments 


ration 




plants 





lUl 



l-iVS 



Nonmetallio minerals mining — Con. 

Sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Clay and related minerals : 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Fluorspar : 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 



1,043 
9,700 

116,602 



53 
512 

5,712 



25 
(D) 



1,032 
(D) 

(D) 



53 
512 

5,712 



19 
(D) 

6,617 



205 
(D) 

(D) 



35 
IAS 

1,617 



778 



5 
(D) 

(D) 



673 



132 
(D) 

(D) 



29 
127 

1,349 



105 



73 
161 



2,£ 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



827 
(D) 

(D) 



18 
364 

4,095 



(D) 
(D) 



6 

713 

5,645 



729 
(D) 

(D) 



18 
364 

4,095 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



11 
(D) 

(D) 



6 

12 

( = ) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

^Includes data for 80 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
includes data for 42 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 

^Includes figures for separately reported central offices and related facilities which were not distributed by type of operation. 

*Figures for 2 underground stone quarries are included with those for open-pit mines. 

'Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeds capital 
expenditures . 

^Figures for one mine with other methods in Illinois are included with those for underground mines. 

''Figures for 4 separately operated preparation plants in Indiana and Illinois are included with those for underground mines with preparation 
plants . 



Table 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, by Counties: 1958 and 1954 

(For county statistics, see table 5 of the individual State Reports) 



82 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
East North Central 
Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group: 1958 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Gold and silver ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 Metal mining services 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 
120 Bituminous coal 



12C Coal mining services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

141 Dimension stone 

141M Dimension stone in manufactures 

142 Crushed and broken stone 

142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 
144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel in manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonmetallic minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c, 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c, in 

manufactures 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


Division and size 
class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied In 
mineral 
indus- 
tries 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108 


109 


120 


12C 


131 


132 


138 


141 


141 

M 


142 


142 
M 


lAA 


14^ 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148 


149 


149 
M 


East North 
Central, total 

No employees 

1-4 employees 

5-9 employees 

10-19 employees . . . 

20-49 employees . . . 
50-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 

250-499 employees. 
500-999 employees. 
1000 employees 


4,662 

462 

2,077 

723 

688 

449 
118 
104 

27 
12 

2 


4,313 

432 

1,894 

677 

651 

414 

108 

97 

27 

11 

2 


349 

30 

183 

46 

37 

35 

10 

7 

1 


36 

1 
4 
1 

1 

6 

4 

12 

4 
2 

1 


6 


14 








2 


1 


612 

40 
170 

99 
102 

94 
38 
49 

15 
5 


14 

3 
6 
3 

1 

1 


1,388 

208 

848 

140 

94 

71 

14 

8 

3 

2 


9 

2 

1 
1 

5 


535 

24 
241 
111 
106 

4a 

12 

1 


61 

7 

29 

8 

9 

7 

1 


35 

7 
6 
5 

6 
4 
6 


472 

43 

111 

71 

128 

83 
21 
11 

3 

1 


36 

1 
6 
4 
7 

12 
5 

1 


1,043 

92 
434 
214 
191 

93 

11 

8 


73 

6 

45 

10 

8 

4 


53 

8 

20 

8 

7 

8 
2 


198 

23 

125 
26 
15 

9 


26 

3 
5 
8 
3 

1 
2 
2 

2 


11 

5 

4 
2 


30 

3 

14 

6 

3 

2 

1 
1 


7 


1 

1 
2 


5 

3 

1 

2 
2 

1 


































1 


2 








1 


4 
1 








1 






1 
1 














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... 


... 


1 










































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• • • 


■ ■ • 


• • • 


• • • 


• ■ • 


* * 

































WEST NORTH CENTRAL 



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GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
West North Central 



85 



Tabic 1.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations; 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction. For all years prior to 1939, oxclvides contract service operation;:) 



Kind of operation 
and year 



Establish- 
ments, 
number 



To- 
tal 



or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 

:$i,ooo) 



Value 

added 

In 

mining 



($1,000) 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
in- 
stalled 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts -^ 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



Energy used 

(k«h 
equivalent) 



(mil- 
lion) 



Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 



Mineral industries 
only: 

1958 

195-; 



Including operations 
in manufactures: 
All operations: 

1958 

195-;' 

1939' 

1919' 

1909' 

1902^^ 

Excluding oil and 
gas extraction 
industries: 

1958 

195<;* 

1939^* 

1929^= 

1919^* 

1909^-'' 

1902^^ 



3,221 
3,320 



3,384 
3,435 
'2,242 
1,754 
2,477 
'2,596 



1,712 
1,845 
1,466 
1,248 
1,130 



452 
470 



484 
499 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



291 

287 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



2,24^ (NA) 
(NA) 



"2,513 



50,928 
51,567 



53,600 
54,163 
44,826 
67, 460 
79,460 
52,264 



36,654 
37,132 
34,243 
45,876 
59,962 
78,170 
51,940 



253,055 
213,366 



264,617 
223,255 
59,270 
94,934 
55,403 
35,266 



184,164 
152, 819 
43,198 
65,321 
83,107 
54, 582 
35,028 



38,591 
43,170 



41,081 
45,589 
39,593 
62,654 
75,759 
^8,608 



27,960 
31,421 
30,892 
42,4^3 
56,346 
74, 734 
^48,361 



76,427 
86,965 



81,570 

92,437 

70, 332 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



55,409 
64,145 
56,303 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



174,836 
167,642 



184,952 
176, 690 
46, 611 
84, 892 
50,988 
32,002 



128,408 
121,344 
35,234 
56, 823 
75,268 
50,472 
31,827 



918, 673 
^785,763 



956,496 
^813, 247 
213,735 
204, 842 
104,283 
62,312 



507, 849 

(NA) 

156,333 

196, 723 

173,976 

99,019 

61, 863 



225,172 
174,159 



*235,115 
*182,462 
26,298 
68,217 
21, 103 
10,436 



^70,529 
(NA) 
21,441 
33,411 
34,808 
20,244 
9,972 



93,109 
'10,280 



*93,109 
^1,252 

(NA) 

299 

1,920 

(NA) 



106,159 
130, 828 



'*106,4A5 

*L31,039 

12,936 

6,754 

2,948 

895 



69,131 1,267,166 
104,617^,006,491 



145,078 
199,102 



=69,326 
'104, 929 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,315,218 

^1, 043, 418 

252,969 

280,112 

130,254 

73,643 



^145, 273 
^199, 457 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



23,645 
18,755 



= 23,715 

= 18,697 

7,324 

^°16,955 

(NA) 
(NA) 



613 
434 



577 
410 
185 
271 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(") 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
12 
1,650 
(NA) 



*18,650 

^36,949 

523 

1,884 

2,801 

2,648 

679 



=26,987 
=42,030 
(NA) 
6,373 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



680,490 
^572, 243 
178,297 
232,018 
211,597 
123,561 
72,514 



=43,525 
=80,490 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



=13,260 


473 


=6,492 


207 


3,921 


127 


8,284 


195 


1^3,368 


237 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 



KA Not available. 

For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment. For 1958, 1954, 1919,and 1909, represents gross value of shipments (or production for 1919 and 
1909) and contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to anolier for preparation. The approximate magnitude 
of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other years, represents net production and 
excludes this duplication. For years prior to 1958, excludes the value of residue gas from natural gas liquids plants. 

^Excludes the cost of natural gas processed at natural gas liquids plants, but includes the estimated value prior to processing of natural gas 
liquids contained in such gas. See also footnote 2. 

^icludes data for natural gas processed at natural gas liquids plants. See also footnote 2. 
For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work, and 
for dimension stone operations in manufactures in 1958, the cost of minerals received for preparation, is included with the cost of supplies, purchases 
for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

'Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufactiiring establishments, and for dimension 
stone mining operations in manufactures, excludes data for Iowa and Nebraska. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

''Except, in part, for value of shipments and value added in mining, excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction with 
quarries . 

"Represents number of mines and quarries, number of natural gas liquids plants, and, for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services 
industries, number of operating companies. 

'Excludes data for sand and gravel operations and for stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime plants. For 1929, there were 144 such sand 
and gravel establishments, with products valued at $11,555 thousand, and 20 such stone operations (the value of products of 18 of these stone quarries 
was $3,342 thousand). See also footnote 14. 

■"■^Excludes purchased electricity. For "All operations" in 1939, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to only 5 percent of the total kwh 
equivalent of energy used; and for "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries" in 1929, also to 5 percent. 

^■"■Includes data for lime plants producing lime valued at $520 thousand and for 7 cement plants. Excludes data for sand and gravel and clay mining 
operations. 

^^Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 

■"^^The cost of minerals received for preparation is included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 
See also footnote 4. 

•'■'^Except for number of establishments, includes data for 23 nonproducing operations in Missouri and South Dakota. See also footnote 7. 

^'Excludes data for common clay and shale operations. In 1939, there were 60 such mines with products of 59 of these mines amounting to $633 
thousand. 

■'■^Exoept for number of establishments, includes data for one establishment in the crude petroleum and natural gas industry in South Dakota. See 
also footnote 9. 

^'Except for number of establishments, includes data for 4 establishments in the crude petroleum and natural gas industry in North Dakota and 
South Dakota. See footnote 9. 

■^'Except for number of establishments, includes data for 2 oil field operations in Missouri. See also footnote 10. 



86 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
West North Central 



Table 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Industry group and industry 



Total 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All employees 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
$1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



fl,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



19 5a:^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added in 

mining 



fl,000) 



All mineral operations,,,,. 

Mineral Industries 

Included In manufactures. 



10 
108 



12 

1211 



13 
1311 



138 
1381 
1382 



14 



Metal mining 

Metal mining ser\'loes. 



Bitujnlnous and lignite coal mining 
Bituminous coal... 



Oil and gas exiiraction 

Crude petroleum and natural 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 



Oil and gas field services: 
Drilling oil and gas wells. 
Oil and gas exploration 
services.... 



Nonmetallic minerals mining. . 

Mineral Industries 

Included In manufactures. 



Dimension stone 

Dimension limestone 

Mineral subindustry 

Included In manufactures. 

Dimension granite , . . 

Mineral subindustry 

Included in manufactures. 



Dimension stone, nee. 



U2X 



Crushed and broken stone 

Mineral industry 

Included In manufactures. 



Crushed and broken limestone 
(mineral subindustry only)..., 

Crushed and broken granite 
(mineral subindustry) , 

Crushed and broken stone, nee 
(mineral subindustry only) . . . , 



1^1 



145 

1453 

1459 

147 
1472 



Sand and gravel 

Mineral Industry 

Included In manufactures.. 

Common sand and gravel 

(mineral subindustry only). 
Glass sand and molding sand. 



Clay and related minerals.... 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures . 



Fire clay , 

Mineral industry 

Clay and related minerals, neo, 

Mineral Industry , 

Included in manufactures . . . . , 



Chemical and fertilizer minerals; 
Barite ., 



3,384 

3,221 

163 

198 
12 

176 
130 

1,672 

1,088 

1,050 

38 

2^0 

19 

1,338 

1,175 

163 

54 
24 
12 
12 

22 

15 
7 



398 

374 

24 



Miscellaneous minerals, nee. 



345 

5 

24 



636 
50 

627 
9 

139 
78 
61 

52 
46 

69 
14 
55 

21 
28 



484 

452 

32 

73 
1 

21 
15 

193 

118 

111 

7 

44 



197 

165 

32 

13 
5 



111 
97 
14 



53,600 
50,928 
^2,672 



264,617 
253,055 
^11,562 



20,481^123,221 
927 



159 

2,201 
1,877 

16,946 
10,958 

10,430 
528 

3,356 

212 

13,972 
11,300 
^2,672 

1,692 

309 

56 

253 

982 

94 
888 

401 

6,085 

5 462 

%23 



5,154 

59 

249 

4,666 

4,456 

^210 



4,364 
92 

759 

567 

^192 

337 
303 

305 

147 

^158 



307 
^234 



9,700 

80,453 
53,703 
50,946 

2,757 

15,120 

1,143 

60,943 
49,381 
'11,562 

6,? 

1,141 

132 

1,009 

4,325 

267 

4,058 

1,522 

27,270 
24,315 
^2,955 



23,144 

271 

900 

20,516 

19,757 

^759 



19,376 
381 

3,016 

2.206 

^810 

1,253 
1,108 

1,316 

651 

^665 



1,060 
^874 



41,081 
38,591 
^2,490 

14,575 
133 

1,466 
1,182 

13,121 

7,789 

7,44S 

341 

2,973 

182 

11,919 

9,429 

^2,490 

1,479 

255 

37 

218 

873 

85 

788 

351 

5,208 

4 585 

^623 



4,324 

51 

210 

3,f 

3.676 

^210 

3,596 

80 

693 

501 

^192 

305 
271 

284 

126 

3l58 

273 
^225 



81,570 

76,427 

5,143 

^29,994 
279 

2,174 

26,161 

15,019 

14,353 

666 

6,099 

374 

25,415 

20,272 

5,143 

3,122 

460 

55 

405 

1,902 

170 

1,732 

760 

11,318 

10,071 

1,247 



9,560 
112 

399 

8,351 

7,931 

420 

7,764 
167 

1,362 
979 
383 

549 
482 

604 
288 
316 

551 

407 



184,952 

174,836 

10,116 

* 79, 699 
722 

(*) 
5,607 

56,544 
33,658 
31,960 

12,771 

921 

48,709 
38,593 
10,116 

5,446 

841 

67 

774 

3,397 

246 

3,151 

1,208 

22,067 

19,112 

2,955 



18,146 
223 

743 

16,108 

15,349 

759 



15,034 
315 

2,712 

1,902 

810 

1,130 
985 

1,206 
541 
665 



921 
819 



956,496 

918,673 

37,823 

5 ^351,911 
1,437 

(*) 
16,022 

448,647 

384,190 

347,666 

36,524 

31,384 

1,874 

155,938 

118,115 

37,823 

10,850 

1,602 

149 

1,453 

7,047 

778 

6,269 

2,201 

72,894 
57,426 
15,468 



54,603 

380 

2,443 

43,484 

44,747 

3,737 

44,014 
733 

10,042 
6,758 
3,284 

4,946 
3,894 

3,379 
1,147 
2,232 

4,527 
6,895 



2 503,995 
493,571 
^10,424 

'144,998 
491 

{') 
8,274 

287,829 

195,817 

187,493 

8,324 

21,760 

1,275 

271, 168 

60,744 

^10,424 

5,633 

616 

50 

566 

3,366 

302 

3,064 

1,651 

=37,396 
34,184 
=3,212 



31,935 
733 

1,516 

=21,210 

20 699 

^511 



20,142 
557 

=4,667 

3 695 

^972 

1,772 
1,484 

=1,928 

1,244 

=684 



915 

2744 



^1, 315, 218 

1,267,166 

=4S,052 

' *473,325 
1,844 

20,072 

634,728 

487,331 

448,407 

38,924 

47,499 

3,077 

^207, 165 
159,113 
24s, 052 

16,239 

2,155 

182 

1,973 

10,325 
1,064 
9,261 

3,759 

399,044 

80,364 

^18,680 



75,703 
1,051 
3,610 



^62,655 
58,407 
^4,246 



57,248 
1,159 

^13,893 

9,637 

34, 256 

6,389 
5,049 

35, 174 

2,258 

^2,916 

5,009 
^7,568 



■145,273 

145 078 

*195 

*23,584 
84 

4,224 

101,748 

92,676 

86,752 

5,924 

5,645 

72 

*19,941 

19,746 

*195 

244 
63 
17 
46 



16 
72 

93 

(NA) 

11,246 

(NA) 



10,835 

62 

349 

(NA) 

7,039 

(NA) 

6,908 
131 

(NA) 
816 
(NA) 

(NA) 
329 

(NA) 
133 
(NA) 

433 
"71 



54,163 
51,567 
^2,596 

21,358 
99 

(NA) 
1,949 

17,031 

10,406 

9,813 

593 

4,091 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

^2,596 

1,487 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



4,573 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

4,457 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

34^ 

116 

3 228 

379 
(NA) 



^813,247 

^785, 763 

27,484 

'320,488 
765 

(NA) 
15,471 

(NA) 

296,266 

267,380 

28,886 

39,884 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

27,484 

7,480 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



35,191 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

37,372 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

2,728 
1,135 
1,593 

2,381 
(NA) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. NA Not available. ■'■Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations 
in manufacturing establishments and for one clay mining operation in a manufacturing establishment in North Dakota, =For crushed and broken stone, 
sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing, and for dimension stone mining operations in manufacturing establishments in 
Nebraska, excludes the cost of purchased machinery installed, ■'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations 
in manufacturing establishments, the niimber of production and development workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were 
obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same figures are included for production and development workers and for all employees at 
such operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes the estimated value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment. 
^Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, and for dimension 
stone mining operations In manufacturing establishments In Nebraska. Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. ^Figures 
for Bituminous coal and lignite mining are combined with those for Metal mining. 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
West North Central 



87 



Table 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries: 195S 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group and Industry 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Total 



Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 



Total 



De- 
velop- 

nent 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment 



Net shipments of primary products^ 



By establish- 
ments classified 
in the Industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Va 1 ue 



($1,000) 



By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



10& 
12 
1211 

13 

1311 



138 
1381 



lA 
1A21 



14^1 



145 
1453 



147 



All mineral industries 

Metal mining and Bituminous 

coal and lignite mining 

Bituminous coal. 

Oil and gas extraction. 

Crude petroleum and natural 

gas 

Crude petroleum. 

Natural gas............ 

Oil and gas field services: 
Drilling oil and gas wells.., 

Nonmetallic minerals mining...... 

Crushed and broken stone....... 

Crushed and broken limestone. 

Sand and gravel.. .,., 

Common sand and gravel 

Clay and related minerals..,.., 
Fire clay 

Chemical and fertilizer 
minerals: 
Barite 



493,571 

144,998 
8,274 

287,829 

195,817 

187,493 

8,324 



21,760 

60,744 
34,184 
31,935 

20,699 
20,142 

3,695 
1,484 



915 



225,172 



^120,193 
34, 617 

^157,695 

76,542 

72,606 

3,936 



14,453 

^40,393 
21,764 
20,225 

13,905 
13,582 

^2,841 
1,113 



638 



93,109 



(') 

XXX 
XXX 
XXX 



XXX 

3 287 
119 
106 

120 
120 

(3) 



106,159 



11,474 
160 

87,795 

83,243 

79,876 

3,367 



3,176 

6,890 
3,716 
3,281 

2,528 
2,519 

340 
196 



211 



69,131 



13,331 
3,497 

42,339 

36,032 

35,011 

1,021 



4,131 

13,461 
8,585 
8,323 

4,146 
3,921 

514 

175 



145,078 



23,584 
4,224 

101,748 

92,676 

86,752 

5,924 



5,645 

19,746 
11,246 
10,835 

7,039 
6,908 

816 
329 



433 



47,891 



4,116 
16 

42,813 

41,961 

38,229 

3,732 



850 

962 
242 
224 

602 
602 

90 
73 



97,187 



19,468 
4,208 

58,935 

50,715 

48,523 

2,192 



4,795 

18,784 
11,004 
10,611 

6,437 
6,306 

726 
256 



433 



XXX 

4,572 



XXX 

'^038, 798 
'264,759 



XXX 

54,257 
50,896 

55,939 
55,371 

XXX 

1,149 



XXX 

18,839 



477,823 

407,423 

34,271 

5 48, 527 

XXX 

76,598 
71,943 

* 57, 199 
* 55, 784 

XXX 

5,030 



XXX 

''3,114 

'294,722 



XXX 

■^12,852 
■^12,851 

■^4,894 
■^4,849 



XXX 

'316 



4,199 

8,371 

31,957 



XXX 

■^19,942 
■^19,721 

(*) 

XXX 

■^1,340 



208 



■"•Represents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

■'The cost of minerals received for preparation is included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

^Represents thousands of barrels of crude petroleum, field condensate, and drips shipped or used. 

^Represents millions of cubic feet of natural gas shipped, 

^Figiires for primary products or services produced or performed in other industries are included with those for primary products or services 
produced or performed in the specified industry. For sand and gravel, see also footnote 7. 

''includes minerals produced and used in the same establishment in making manufactured products. The value of such minerals was estimated. The 
figure for the quantity of crushed and broken limestone shipped by establishments classified in other industries includes less than 40 thousand tana 
of stone other than limestone used in the manufacture of cement. 



88 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
West North Central 



Table 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 



(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producijig establishments 



Total 



Mining only 



Total 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods^ 



Mines vdth preparation plants 



Total 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 


Nonp re- 


rately 


ducing 


oper- 


estab- 


ated 


lish- 


prepa- 


ments 


ration 




plants 





10 



13 



U 



142 



144 



1453 



1472 



All establishments: 

Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining |l,000. 

Metal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. . .$1,000. 

Bituminous coal: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. . .$1,000. 

Oil and gas extraction: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining $1,000. 

Nonmetallio minerals 
mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. . .$1,000. 

Crushed and broken stone: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Crushed and broken 
limestone: 
Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added In 
mining $1,000. 

Sand and gravel: 

Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1 ,000. 

Fire clay: 

Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Barite: 

Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 



2,634 
^45,148 



868,377 



186 

^20,322 

(D) 



130 

1,877 

16,022 



1,109 
(D) 
(D) 



1,166 

11,251 

117,490 



374 
5,462 

57,426 



345 
5,154 

54,603 



636 
4,456 

44,747 



46 
303 



3,894 



21 
307 



4,527 



2,503 
41,645 

872,698 



147 

16,942 

331,790 



130 

1,877 

16,022 



1,031 
(D) 
(D) 



1,152 

11,227 

117,535 



371 
5,450 

57,463 



345 
5,154 

54,603 



634 
(D) 



(D) 



46 
303 

3,894 



17 
302 

4,530 



1,479 
15,086 

484,540 



70 
(D) 
(D) 



79 

282 

2,409 



1,010 

10,859 

386,544 



297 

1,427 

18,585 



39 
(D) 

(D) 



34 
340 

4,017 



152 
(D) 

(D) 



45 
(D) 

(D) 



114 



61 
(D) 

(D) 



20 
(D) 
(D) 



34 
137 
613 



2 
(D) 
(D) 



338 
(D) 

(D) 



49 

2,407 

76,066 



45 

145 

1,796 



226 

1,325 

17,039 



39 
(D) 



(D) 



34 
340 



4,017 



84 
425 

7,490 



45 
(D) 

(D) 



114 



1,080 
10,961 

388,055 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



1,010 

10,859 

386,544 



69 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



996 
24,799 

336,404 



74 

13,130 

219,687 



50 
(D) 
(D) 



852 
(D) 
(D) 



330 
5,041 

52,975 



311 
4,814 

50,586 



482 
3,933 

35,826 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



14 
283 

4,416 



46 
6,582 

55,955 



14 

5,839 

49,756 



18 
256 
927 



14 

487 

5,272 



11 
(D) 

(D) 



11 
(D) 

(D) 



827 
(D) 

(D) 



58 
(D) 
(D) 



31 
(D) 
(D) 



718 

8,090 

82,388 



312 
4,517 

47,290 



293 
4,290 



369 
2,928 

26,667 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



14 
283 



4,416 



123 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 
(D) 



1 

(D) 
(D) 



120 
(D) 
(D) 



7 
(D) 

(D) 



7 
(D) 

(D) 



113 
1,005 

9,159 



28 
1,760 

51,754 



3 

(D) 
(D) 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



.21 
(D) 
(D) 



3 
(D) 
(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. 

■"■Includes data for 60 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
^Includes data for 20 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
^Includes data for employees at central offices and related facilities which were not distributed by type of operation. 

*Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded capital 
expenditures . 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
West North Central 



89 



Table 3.-General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, by Counties: 1958 and 1954 

(For county statistics, see table 3 of the individual State Reports) 



Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group; 1958 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Gold and silver ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 Metal mining services 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 
120 Bituminous coal and ligulte 



12C Coal mining services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

lAl Dimension stone 

I'tlM Dimension stone in manufactures 

142 Crushed and broken stone 

142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 

144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel in manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Noniuetallie minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c, in 

manufactures 







All mineral operations 




Number of operations by industry group (See headnote 


for titles) — 






Division and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied In 
mineral 
indus- 
tries 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108 


109 


120 


12C 


131 


132 


138 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 

M 


147 


148 


149 


149 
M 


West North Central, 
total 


3,384 
389 

1,489 
550 
472 
339 

79 

51 

7 

4 

4 


3,221 
376 

1,411 
526 
456 
315 

75 

49 

6 

3 

4 


163 
13 
78 
24 
16 
24 

4 
2 

1 
1 


113 
5 
21 
11 
11 
15 

15 

26 

5 

2 

2 


2 

"i 

1 


25 
5 

10 
5 

1 


6 




2 


12 


38 
19 

14 
1 
3 

1 


173 
39 
58 
38 
17 
12 

8 

1 


3 
1 
2 


1,088 

174 

587 

119 

90 

79 

23 

14 

1 
1 


21 

"2 

2 
9 
8 


563 
25 

241 

103 

127 

53 

12 
2 


32 

3 
13 
10 

5 

1 


22 

"3 
5 
2 

7 

2 

1 
1 
1 


374 
12 

101 
71 
93 
90 

5 
2 


24 

i 

4 

5 

12 

1 
1 


636 

79 

292 

133 

79 

48 

4 
1 


50 

10 

28 

6 

3 

3 


78 

8 

33 

22 

8 

5 

2 


61 
3 

46 
8 

4 


24 

'io 

4 
5 

1 

4 


9 

3 
2 


22 
6 

11 
2 
1 
2 


6 


No employees . . . 










3 

"i 




2 


6 

1 
4 
1 








1 


10-19 employees 
20-49 employees 




2 
2 


50-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 


. • • 


"3 


. . • 

1 




... 


1 


250-499 employees. 


























500-999 employees. 
































1,000 employees 
and over 




1 


1 



































































SOUTH ATLANTIC 



91 



92 




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r) 

(A 

Z 
UJ 

O 



(- 



3 
< 
UJ 
CC 
3 
CD 



oo 

I 

CVI 

O 




C I— 

•3 o 

^ C/) 



< 

UJ 

>- 

Z 

UJ 

O 







O 
lO 



o 

O 



o 
in 



o 



o 
o 



< 
a. 



SQNVSnOHi Nl 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
South Atlantic 
Tabic 1.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations; 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract aervloe operations) 



93 



Kind of operation 
and year 



Establish- 
ments, 
number 



To- 
tal 



20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Man- 
hours 

ft.ooo) 



Wages 

($1,000) 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 



M,000) 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Supplies; 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
in- 
stalled 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ^ 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



Energy used 

(kwh 
equivalent) 



Total 

(mil- 
lion) 



Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 



Mineral industries 
only: 

1958 

1954 



Including operations 
in manufactures: 
All operations: 

1958 

1954'' 

1939? 

1919^° 

1909^° 

1902^2 

Excluding oil and 
gas extraction 
industries: 

1958 

1954'' 

1939^* 

1929^5 

1919^° 

1909^° 

1902^2 



4,701 
4,227 



4,875 
4,380 
'2,141 
2,296 
1,532 
^,174 



3,S40 
3,408 
^,590 
1,349 
1,540 
1,082 
^,675 



899 



930 
843 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



885 
793 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



106,066 
108,999 



108,816 
111,848 
141,898 
139,735 
114,473 
61,246 



103,440 
105,909 
134,538 
139,359 
126,071 
107,006 
56,263 



478 



42l' 



.,296 
.,261 



92,417 
98,602 



161,799 399,482 



487,949 
429,574 
173,211 
168,254 
55,769 
33,191 



467,940 
410,502 
164,132 
175,545 
153,317 
50,578 
29,382 



95,002 
101,328 
134,746 
129,844 
109,271 
^^56,694 



90,457 
96,125 
128,232 
132,089 
117,537 
102,514 
"52,260 



161,799 
176,135 



166,763 

181,592 

211,365 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



158,019 
172,204 
200,349 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



366*985 



408,309 
374,640 
157,882 
149,394 
50,004 
29,062 



392,191 
358,919 
150,435 
157,949 
136,973 
45,605 
25,878 



939,989 

^761,393 



969,764 

^782, 793 

243,276 

280,779 

81,551 

53,652 



914,596 

^720,490 

220,295 

245,493 

206,068 

65,527 

42,453 



^281, 858 

238, 



^94,560 

110 



995 *102 



=287,827 
=243, 903 
49,004 
60,933 
18,295 
12,018 



'272,637 
'231,570 
46,180 
51,082 
45,537 
11,486 
5,958 



194,842 
■^102,145 
(NA) 
5,890 
894 
(NA) 



^72,504 
^0,043 
(NA) 
(NA) 
18 



(NA) 



43,227 

39,317 



%3,251 
* 39, 332 
2,741 
4,472 
4,976 
5,422 



533, 828 
=28,741 
721 
719 
933 
525 
251 



93,637 
75,363 



'93,996 
^75,549 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,411,426 
^,118,407 



1,447,446 
% 144,729 
295,021 
352,074 
105,716 
71,092 



141,845 
98,768 



'142,234 
•^98,990 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



14,697 
12,953 



14,740 

12,994 

8,876 

%7,780 

(NA) 

(NA) 



987^ 



*85,658 

^69 
(NA) 
11,131 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,358,086 
' ,068,626 
267,196 
297,294 
252,556 
77,538 
48,662 



*121,137 
'82,213 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



'11, 
'10 



,366 
,848 



6,864 

I 9,229 

"•14,069 

(NA) 

(NA) 



159 

131 



155 
128 
66 
137 
(NA) 
(NA) 



126 
113 
54 
70 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



NA Not available. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufaotiiring establishments, includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of shipments (or production for 1919 and 
1909) and contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for preparation. The approximate magnitude 
of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other years, represents net production and 
excludes this duplication. For years prior to 1958, excludes the value of residue gas fron natural gas liquids plants. 

^The cost of minerals received for preparation in South Carolina is included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels 
and electricity. 

■'Excludes data for the Uranlum-Radium-Vanadlum Ores Industry. 

''Excludes the cost of natural gas processed at natural gas liquids plants, but includes the estimated value prior to processing of natural gas 
liquids contained in such gas . See also footnote 3. 

=For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is 
included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. For 1958, see also footnote 2. 

'Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

''Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Except, in part, for value of shipments and value added in mining, excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction with 
quarries . 

'Represents number of mines and quarries, number of natioral gas liquids plants, and, for the crude potrolevmi and natural gas and mining services 
industries, number of operating companies. 

•"■"Excludes data for sand and gravel operations and for stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime plants. For 1929, there were 61 such 
sand and gravel establishments, with products of 55 of •these establishments valued at $7,086 •thousand, and 29 such stone operations (•the value of 
products of 19 of these s^tone quarries was $3,180 •thousand). See also footnote 15. 

^■"•Excludes purchased electricity. For "All operations" in 1939, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to 9 percent of the total kvrti 
equivalent of energy used; and for "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries" in 1929, also to 9 percent. 

■"•^Includes data for lime plants producing lime valued at $861 •thousand and for 3 cement plants. Excludes data for sand and gravel and clay mining 
operations and for stone quarries at 7 cement plants -wi-th cement produced valued at $786 thousand. 

^'Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments -which operated for a shorter period. 
■"•^Includes data for one nonproducing operation in •the Crude Petroleum and Natiu'al Gas Industry in Florida. See also footnote 8. 
■"■^Excludes data for common clay and shale operations. In 1939 •there were 90 such mines (•the value of products of 89 of •these stone operations 
$887 thousand). 



94 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
South Atlantic 



Table 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry; 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Industry group and Industry 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development v/orkers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 



(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added tn 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



10 
109 

12 

1211 
1213 
12U 

13 
1311 



1321 
138 
1381 
1389 



l-i 



i<;ii 



U21 



1441 



145A 
U59 

1475 
U8 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures 

Metal mining 

Miscellaneous metal ores 

Bitimiinous coal mining 

Bituminous coal 

Goal stripping services, nee 

Coal mining services, nee 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas.. 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 

Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services 

Drilling oil and gas wells 

Oil and gas field services, nee 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures 

Dimension stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures 

Dimension limestone 

Dimension granite 

Mineral subindustry 

Included in manufactures 

Dimension stone, nee 

Mineral subindustry 

Included in manufactures 

Crushed and broken stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures 

Crushed and broken limestone 

(mineral subindustry only) .... 
Crushed and broken granite 

(mineral subindustiy ) 

Crushed and broken stone, nee 
(mineral subindustry only).... 

Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures 

Common sand and gravel (mineral 

subindustry only) 

Glass sand and molding sand 

Clay and related minerals 

Fire clay 

Fuller ' s earth 

Clay and related minerals, neo. 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures 

Chemical and fertilizer minerals. 

Phosphate rock 

Nonmetallic minerals services.... 
Miscellaneous minerals , nee 



4., 875 

4,701 

174 

58 
14 

2,708 

2,655 

47 

6 

1,035 
854 
332 
522 

38 
143 
106 

37 

1,074 

900 

174 

68 

41 

27 

8 

43 

27 

16 

17 

10 

7 

306 

281 

25 

171 

68 

42 
328 
304 

24 

292 
12 

183 

16 

7 

105 
19 
86 
45 
33 
16 

128 



930 
899 

31 

13 
7 

544 
536 



328 

297 

31 

23 

6 

17 

17 

5 

12 

6 

1 

5 

162 

153 

9 

84 

48 

21 

62 

59 

3 

53 
6 

42 
1 
6 

10 

10 

25 

19 

1 

13 



108,816 

106,066 

^2,750 

1,759 
665 

76,542 

75,925 

567 

50 

5,376 

3,975 

1,349 

2,626 

343 

1,058 

929 

129 

25,139 

22,389 

^2,750 

1,978 

429 

1,549 

45 

1,123 

324 

799 

810 

79 

731 

8,592 

8 180 

^412 



4,662 

2,430 

1,088 

4,422 

4,193 

5229 

3,654 

539 

34,619 

134 

594 

806 

493 

^313 

3,753 

3,259 

362 

^1,413 



487,949 

478,296 

^9,653 

6,845 
2,814 

365,309 

362,347 

2,859 

103 

20,009 
14, 374 
5,210 
9,164 
1,862 
3,773 
3,392 
381 

95,786 

86,133 

^9,653 

5,656 

1,059 

4,597 

125 

3,341 

838 

2,503 

2,190 

169 

2,021 

32,975 

31,078 

3l,897 

18,362 

8,529 

4,187 
17,519 
16,472 
^1,047 

14,329 

2,143 

^17,977 

645 

2,213 

3,120 

2,044 

^1,076 

16,717 

14,676 

794 

^4,148 



95,002 
92,417 
^2,585 

1,402 
467 

67,250 

66,687 

514 

49 

4,545 

3,228 

1,173 

2,055 

323 

994 

880 

114 

21,805 

19,220 

^2,585 

1,763 

379 

1,384 

31 

1,010 

302 

708 

722 

63 

659 

7,507 

7,095 

^412 

4,003 

2,144 

948 

3,835 

3 606 

3229 

3,164 

442 

^3,985 

132 

477 

735 

422 

^313 

3,114 

2,692 

358 

^1,243 



166,763 

161,799 

4,964 

2,565 
834 

110,149 

109,209 

862 

78 

8,744 
5,933 
2,228 
3,705 

649 
2,162 
1,986 

176 

45,305 

40,341 

4,964 

3,200 

638 

2,562 

45 

1,782 

536 

1,246 

1,373 

88 

1,285 

16,005 

15,181 

824 

8,296 

4,770 

2,115 

8,110 

7,652 

458 

6,732 
920 

8,376 
250 

1,042 

1,613 
988 
625 

6,546 

5,638 
654 

2,414 



408,309 

399,482 

8,827 

4,902 
1,724 

310,536 

307,820 

2,549 

167 

16,118 
10,877 
4,277 
6,600 
1,731 
3,510 
3,186 
324 

76,753 

67,926 

8,827 

4,705 

934 

3,771 

91 

2,787 

761 

2,026 

1,827 

147 

1,680 

26,671 

24,774 

1,897 

14,439 

6,978 

3,357 
14,177 
13,130 

1,047 

11,557 
1,573 

14,059 
634 
1,537 
2,604 
1,528 
1,076 

12,959 

11,413 

773 

3,409 



969,764 

939,989 

29,775 

12,944 
6,989 

642,475 

636,742 

5,397 

336 

55,168 
40,498 
5,996 
34,502 
8,501 
6,169 
5,300 



259,177 

229,402 

29,775 

8,302 

1,809 

6,493 

178 

5,040 

1,408 

3,632 

3,084 

330 

2,754 

93,924 

84,591 

9,333 

48,604 

23,288 

12,699 

49,395 

43,522 

5,873 

37,961 
5,561 

44,843 

800 

5,482 

10,920 
4,493 
6,427 

51,916 

47,822 
1,052 
9,755 



^619,916 

613,282 

^6,634 

9,816 
4,991 

387,596 

384,172 

3,240 

184 

55,289 

23,185 

4,657 

18,528 

28,759 

3,345 

2,836 

509 

^167, 215 

160,581 

^6,634 

3,315 

753 

2,562 

75 

2,330 

685 

1,645 

910 

59 

851 

^51,836 

49,964 

^1,872 

26,081 

15,813 

8,070 

2 21, 008 

20,384 

^624 

17,804 

2,580 

^23,926 

523 

2,818 

24, 401 

3,343 

^1,058 

63,905 

60,888 

259 

^2,966 



1,411,426 
3 36, 020 

18,841 
9,398 

944,624 

936,350 

7,782 

492 

89,360 

48,581 

8,728 

39,853 

31,895 

8,884 

7,529 

1,355 

3394, 621 

358,601 

^36,020 

11,114 

2,458 

8,656 

240 

7,139 

2,036 

5,103 

3,735 

342 

3,393 

^131, 865 

120,660 

^11,205 

66,987 

35,253 

18,420 

^64,652 

58,155 

^6,497 

50,811 
7,344 

^63,017 
1,289 
7,763 

^14,583 

7,098 

^7,485 

111,077 

104,298 
1,149 

^11,747 



*142,234 

141,845 

*389 

3,919 
2,582 

85,447 

84,564 

855 

28 

21,097 

15,102 

1,925 

13,177 

5,365 

630 

607 

23 

*31,77l 

■^31 382 

*389 

503 

104 

399 

13 

231 

57 

174 

259 

47 

212 

(NA) 

13,895 

(NA) 

7,698 

3,848 

2,349 
(NA) 

5,751 
(NA) 

4,954 

797 

^^5,752 

(NA) 

537 

(NA) 

738 

(NA) 

4,744 

4,412 

162 

*974 



111,848 

108,999 

^2,849 

2,085 
(NA) 

79,541 
79,156 

I 385 

5,939 
4,136 
1,580 
2,556 
430 
1,373 
1,147 
^226 

24,283 

21,434 

^2,849 

1,593 

f 1,593 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

3,852 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

4,144 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

495 

785 

325 

^460 

(NA) 

3,948 

97 

(NA) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. 

NA Not available. 

■"■Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased 
machinery installed . 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the number of production and 
development workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same 
figures are included for production and development workers and for all employees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes 
the estimated value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment at such operations . 

^Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium- Vanadium Ores Industry. 

*For 1954, no data were obtained on the cost of gas received for processing or on the value of residue gas. However, the estimated value, prior 
to processing of natural gas liquids contained in such gas was used in computing value added in mining. 

'Figures for one Metal Mining establishment with 5 to 9 employees are included with those for the Nonmetallic Minerals Mining Ind'ustries . 

^Includes data for the Oil and Gas Field Exploration Services Industry. 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
South Atlantic 

Tabic 2B. -Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of ooluran captions see Introduction) 



95 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group and industry 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Total 



Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 



De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 



Net shipments of primary products'' 



By establisn- 
ments classified 
in the industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



By establiohunents 
claasifled in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 



Quanti ty 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



10 
109 

12 

1211 

1213 

13 
1311 



1321 

138 

1381 

U 
1^21 



1441 



145 

1454 

1459 



147 
1475 



All mineral industries. 



Metal mining 

Miscellaneous metal ores. 



Bituminous coal mining 

Bituminous coal 

Coal stripping services, nee... 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 



Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services... 
Drilling oil and gas wells. 



Nonmetalllc minerals mining 

-Crushed and broken stone 

Criished and broken limestone. 
Crushed and broken granite... 
Crushed and broken stone, 
nee 



Sand and gravel 

Common sand and gravel 

Glass sand and molding sand. 

Clay and related minerals: 
Fuller 's earth 

Clay and related minerals. 



Chemical and fertilizer 

minerals 

Phosphate rock 



613,282 

9,816 
4,991 

387,596 

384,172 

3,240 

55,289 

23,185 

4,657 

18,528 

28,759 
3,345 
2,836 

160,581 
49,964 
26,081 
15,813 

8,070 

20,384 

17,804 

2,580 



2,818 
3,343 



63,905 
60,888 



^281, 858 

*6,622 
*2,919 

175,058 
173,001 

15,190 

11,456 

2,063 

9,393 

1,100 
2,634 
2,199 

86,336 
34,267 
17,372 
11,171 

5,724 

13,883 

12,176 
1,707 



*2,375 
2,602 



■^58,155 
16,777 



'194,560 

(*) 
(*) 

130,093 
130,093 

XXX 

22,338 
3CXX 
XXX 
XXX 

22,338 

XXX 

XXX 

40,781 
593 
591 



(^) 



(*) 
38,655 



43,227 

528 

118 

26,375 

26,013 

354 

9,423 
8,991 
2,179 
6,812 

278 
154 
125 

6,901 

3,774 

2,981 

61 

732 

1,654 

1,652 

2 



224 
42 



390 
200 



93,637 

2,666 
1,954 

56,070 

55,065 

1,000 

8,338 

2,738 

415 

2,323 

5,043 
557 

512 

26,563 

11,330 

5,137 

4,581 

1,612 

4,764 

3,893 

871 



219 
699 

5,360 
5,256 



141,845 

3,919 
2,582 

85,447 

84,564 

855 

21,097 

15,102 

1,925 

13,177 

5,365 
630 
607 

31,382 

13,895 

7,698 

3,848 

2,349 

5,751 

4,954 

797 



537 
738 



4,744 
4,412 



15,642 

844 
113 

3,703 
3,703 



10,084 

10,013 

1,202 

8,811 

XXX 

71 
48 

1,011 

182 

134 

47 



(D) 
6 

106 
66 



126,203 

3,075 
2,469 

81,744 

80,861 

855 

11,013 

5,089 

723 

4,366 

5,365 
559 
559 

30,371 

13,713 

7,564 

3,801 

2,348 

5,657 

4,862 

795 



(D) 
732 

4,638 
4,346 



XXX 

XXX 

XXX 

151,349 

XXX 

XXX 
XXX 

^2,223 
■^169, 507 

8 6,620 

XXX 

XXX, 

XXX 

69,796 
38,375 
23,219 

7,427 

45,984 

44,193 

1,335 



245 

1,24^ 



XXX 

12,136 



XXX 
XXX 

XXX 

806,869 
=7,782 

XXX 

48,418 

7,066 

38,989 

^10,702 

XXX 

^7,036 

XXX 

114,173 
61,274 
35,103 

16,4^9 

'59,167 

' '53, 601 

^5,566 



(D) 
7,098 



XXX 
XXX 



XXX 
XXX 



XXX 
XXX 

*296 
'6,942 



XXX 
XXX 

XXX 

'8,076 

'8,322 

'263 

'266 

'5,736 

'5,874 

318 



'5,036 



XXX 
XXX 

XXX 

(') 

XXX 

292 
1,028 
1,627 



XXX 

(=) 

XXX 

'12,700 

'10,245 

638 

'3,164 






'6,769 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

^Represents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation, 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

■'The cost of minerals received for preparation in South Carolina Is included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels 
and electricity. 

*The cost of minerals received for preparation is included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, purchased fuels and electricity. 

'Figures for primary products or services produced or performed in other Industries are included with those for primary products or services pro- 
duced or performed in the specified industry. 

^Represents thousands of barrels of crude petroleum, field condensate, and drips shipped or used. 

'Represents millions of cubic feet of natural gas shipped. 

^Represents net shipments of natural gas liquids only. The quantity is in thousands of barrels. 

'includes data for minerals produced and used in the same manufacturing establishment in making manufactured products. 



96 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
South Atlantic 

Table 2C— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Total 



Mining only 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods ■'■ 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 
rately 
oper- 
ated 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 



10 



109 



1211 



13 



1311 



1321 



14 



1421 



All establishments; 

Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Metal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Miscellaneous metal ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Bituminous coal: 

Nvimber of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Oil and gas extraction: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Crude petroleum and natural 



Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Natural gas liquids: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Nonmetallic minerals mining; 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Crushed and broken stone; 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Crushed and broken 
limestone: 
Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 



Crushed and broken granite: 
Number of establishments.... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Crushed and broken stone, neo. 
Number of establishments . . . . 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 



4,485 
103,981 

926,703 



54 
1,711 

12,612 



14 
665 



6,989 



2,655 
75,925 

636,742 



892 
4,318 

48,999 



854 
3,975 



40,498 



38 
343 



8,501 



884 
22,027 

228,350 



281 
8,180 

84,591 



171 
4,662 

48,604 



2,430 
23,288 

42 
1,088 

12,699 



4,4(>i 
103,719 

928,189 



44 
(D) 

(D) 



10 
658 

7,002 



2,637 
75 ,869 

636,775 



853 
(D) 

(D) 



817 
3,847 

41,803 



36 
(D) 

(D) 



870 
21,999 

228,416 



281 
8,180 

84,591 



171 
4,662 

48,604 

68 
2,430 

23,288 

42 
1,088 

12,699 



3,176 
(D) 

(D) 



308 



1,888 
20,483 

115,646 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



2,078 
22,093 

129,568 



817 
3,847 

41,803 



817 
3,847 

41,803 



^20,475 
*116,064 



289 
1,588 

14,028 



12 
(D) 

(D) 



10 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



19 
133 



603 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



357 
(D) 

(D) 



11 
(D) 

(D) 



130 
985 

7,281 



236 
1,359 

12,412 



11 
338 



4,064 



9 
326 

3,739 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



931 
(D) 

(D) 



79 
^^663 

^^6,223 



817 
3,847 

41,803 



817 
3,847 

41,803 



34 
96 

1,013 



1,079 
(D) 

(D) 



27 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



463 
52,485 

489,541 



354 
46,827 

433,000 



6 
(D) 

(D) 



335 
^45,476 

^423, 872 



573 
(D) 

(D) 



21 
760 

7,871 

8 
(D) 

(D) 



38 
5 665 

=5,838 



569 
19,500 

201,959 



264 
7,695 

76,775 



156 
4,189 



41,113 



67 
(D) 



13 
566 

5,365 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



494 
17,793 

184,286 



259 
7,230 

71,168 



153 
3,991 

39,107 



(D) 



41 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



67 
(D) 

(D) 



39 
(D) 

(D) 



152 
7,516 

72,337 



90 
6,344 



59,831 



62 
1,141 

12,308 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



149 
2,592 

39,033 



5 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



96 
1,291 

17,666 



36 
(D) 

(D) 



36 
(D) 

(D) 



12 

911 i 



12,429 



5 
(D) 



(D) 



5 
(D) 

(D) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
South Atlantic 



97 



Tabic 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



md. 
code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 

lish- 
msnts, 

total 



Producing establishments 



Total 



Mining only 



TotaL 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods'- 



Mines with preparation plants 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods' 



Sepa- 
rately 
oper- 
ated 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 



Nonpro- 
duclng 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 






145 
1454 



1459 



147 



1475 



Nonmetallic minerals mining^Jon. 
Sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees , 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. , 

Clay and related minerals: 
Fuller's earth: 
Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Clay and related minerals, 
nee: 
Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Chemical and fertilizer 
minerals: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Phosphate rock: 

Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 



3o; 

4,193 
43,522 



7 
594 

5,482 



19 
493 



4,493 



45 
3,753 

51,916 



33 
3,259 

47,822 



302 
(D) 

(D) 



7 
594 

5,482 



17 
(D) 

(D) 



40 
3,737 

51,925 



31 
(D) 

(D) 



102 
44^6 

3,874 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



250 



7 
(D) 



(D) 



68 
350 

2,861 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



250 



7 
(D) 

(D) 



1,013 



200 
(D) 

(D) 



6 
(D) 

(D) 



9 

432 



3,736 



25 
3,034 



43,337 



19 
2,560 

39,660 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



140 
2,769 

29,158 



6 
(D) 

(D) 



9 
432 

3,736 



24 
(D) 



60 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 



19 
2,560 

29,660 



686 
,338 



5 
673 



7,928 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

^Includes data for 23 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 

^Includes data for 20 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 

^Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeds capital 

expenditures . „ j j • 

^Figures for 16 mines with combination and other methods in Virginia are included with those for underground mines. 
4"igures for one open-pit mine in Virginia are included with those for underground mines. 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



5 
16 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



Table 3.-General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, by Counties: ,1958 and 1954 

(For county statistics, see table 3 of the Individual State Reports) 



98 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
South Atlantic 
Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group: 1958 



101 Iron ores 










12C 


Coal 


mining 


services 












144M Sand 


and 


jravel 


in 


manufactures 








102 Copper ores 




131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 






145 Clay and related minerals 






103 Lead and zinc ores 




132 Natural gas liquids 








145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 


104 Gold and silver ores 




138 Oil and gas field services 








147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 






105 Bauxite 




141 Dimension stone 








148 Nonmetallic minerals services 






106 Ferroalloy ores 




141M Dimension stone in manufactures 






149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 






108 Metal mining services 




14-2 Crushed and broken stone 








149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c, in 






109 Miscellaneous metal ores 


14-2M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 




manufactures 






120 Bituminous coal 




lAA Sand and gravel 
















All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


Division and 




Classi- 


In- 




















































size class 




fied in 
























































Total 


mineral 
indus- 
tries 


manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108 


109 


120 


12C 


131 


132 


138 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148 


149 


149 
M 


South Atlantic, 


























































total 


4,875 


4,701 


174 


11 


3 


3 


1 


9 


13 


4 


14 


2,655 


53 


854 


38 


143 


41 


27 


281 


25 


304 


24 


86 


97 


45 


16 


127 


1 


No employees 


291 


285 


6 


2 




. . • 




3 


1 


. . . 




81 


3 


121 


1 


• • > 


2 


• • > 


3 


• ■ • 


20 


3 


4 


3 


2 


2 


40 


• • > 


1-4 employees 


2,097 


2,009 


88 


4 


2 


1 




5 


5 


1 


4 


971 


15 


636 


26 


83 


13 


5 


36 


7 


122 


15 


25 


61 


9 


9 


42 


... 


5-9 employees 


839 


808 


31 








1 




1 


2 




581 


17 


45 


2 


28 


12 


2 


28 


3 


58 


2 


7 


24. 


5 


4 


17 


. . • 


10-19 employees . . . 


718 


700 


18 


5 




... 


... 


1 


4 




3 


486 


10 


25 


5 


18 


8 


3 


61 


6 


45 


1 


9 


8 


4 


... 


16 




20-49 employees . . . 


516 


494 


22 






1 






1 


1 


3 


259 


7 


16 


2 


14 


4 


11 


112 


3 


41 


2 


22 


1 


3 




8 




50-99 employees. . . 
100-249 employees. 
250-499 employees. 
500 employees and 


185 

137 

72 


179 

136 

70 


6 
1 
2 
















1 

3 


109 
92 

58 


1 


4 
4 
2 


2 


... 


2 


4 


32 
9 


1 


13 
4- 
1 


1 


7 
7 
5 


... 


6 

14 

1 


"i 


2 

1 
1 




... 


1 


"i 


... 


... 


1 




1 


... 


... 


... 


2 


















20 


20 




















18 


... 


1 






















1 


... 

















































EAST SOUTH CENTRAL 



99 



100 







O 



CD 


X 


lO 


(- 


O) 






U- 




o 




3 




< 
UJ 

tr 


CT) 


3 
CO 



oo 

LO 



cvj 
en 




t>0 I — 

1 o 

Eiffel 

UJ = UJ 



< 

LlJ 

>- 

CD 

z 

UJ 

O 



CD 
O 
CD 




^ 
?> 



O 

o 






o 



m 

CM 



o 



o 
o 



UJ 



< 

Q. 



SQNVSnOHl Nl 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 

East South Central 

Table 1— General Statistics for Mineral Operations; 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction, For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 



101 



Kind of operation 
and year 



Establish- 
ments, 

number 



To- 
tal 



20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 

:$i,ooo) 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Supplies^ 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
In- 
stalled 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ^ 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



Energy used 

(kwh 
equivalent) 



Total 

(mil- 
lion) 



Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 



Mineral Industries 
only: 

1958 

195^ 



Including operations 
in manufactures: 
All operations: 

1958 

1954' 

1939* 

1919^ 

1909* 

1902^° 

Excluding oil and 
gas extraction 
industries: 

1958 

1954' 

1939* 

1929^2 

1919* 

1909* 

1902^° 



3,215 
3,073 



3,311 
3,159 
1,«3 
1,418 
935 
1,270 



2,396 
2,432 
1,258 

952 
1,213 

847 
^,152 



575 
581 



595 
599 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



489 
509 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



62,083 
66,628 



63,755 
68,079 
93,949 
97,565 
66,700 
43,383 



54,045 
60,392 
92,001 
108,045 
94,968 
66,416 
43,086 



263,721 
240,006 



269,247 

244,415 

96,023 

111,745 

33,146 

22,787 



226,618 

216,737 

93,963 

117,610 

108,249 

32,968 

22,562 



54,294 
60,615 



55,890 
61,988 
89,522 
90,630 
63,014 
^,759 



47,835 
55,322 
87,789 

102,160 
88,549 
62,787 

^,597 



93,251 
104,304 



96,375 

107,058 

134,469 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



80,595 
94,605 
131,893 
(MA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



220,315 
206,919 



225,400 
210,951 
86,990 
98,839 
29,490 
20,446 



192,848 
188,628 
85,380 
105,042 
96,180 
29,365 
20,323 



651,249 
2 521, 131 



671,834 

^533,168 

130,531 

144,956 

40,562 

30,392 



464,705 

2 383, 599 

121,684 

151,384 

126,231 

39,944 

30,576 



181,075 
128,739 



^184,937 

131,679 

25,930 

32,974 

7,392 

4,174 



^138,166 

^103, 538 

24,863 

32,113 

28,675 

7,214 

3,841 



130,558 
^39,311 



130,748 

^39,502 

(NA) 

41 

170 

(NA) 



102,718 

^37,545 

(NA) 

(NA) 

170 
(NA) 



64,692 
41,495 



^64,695 

^41,500 

2,020 

3,674 

1,020 

869 



^17,648 
^10,405 
579 
314 
3,409 
924 
479 



55,421 
44,401 



"^55,564 
"^44,491 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



*37,459 
*27,358 
(NA) 
6,024 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



983,325 
^706,066 



l/)07,944 

2 721, 230 

158,481 

181,645 

49,144 

35,435 



717,921 

2533, 066 

147,126 

183,811 

158,315 

48,252 

34,896 



99,670 
69,011 



■^99,834 
*69,112 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



*42,775 
*29,381 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



12,104 
9,853 



*12,128 

*9,867 

5,742 

'14,315 

(NA) 

(NA) 



223 

163 



217 

159 

64 

158 

(NA) 

(NA) 



*5,!i27 


118 


*4,025 


73 


5,265 


60 


8,768 


86 


'13,942 


157 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 



NA Not available. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in man\afactuTing establishments, includes the estimated value of minerals 
produced and used in the same establishment in making manufactured products. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of shipments (or 
production for 1919 and 1909) and contains some dv5)lioation due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for preparation. 
The approximate magnitude of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other years repre- 
sents net production and excludes this duplication. For years prior to 1958, excludes the value of residue gas from natural gas liquids plants. 

^Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. For minerals received for preparation at natural gas liquids plants, excludes the 
cost of natural gas processed, but includes the estimated value prior to processing of natural gas liquids contained in such gas. 

'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract worK is included 
with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

^Excludes data for the crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturijig establishments. 

^Except, in part, for value of shipments and value added in mining, excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction with 
quarries. Except for number of establishments, excludes data for one service operation and one nonproducing operation. For "Excluding oil and gas ex- 
traction industries," except for number of establishments, includes data for 5 nonproducing operations in the Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Industry. 

'Represents number of mines and quarries, number of natural gas liquids plants, and for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services 
industries , number of operating companies . 

^Excludes data for sand, gravel, common clay, and shale mining operations and stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime plants. In 1939, 
there were 46 such clay and shale mines with products valued at $362 thousand. In 1929, there were 53 such sand and gravel establishments with 
products valued at nearly $6 million, and 19 such stone operations, 12 of which had products valued at $1,088 thousand. For 1919, excludes data for 3 
nonproducing establishments and, except for number of establishments, excludes data for 2 clay mines in Mississippi. For "Excluding oil and gas ex- 
traction industries," except for number of establishments, in 1919 includes data for 3 establishments in the Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Industry, 
and in 1909, for one such establishment. 

'Excludes purchased electricity. For 1939, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to nearly 9 percent of the total kwh equivalent of 
energy used. 

■'■''Excludes data for sand, gravel, common clay, and shale operations. Includes data for 2 cement plants and for lime plants producing lime valued at 
$488 thousand. For "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries," except for number of establishments, includes data for 2 operations in the Crude 
Petroleum and Natural Gas Industry in Tennessee. 

^ ^Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 

■"■^Excludes data for common clay and shale mining operations. In 1939, there were 46 such mines with products valued at $362 thousand. 



]02 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
East South Central 



Table 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Code 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Industry group and industry 



Total 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All employees 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 



(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



tl,000) 



195A1 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



10 
1062 

12 

1211 
1213 
1214 

13 

1311 



132 

138 

1381 

1382 

1389 



U 



1411 



U21 



1441 



145 



1453 



1459 



147 

1472 
1475 

148 

149 
1493 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures.... 

Metal mining 

Ferroalloy ores (manganese ores) 

Bituminous coal mining 

Bituminous coal 

Coal stripping services, nee.... 
Coal mining services, nee 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas. 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 

Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services 

Drilling oil and gas wells.... 
Oil and gas exploration 

services 

Oil and gas field services, 

nee 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures 

Dimension stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manuf aotxires . . . . 
Dimension stone , nee 

Crushed and broken stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures 

Crushed and broken limestone 
(mineral subindustry) 

Sand and gravel 

Mineral indus try 

Included in manufactures . . . . 
Common sand and gravel 

(mineral subindvistry only) . . . 
Glass sand and molding sand. . . 

Clay and related minerals 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures . . . . 

Fire clay 

Mineral industry 

Clay and related minerals, 
nee 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures.... 

Chemical and fertilizer 
minerals : 

Barite. 

Phosphate rock 

Nonmetallic minerals services... 

Miscellaneous minerals, nee; 
Mica 



3,311 

3,215 

96 

53 
9 

1,746 
1,730 

i 16 



915 

569 

503 

66 

11 

335 
259 

16 

60 

597 

501 

96 

45 
33 
12 
38 

227 

208 

19 

190 

163 
155 



142 
13 

113 
56 
57 

30 
24 

60 

9 

51 



595 

575 

20 

23 

1 

301 
298 



106 

56 

49 

7 



16 

165 

145 

20 

13 
5 
8 

12 

87 
77 
10 

73 

37 

35 

2 

33 
2 

16 
16 

3 
3 

4 
4 



63,755 
62,083 
^1,672 

5,208 
121 

38,684 
38,511 

173 

9,710 

5,393 

4,399 

994 

230 

4,087 
2,288 

862 

937 

10,153 

8,481 

^1,672 

1,277 
304 
973 

1,116 

4,487 

4 043 

^444 



3,358 

2,100 

2,030 

^70 

1,893 
137 

1,180 
998 
^182 

3 322 
296 



305 

149 

'l56 



67 
760 

73 



84 



269,247 

263,721 

^5,526 

22, 676 
422 

167, 704 
166,760 

944 



42,629 

25,685 

21,483 

4,202 

1,306 

15,638 
8,737 

3,837 

3,064 

36,238 
30,712 
^5,526 

3,622 

727 

2,895 

3,057 

15,851 
14,062 
^1,789 



13,549 

7,957 

7,743 

^214 



7,304 
439 

4,008 

^628 

3 1,266 
1,124 



985 

499 

'436 



138 
3,631 

222 
242 



55,890 
54,294 
^1,596 

4,326 
101 

34,529 
34,367 

162 



3,055 

4,125 

3,338 

787 

202 

3,728 
2,087 

789 

852 

8,980 
7,384 
^1,596 

1,178 

' 281 

897 

1,026 

4,002 

3 558 

3444 



3,397 

1,803 

1,733 

'70 



1,620 
113 

1,023 

841 

^182 

3 295 
269 



289 
133 
'156 



60 
645 

67 



66 



96,375 

93,251 

3,124 

7,502 
218 

53,873 
53,624 

249 



15,780 
7,914 
6,528 
1,386 

4O0 

7,466 
4,047 

1,711 

1,708 

19,220 

16,096 

3,124 

2,192 

459 

1,733 

1,901 

3,555 
7,667 



7,346 

4,486 

4,347 

139 

4,110 
237 

1,971 

1,606 

365 

472 
420 

571 
258 
313 



77 
1,415 

123 



151 



225,400 

220,315 

5,085 

18,645 
322 

144,267 
143,461 

806 

32,552 

17,788 

14,853 

2,935 

1,103 

13,661 
7,625 

3,213 

2,823 

29,936 

24,851 

5,085 

3,125 

671 

2,454 

2,627 

13,478 

11,689 

1,789 



11,211 

6,368 

6,154 

214 

5,785 
369 

3,202 

2,574 

628 

1,134 
992 



361 
375 
486 



106 
,838 

201 
196 



671,834 

651,249 

20,585 

61,215 
613 

304,972 
302,832 

2,140 



207,129 

170,708 

146,556 

24,152 

9,011 

27,410 
17,985 

3,714 

5,711 

93,518 
77,933 
20,585 

6,076 
1,306 
4,770 
5,011 

45,548 

37,868 

7,630 

36,584 

19,540 

17,848 

1,692 

16,675 
1,173 

16,637 
9,400 
7,237 

2,469 
1,711 



7,401 

922 

6,479 



413 
,723 

455 



377 



2435,944 

431,746 

24, 198 

47,855 
459 

200,480 
199,417 

1,063 



139,953 
87,594 
76,612 
10,982 

33,473 

13,386 
14,330 

1,540 

3,016 

247, 656 
43,458 
24,198 

1,935 

411 

1,574 

1,571 

^23,779 
21,994 
^1,785 



21,414 

23, 796 

8 593 

2 203 



8,115 
478 

=4,245 

3 609 

2 636 

2 761 
675 



21,143 

593 

2550 



342 
6,871 

293 
410 



^007,944 
983,325 
^24,619 

103,922 
992 

430,152 
477,196 

2,956 

290,023 

210,267 

184,345 

25,922 

37,543 

42,213 
29,422 

4,569 

8,222 

3133,847 
109,228 
^24,619 

7,657 
1,477 
6,180 
6,363 

'62,647 
53,132 
39, 465 

51,718 

^24,707 
22,812 
^1,895 

21,457 
1,355 

'20,181 
12,308 
'7,873 

3,135 
2,291 

8,475 
1,446 
7,029 



698 
15,302 

669 
549 



*99,834 
99,670 
164 



i. 



5,148 



25,300 
25,053 

247 



57,059 

43,035 

38,823 

9,212 

4,941 

4,083 
2,893 

685 

505 

^12,327 

12,163 

*164 

404 
240 
164 
219 

■^6,680 

6,680 

(NA) 

6,280 

■^3,629 

3,629 

(NA) 

3,333 
296 

(NA) 
701 
(NA) 

95 

■^69 

69 

(NA) 



57 
292 

79 



238 



68,079 
66,628 
'1,451 

4,800 
152 

44,713 
44,608 

105 



7,687 

4,633 

4,220 

413 

236 

2,818 
2,002 



816 



10,879 
9,428 
31,451 

1,440 

\ 1,440 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

3,433 

(NA) 

2,166 

(MA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

300 
113 
137 



(NA) 
791 

224 



(NA) 



NA Not available. 

■"■Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

2For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machinery 
installed. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the number of production and development 
workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operation, hence, the same figures are in- 
cluded for production and development workers and for all enjjloyees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes the estimated 
value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment at such operations. 

Excludes figures for cr\ished and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industrjf. 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
East South Central 



103 



Tabic 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Code 



Industry group end industry 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 



Total 



De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 



Net shipments of primary products^ 



By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



10 



12 
1211 



13 

1311 



1321 
13S 
13S1 
1389 



14 

U21 



1441 



145 
147 



1475 



All mineral industries 

Metal mining 

Bituminous coal mining 

Bituminous coal 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gai 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 

Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services.... 
Drilling oil and gas v/ells.. 
Oil and gas field services, 
nee 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Crushed and broken stone 

Crushed and broken limestone 

Sand and gravel , 

Common sand and gravel 

Clay and related minerals , 

Chemical and fertilizer 
minerals: 
Phosphate rock , 



431,746 

47,S55 

200,450 
199,417 



139,953 
87, 594 
76,612 
10,982 

33,473 
18,886 
14,330 

3,016 

43,458 
21,994 
21,414 

8,593 
8,115 

3,609 



5,871 



181,075 

^41,279 

91,324 
90,763 

46,771 
33,139 
28,337 
4,802 

572 

13,060 

9,816 

2,378 

^31,565 

14,796 
14,444 

^5,706 
^5,466 

2,799 



3,790 



130,558 

72,664 
72,664 

28,030 

XXX 

XXX 
XXX 

28,030 

XXX 
XXX 



318 

313 

(2) 



2,428 



64,692 

3,244 

11,643 
11,579 

47,047 

40,277 

35,595 

4,682 

4,721 
2,049 
1,869 

110 

2,758 
1,088 
1,054 

820 
740 



304 



55,421 

3,332 

24,849 
24,411 

18,105 

14,178 

12,680 

1,498 

150 
3,777 
2,645 

528 

9,135 
5,792 
5,603 

2,067 
1,909 

443 



349 



99,670 

5,148 

25,300 
25,053 

57,059 

48,035 

33,823 

9,212 

4,941 
4,083 
2,893 

505 

12,163 
6,680 
6,280 

3,629 
3,333 



292 



27,901 

1,007 

1,225 
1,225 

25,297 

25,203 

19,643 

5,560 

'94 
62 

32 

372 

112 
112 

56 
56 



29 



4,141 

24,075 
23,828 

31,762 

22,832 

19,180 

3,652 

4,941 
3,989 
2,831 

473 

11,791 
6,568 
6,168 

3,573 
3,277 

620 



263 



XXX 

84,736 

XXX 
XXX 

*57,657 
^116, 864 

^7,312 

XXX 
XXX 

XXX 

XXX 

36,490 
36,135 

20,664 
19,667 



°1,529 



XXX 

396,265 

XXX 

205,613 

164,157 

22,751 

^12,158 

XXX 

''so, 810 
■78,723 

XXX 

51,704 
50,302 

'23,381 
'21,711 



13,042 



XXX 

XXX 

*1,893 
599,433 

XXX 
XXX 



XXX 

87,954 
87,394 

81, 290 

81,312 



XXX 
XXX 
XXX 



XXX 

2,571 
5,502 

15,774 

XXX 

(') 

C) 

XXX 

89,897 
89,586 



^Represents gross shipments of the mineral Indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both nev; and used plant and equipment. 

■'The cost of minerals received for preparation is combined v/ith the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

^Represents thousands of barrels of crude petroleum, field condensate, and drips shipped or used. 

'Represents millions of cubic feet of natural gas shipped. 

^Represents net shipments of natural gas liquids only. Quantity figures are in thousands of barrels. 

''Figures for primary services performed in other industries are included v;ith those for primary services performed in the specified industry. 

8lncludes minerals produced and used in the same establishment in making manufactured products. The value of such minerals was estimated. For 
crushed and broken limestone, also includes data for less than 40 thousand tons of other stone used in making cement. 

'Figures for the value of primary products shipped in other industries or subindustries are included with those for the value of primary products 
shipped in the specified industry or subindustry. See also footnote 8. 
■"■"Represents thousands of long tons. 



104 GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 

East South Central 

Table 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Total 



Mining only 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods •"■ 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 


Nonpro 


rately 


duclng 


oper- 


estab- 


ated 


lish- 


prepa- 


ments 


ration 




plants 





10 



1211 



13 



U 



1421 



1441 



All establishments: 
Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Metal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining $1,000. 

Bituminous coal: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. .. .$1,000. 

Oil and gas extraction: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. .. .$1,000. 

Nonmetallic minerals 
mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining .$1,000. 

Crushed and broken stone: 

Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Crushed and broken lime- 
stone: 
Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Sand and gravel: 

Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 



145 



1475 



Common sand and gravel: 
Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Clay and related 
minerals : 
Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining 



,000. 



Phosphate rock: 

Number of establish- 
ments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 



2,856 
357,566 

^619, 563 



50 

5,003 

59,420 



1,730 

38,511 

302,832 



580 

5,623 

179,719 



496 

8,408 

77,478 



208 
4,043 

37,868 



190 
3,858 



36,584 



155 
2,030 

17,848 



142 
1,893 

16,675 



56 
998 

9,400 



18 
760 



8,723 



2,764 
357,395 

^620,403 



48 
(D) 
(D) 



1,721 

38,473 

302,286 



503 

5,543 

181,039 



492 

(D) 
CD) 



208 
4,043 

37,868 



190 
3,858 

36,534 



152 
2,023 

17,855 



149 
1,886 

16,682 



9,400 



18 
760 

8,723 



2,002 
21,222 

272,241 



14 
1,270 
8,852 



1,359 
13,249 
81,449 



492 

5,313 

172,028 



137 
1,390 
9,912 



18 
(D) 

(D) 



13 
305 



2,613 



42 
177 

1,712 



40 
(D) 

(D) 



29 
345 

2,250 



10 
(D) 

(D) 



1,196 

(D) 

(D) 



1,229 
8,643 



1,180 
10,997 
55,491 



10 

(D) 
(D) 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



6 
220 

1,059 



231 

(D) 

(D) 



41 
209 



117 

883 

9,388 



106 
(D) 
(D) 



16 
329 

2,636 



11 
(D) 

(D) 



21 
111 

1,115 



20 

(D) 

(D) 



23 
125 



1,191 



10 
(D) 

(D) 



575 
6,748 

189,195 



62 

1,369 

16,570 



492 

5,313 

172,028 



21 

66 

597 



597 



20 
(D) 

(D) 



682 
34,636 

306,717 



32 
(D) 
(D) 



301 

24,460 

214,016 



349 
(D) 
(D) 



189 
3,672 

34,916 



177 
3,553 

33,971 



109 
(D) 

(D) 

98 
1,720 

14,790 



27 
653 

7,150 



5 
520 

6,489 



250 

(D) 

(D) 



6 

(D) 
(D) 



214 

20,852 

159,918 



30 
(D) 
(D) 



25 
593 

4,270 



25 
293 

4,270 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



361 
7,891 

98,785 



25 

372 
3,275 



60 

2,081 

40,571 



276 

5,438 

54,939 



164 
3,079 

30,646 



152 
2,960 

29,701 



66 
1,043 

9,342 



55 
(D) 

(D) 



26 

(D) 

(D) 



5 
520 



6,489 



71 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



27 

1,527 

13,527 



43 
(D) 
(D) 



43 
(D) 

(D) 



43 

(D) 

(D) 



80 
31,537 

341,445 



2 
(D) 
(D) 



61 

764 

6,821 



11 

230 

9,011 



6 

(D) 
(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



3 

(D) 

(D) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

■^Includes data for 17 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
^Includes data for 6 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
3lncludes data for one nonmetallic minerals services establishment in Mississippi. 

*Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded capital 
expenditures . 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
East South Central 



105 



Table 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, by Counties: 1958 and 1954 

(For county statistics, see table 3 of the individual State Reports) 



Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group: 1958 



101 Iron ores 










12C 


Coal 


mining 


services 












14^M Sand 


and 


gravel 


in 


manufactures 








102 Copper ores 










131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 




145 Clay and related minerals 


103 Lead and zinc ores 








132 Natural gas liquids 






145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 


104 Ck3ld and silver 


ores 








138 Oil and gas field services 






147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 


105 Bauxite 










141 Dimension stone 






148 Nonmetallic minerals services 


106 Ferroalloy ores 










141M Dimension stone in manufactures 




149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 


108 Metal mining services 








142 Crushed and broken stone 






149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c, in 


109 Miscellaneous metal ores 






142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 




manufactures 


120 Bitiminous coal 










144 Sand and gravel 










All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headmote for titles) — 


Division and size 




Classi- 


In- 
cluded 




















































class 




fied in 






















































Total 


mineral 
indus- 
tries 


manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108 


109 


120 


12C 


131 


132 


138 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148 


149 


149 
M 


East South Central, 


























































total 


3,311 
262 

1,270 
606 
578 


3,215 
258 

1,222 
592 
568 


96 
4 
48 
14 
10 


32 
9 
5 
4 

1 




7 


... 


2 


9 

1 
2 
1 
4 


3 

1 




1,730 

95 

649 

375 

313 


16 
3 
5 

1 
4 


569 

122 

279 

73 

39 


11 

"3 

2 

1 


335 
6 

163 
68 
53 


33 
5 

12 
6 
5 


12 

"2 

1 
1 


208 

1 

21 

22 

87 


19 

"2 

1 
6 


155 

9 

56 

24 

31 


8 

"'4 

1 
1 


56 
4 

14 
9 

13 


57 

4 

40 

11 

2 


37 
1 

10 
6 

11 


5 

1 

"3 


7 

"3 

1 
1 




No employees 




1-4 employees 












5-9 employees 












10-19 employees . . . 




1 




1 




20-49 employees . . . 


365 


353 


12 


4 




2 


... 


1 


... 


... 




157 


3 


36 


4 


27 


5 


2 


67 


8 


29 


2 


12 


... 


4 


1 


1 




50-99 employees . . . 


110 


107 


3 


3 




1 






1 


2 




52 




12 


1 


13 




1 


9 


2 


6 




3 




3 




1 




100-249 employees. 


79 

31 
9 


75 

30 

9 


4 

1 


1 
3 

1 




2 

1 












58 

25 

6 


;;; 


6 

1 

1 


... 


4 

i 


... 


4 

1 


1 


... 


... 


... 


1 


... 


2 


... 


... 




250^99 employees. 














500-999 employees. 




























1,000-2,499 








































employees 


1 


1 


... 


1 
















... 


... 














































* 

































WEST SOUTH CENTRAL 



107 



108 



C50 
LO 




Illll 
■iJ 



00 

IT) 






z 

UJ 

o 



ID 
< 
UJ 

m 



o 



o 



'^3 
E O 

■i CO 

■5 CO 
^ LU 

o 





0> 


— 


^ 




CJ 


^ 




■^ 


<J> 




_l 


(~i 




to 


<t 


O 


q: 
o 
u. 


_l 
< 


o 


< 


UJ 


O 


(r 


UJ 


z 


z 


X 


_j 

DO 


2 


< 


UJ 

< 


< 

-J 
< 


o 

_l 

_J 


o 

z 

z 


n 


^ 


i2 


s 


z 


1— 


UJ 


-J 


< 


o 


:k 


< 




z 


z 


H 


_j 


o 


UJ 



CT) 



llHI 



< 

UJ 

>- 
z 

LJ 

o 




o 



CF) 



o 
o 



o 

lO 



o 
o 



o 

lO 



o 
tij 



O 
o 

li. 
o 

I- 
z 



< 
Q. 



SQNVSnOHi Nl 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 

West South Central 

Table 1— General Statistics for Mineral Operations: 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



109 



Kind of operation 
and year 



Establish- 
ments, 
number 



To- 
tal 



20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
:$1,000) 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machiD- 

ery 

in- 
stalled 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ^ 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



Energy used 

(kwh 
equivalent) 



Total 

(mil- 
lion) 



Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 



Mineral Industries 
only: 

1958 

1954 



Including operations 
in meinuf actures : 
All operations: 

1958 

1954* 

1939' 

1919' 

1909«, 

1902'-^ 

Excluding oil and 
gas extraction 
Industries : 

1958 

1954« 

1939'' 

1929^* 

1919^' 

1909^* 

1902^'' 



10,062 
9,179 



10,216 
9,306 
'6,252 
2,919 
1.302 
^536 



869 
840 

^626 
498 
429 
363 

8237 



1,896 
1,906 



1,918 
1,938 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



214 
213 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



225,804 
223,679 



1,231^80 
1,»4,616 



227,261 

225, 

122,938 

72,172 

26,129 

8,532 



17, 285 
18,822 
17, 187 
24, 201 
23,300 
19,715 
6,725 



433 1,0;9 



1,236,336 

222 

203,232 

109, 758 

18, 208 

5,279 



78,617 
71, 141 
18, 257 
31,772 
29,000 
12, 114 
4,049 



151,708 
165,208 



153,129 

166,957 

98,687 

60,805 

24,028 

1^7,044 



14, 161 
16,598 
15,491 
22,314 
20,958 
18,801 
^^6,273 



320, 248 
358,039 



323,006 

361,436 

176, 345 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



30,664 
36,255 
28,428 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



719,783 
688,469 



724,927 

693,048 

137,938 

88,474 

15,748 

4,363 



59,338 
59,417 
14,484 
26,609 
25,680 
11,175 
3,616 



6,158,639 
^5,209, 798 



6,186,121 

%, 226, 592 

809,276 

299,365 

35,312 

7,072 



254,299 
2 258, 312 
56,986 
42,995 
44,611 
14,157 
5,238 



1,127,398 
918,826 



*1, 132, 277 

*922,678 

83,045 

124,313 

9,541 

1,402 



*61,994 

^58,994 

11,853 

20,842 

14,094 

2,488 

674 



634,542 
^,49, 323 



1,067,066 
1,03,501 



634, 662(^1,067,092 
3149,323 

(NA) 

^'il,026 

1^173 

(NA) 



1,029,511 

122,948 

48,023 

2,505 

1,814 



3,687 

=7,861 

(NA) 

(NA) 



(NA) 



^^11,018 
*8,492 
420 
443 
550 
137 
186 



464,945 
615,825 



^464, 959 
'615, 875 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



=20,046 
'16,746 
(NA) 
4,229 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



7,917,123 
%,397,677 



1,535,457 
1, 525,548 



7,949,606 

=6,418, 352 

1,015,269 

482,727 

47,531 

10,288 



319,175 
=331,121 
69,259 
64, 280 
59,255 
16, 782 
6,098 



^,535,505 
=1,25,379 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



^31,869 
'19,284 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



237,107 
217,257 



= 237,115 
=217,268 
106, 337 
^^22,527 
(NA) 
(NA) 



5 15, 118 

=16,184 

5,919 

9,787 

"■15,321 

(NA) 

(NA) 



1,563 
1,315 



1,548 

1,301 

1,078 

370 

(NA) 

(NA) 



1,068 
975 
382 
439 
254 
(MA) 
(NA) 



NA Not available. 

^For crushed and "broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. Includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of shipments (or production for 1919 and 
1909) and contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for preparation.. The approximate magnitude 
of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other years, represents net production and 
excludes this duplication. For years prior to 1958, excludes the value of residue gas from natural gas liquids plants. 

^Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. For "Minerals received for Preparation" for "Including operations in manufactures," 
see also footnote 4. 

^Excludes the cost of natural gas processed at natural gas liquids plants, but includes the estimated value prior to processing of natural gas 
liquids contained is such gas. See also footnote 2. 

*For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work, and 
in 1954 for dimension stone operations in manufactures, the cost of minerals received for preparation, is Included with the cost of supplies, purchases 
for resalej and purchased fuels and electricity. 

=Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

''Except, in part, for value of shipments and value added in mining, excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction with 
quarries. 

'Represents number of mines and quarries, number of natural gas liquids plants, and, for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services 
industries, number of operating companies. 

'Excludes data for sand and gravel operations and for stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime plants. For 1929, there were 95 such 
sand and gravel establishments, with products valued at $10,607 thousand, and 15 such stone operations (the value of products of 11 of these stone op- 
erations was $991 thousand). See also footnote 14. For 1919, except for number of establishments, excludes data for one limestone and one sulfur 
establishment in Louisiana, 

■"■"Represents the cost of gas purchased as a material and for resale. 

^Excludes purchased electricity. For "All operations" in 1939, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to only 0.4 percent of the total kwh 
equivalent of energy used, and for "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries" in 1929, to 1.4 percent. 

■"■^Includes data for lime plants producing lime valued at $165 thousand and for 2 cement plants. Excludes data for sand and gravel and clay mining 
operations. 

■"•^Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 

■"■^Excludes data for common clay and shale operations. In 1939, there were 57 such mines with products valued at $448 thousand. 

•'■=Except for number of establishments, includes data for 28 nonproduoing operations in -the Oil and Gas Extraction Industries in Oklahoma. See also 
footnote 9. 

■•■^Except for number of establishments, includes data for 11 nonproduoing operations in the Oil and Gas Extraction Industries in Oklahoma, and ex- 
cludes data for one limestone and one sulfur establishment in Louisiana. See also footnote 9. 

■'■''Exoept for number of establishments. Includes data for 3 establishments in the Oil and Gas Extraction Industries in Louisiana and Oklahoma. See 
also footnote 12. 



no MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 

West South Central 
Table 2A— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Industry group and industry- 



Total 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All employees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development vrorkers 



Man- 
hours 



(1,000) 



Wages 



($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



fl,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



f 1,0 00) 



19M1 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



10 
&. 12 
1051 

1062 
1211 

13 
1311 



1321 

138 

1381 

1382 

1389 



U 



Wll 



U21 



1-Wl 



U59 



W7 
U76 
1^79 

K8 



All minerals operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manxif actures 

Metal mining and Bituminous coal 

and lignite mining 

Bauxite 

Ferroalloy ores (Manganese ores ) . 
Bituminous coal 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas . . 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 

Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services 

Drilling oil and gas wells 

Oil and gas exploration 
services 

Oil and gas field services, nee 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures 

Dimension stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures 

Dimension stone, nee 

Mineral subindustry 

Included in maniif actures 

Crushed and broken stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures 

Crushed and broken limestone 
(Mineral subindustry only).... 

Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures 

Common sand and gravel (Mineral 

subindustry only ) 

Glass sand and molding sand.... 

Clay and related minerals 

Fire clay 

Clay and related minerals, nee. 

Mineral Industry 

Included in manufactures 

Chemical and fertilizer minerals . 
Rock salt 

Chemical -fertilizer mining, nee 

Nonmetallic minerals services .... 
Miscellaneous minerals, nee 



10,216 
10,062 
154 



148 
18 

19 
60 

9,347 

5,625 

5,286 

339 

387 
3,335 

1,581 

210 

1,544 

721 
567 
154 

42 
27 

15 

23 

18 
5 

100 
82 
18 

57 

372 

354 

18 

345 
9 

125 
13 

101 
15 



1,918 

1,896 

22 



32 



4 
14 

1,704 

576 

522 

54 

213 
915 
553 

56 
306 

182 

160 

22 

9 
3 
6 



227,261 

225,804 

^1,457 



2,742 
632 

239 
1,059 

209,976 

112,039 

105,332 

6,707 

12,275 
85,662 
39,438 

7,364 
38,860 

14,543 
13,086 
^1,457 

518 
188 
330 

119 

77 
42 

2,762 

2,372 

^390 

1,901 

4,782 

4,414 

^368 



4,274 
140 

^809 
^66 

582 

341 
^241 

4,804 

807 

72 

265 
^603 



1,236,506 

1,231,180 

'5,326 



13,822 
3,381 

552 
5,524 

1,157,8© 

668,127 

629,514 

38,613 

71,006 
418,756 
193,345 

33,084 
192,327 

64,795 
59,469 
^5,326 

1,536 

448 

1,088 

208 

145 

63 

11,209 
9,628 

3l,581 

7,809 

18,318 
16,990 
^1,328 

16,488 
502 

^2,796 
^217 

2,027 

1,274 

^753 

27, 560 

3,347 

342 

661 
^2,715 



153,129 

151,708 

^1,421 



2,142 
447 

206 
974 

138,968 

58,320 

54,659 

3,661 

9,763 
70,885 
34,514 

5,635 
30,736 

12,019 
10,598 
^1,421 

455 
161 
294 

100 
63 
37 

2,437 

2,047 

^390 



1,637 

4,217 

3,849 

^368 



3,727 
122 

^746 
361 

553 

312 
^241 

3,428 

722 

56 

259 
3477 



323,006 

320,248 

2,758 



4,164 
813 

366 
1,797 

292,342 

116,523 

108,742 

7,781 

19,649 

156,170 

73,169 

12,363 
70, 638 

26,500 

23,742 

2,758 

745 
284 
461 

133 

100 

33 

5,805 
5,026 

779 

4,022 

9,966 

9,229 

737 



8,979 
250 

1,586 
117 

1,204 
722 
482 

6,940 

1,485 

102 

419 
1,039 



724,927 

719,783 

5,144 



10,480 
2,182 

491 
5,002 

665,589 

293,901 

274,745 

19,156 

54,347 
317, 341 
158,486 

22,478 
136,377 

48,858 

43,714 

5,144 

1,293 
384 
909 

179 

122 

57 

9,632 

8,051 
1,581 

6,419 

15,462 

14, 134 

1,328 

13,718 
416 

2,351 
192 

1,774 

1,021 

753 

17, 719 

2,846 

253 

636 
1,765 



6,186,121 

6,158,639 

27,482 



39,458 
15,023 

1,478 
10, 618 

5,931,822 

4,654,605 

4,344,305 

310, 300 

440,047 
837,170 
401,270 

48,044 
387,856 

214,841 

187,359 

27,482 

2,678 
963 

1,715 

417 

326 

91 

29,529 

19,750 

9,779 

15,695 

48,866 

43,376 

5,490 

41,703 
1,673 

6,820 
1,720 

3,703 
2,198 
1,505 

114,252 

12,408 

2,294 

1,000 
11,696 



23, 298, 990 

3,293,941 
^5,049 



13,309 
3,607 

302 
4,622 

3,202,245 

1,967,863 

1,804,922 

162,941 

728,473 
505,909 
294,039 

20,266 
191,604 

2 83, 436 
78,387 
=5,049 

1,711 

288 

1,423 

111 
80 
31 

=14,285 
13,028 
=1,257 

10,294 

=21,859 

21,100 

= 759 



20,236 
864 

=4,358 
=224 

=3,061 

2,081 

=980 

37,900 

5,963 

475 

158 
33, 165 



^7, 949,606 

7,917,123 

^32,483 



50,057 
17,241 

1,643 
14,413 

7,630,431 

5,302,044 

4,953,034 

349,010 

1,103,100 

1,225,287 

619,386 

63,094 
542,807 

^269, 118 
236,635 
^32,483 

4,276 
1,186 
3,090 

505 
385 
120 

^40,967 

29,931 

^11,036 

23,504 

^64,126 
57,877 
^6,249 

55,510 
2,367 

^10,473 
^1,919 

^6,169 

3,684 

^2,485 

133,901 

16,666 

2,708 

1,121 
^14,254' 



%535,5Q5 

"1,535,457 
^^48 



2,710 
1,389 

137 
827 

1,503,636 
1^20,424 
1,1S6,M3 
124,231 

65,420 

117,792 

75,923 

5,216 
36,653 

*29,159 

29,111 

-^48 

113 
65 
48 

23 

21 

2 

(NA) 

2,847 

(NA) 



2,485 

(NA) 

6,599 

(NA) 



6,429 
170 

■^705 
425 

(NA) 
595 
(NA) 

18,251 

1,705 

61 

37 
"^607 



225,433 

223,679 

^1,754 



4,313 
806 

145 
1,622 

206, 611 

103,867 

100,424 

3,443 

12,837 
89,907 

4^,180 

j-45,727 

14, 509 
12,755 
^1,754 

472 

V 472 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,415 

(NA) 

4,362 

(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

648 

164 

^484 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

67 
(NA) 



'5,226,592 

^5,209,798 
16,794 



=40,764 
12,383 

881 
11, 637 

4,968,271 

3,856,800 

3,646,660 

210, 140 

«293,186 
818,285 
412,554 

405,731 

217,557 

200, 763 

16,794 

2,072 

2,072 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

10,507 

(NA) 

31,460 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

3,935 
1,803 
2,132 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

354 
(NA) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. 

NA Not available. 

■^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

=For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations In manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased 
machinery installed. 

■'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the number of production and 
development workers was estijnated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same 
figures are included for production and development workers and for all employees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts. Includes 
the estimated value of minerals produced and used in the same manufacturing establishment. 

'^Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes figures for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 

*For 1954, no data were obtained on the cost of gas received for processing or on the value of residue gas. However, the estimated value, prior to 
processing, of such gas was used in computing value added in mining. 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS HI 

West South Central 

Tabic 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



10 & 

12 

1051 

1211 

13 
1311 



1321 
138 
1381 
1382 

1389 



i<; 

1421 



1441 



147 



Industry group and industry 



All mineral industries 

^tetal mining and Bituminous coal 

and lignite mining 

Bauxite 

Bituminous coal 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 

Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services 

Drilling oil and gas wells 

Oil and gas exploration 

services 

Oil and gas field services, 
nee 

Nonjnetallic minerals mining 

Crushed and broken stone 

Crushed and broken limestone. 

Sand and gravel 

Common sand and gravel 

Chemical and fertilizer 

minerals 

Rock salt 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Total 



3,293,941 



13,309 
3,607 

4,622 

3,202,245 

1,967,863 

1,804,922 

162,941 

728,473 
505,909 
294,039 

20,266 

191,604 

78,387 
13,028 
10,294 

21,100 
20,236 



37,900 
5,963 



Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 



1,127,398 



7,099 
^1,849 

3,382 

1,070,263 

670,203 

606,593 

63,610 

39,633 
360,447 
195,655 

14,000 

150,792 

50,016 
9,766 
8,061 

^15,553 
^14,864 



^21,692 
4,458 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 



634,542 



2,114 



630,975 

XXX 
XXX 
XXX 

630,975 

XXX 
XXX 

XXX 



1,453 
27 

20 






(') 



Con- 
tract 
work 



1,067,056 



1,577 
290 

784 

1,056,074 

977,401 

908,131 

69,270 

33,320 
45,353 
35,162 

1,905 

8,286 

9,405 
360 
202 

1,016 
1,013 



7,477 
36 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



464,945 



2,519 
1,468 

456 

444,913 

320,259 

290,198 

30,061 

24,545 

100,109 

63,222 

4,361 

32,526 

17,513 
2,875 
2,011 

4,531 
4,359 



8,731 
1,469 



Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 



2,710 
1,389 

827 

1,503,636 
1,320,424 
1,196,193 
124,231 

65,420 

117,792 

75,923 

5,216 

36,653 

29,111 
2,847 
2,485 

6,599 
6,429 



18,251 
1,705 



De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



737,804 



169 

(D) 

107 

737,326 

726,806 

664,852 

61,954 

XXX 

10,520 
10,433 



87 

309 
31 

31 



87 



174 
9 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 



797,653 



2,541 
(D) 

720 

766,310 

593,618 

531,341 

62,277 

65,420 

107,272 

65,490 

5,216 

36,566 

28,802 
2,816 
2,454 

6,510 
6,342 



18,077 
1,696 



Net shipments of primary products^ 



By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



XXX 

1,361 
2,047 

XXX 
XXX 

*1,393,618 
^869,894 

^213,630 

XXX 
XXX 

XXX 

XXX 

XXX 

23,112 
18,226 

45,927 
45,062 



XXX 

■'1,585 



($1,000) 



XXX 

16,599 
14,354 

XXX 

5,268,830 

4,364,633 

236,154 

506,431 

XXX 

'609,118 

■^ 62, 194 

■^489, 720 

XXX 

28,919 
22,748 

■"61,580 
■^559,100 



XXX 

■^14,638 



By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 



Juantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



XXX 

XXX 

■^46,494 
^5,807 ,064 



XXX 

XXX 

XXX 
XXX 
XXX 

'8,428 
'8,379 

'6,826 
'6,856 



XXX 



Value 



($1,000) 



XXX 

36,540 
142,031 
662,555 



XXX 

C) 
C) 
C) 

XXX 

'13,371 
'13,286 



(') 



XXX 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

■""Represents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

^The cost of minerals received for preparation is included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

^Represents thousands of barrels of crude petroleum, field condensate, and drips shipped or used. 

'Represents millions of cubic feet of natural gas shipped . 

^Represents net shipments of natural gas liquids only. The quantity is in thousands of barrels. 

''Figures for primary products or services produced or performed in other industries are included with those for primary products or services 
produced or performed in the specified industry. 

'includes less than 40 thousand tons of stone other than limestone used in making cement. 

'includes figures for minerals produced and used in the same establishment in making manufactured products. The value of such minerals was 
estimated . 



112 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
West South Central 



Table 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group or Industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



MJ-ning only 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods ^ 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 
rately 
oper- 
ated 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 



Nonp re- 
ducing 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 



10 



105 



1211 



13 



131 



132 



14 



U2 



All establishments: 

Number of establishments.... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Metal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining $1,000. 

Bauxite : 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining .. $1 , 000 . 

Bitximlnous coal: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining $1,000. 

Oil and gas extraction: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining $1,000. 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added In 
mining $1,000. 

Natural gas liquids: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Nonmetalllc minerals mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining.. . .$1,000. 



Crushed and broken stone: 

Number of establishments 

Number of einployees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Crushed and broken limestone: 
Number of establishments.... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

144 Sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

See footnotes at end of table. 



6,711 
139,847 

5,319,963 



79 
(D) 
(D) 



18 

632 

15,023 



60 

1,059 

10,618 



6,012 

124,314 

5,094,652 



5,625 
112,039 

4,654,605 



387 
12,275 

440,047 



557 

12,821 

186,359 



82 
2,372 

19,750 



57 
1,901 



15,695 



354 
4,414 

43,376 



6,478 
139,286 

5,330, 111 



59 
(D) 
(D) 



17 
(D) 
(D) 



59 
(D) 
(D) 



5,811 
(D) 
(D) 



5,425 
111,645 

4,664,108 



386 
(D) 

(D) 



546 

12,718 

184,002 



79 
(D) 

(D) 



56 
(D) 

15,695 



5,652 
(D) 

(D) 



39 
(D) 
(D) 



11 
(D) 
(D) 



33 
(D) 
(D) 



5,425 

111,645 

4,664,108 



5,425 
1U,645 

4,664,108 



353 
(D) 

(D) 



153 
(D) 
(D) 



75 
463 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



95 
338 

3,340 



38 
(D) 

(D) 



18 
(D) 
(D) 



3 
(D) 
(D) 



20 
183 
983 



142 
(D) 

(D) 



19 
(D) 
(D) 



7 

211 

3,864 



13 
(D) 
(D) 



108 

559 

4,693 



75 
463 



2 

(D) 



(D) 



62 
253 

2,325 



5,472 
115,248 

4,766,580 



2 

(D) 
(D) 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



5,425 

111,645 

4,664,108 



5,425 
111,645 

4,664,108 



45 
(D) 
(D) 



417 
10,131 

103,649 



13 
(D) 
(D) 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



25 

818 

9,130 



378 

8,628 

83,565 



68 
(D) 



(D) 



52 
(D) 

(D) 



258 
(D) 

(D) 



19 

1,002 

9,885 



3 
(D) 
(D) 



10 

403 

2,612 



6 
(D) 
(D) 



2 

(D) 

.(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



322 
7,492 

76,587 



10 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



15 

415 

6,518 



296 

6,410 

59,309 



66 
2,203 

18,330 



50 
1,811 

14,732 



185 
3,212 

29,937 



76 
1,637 

17,177 



76 

1,637 

17,177 



73 
(D) 

(D) 



409 
(D) 

(D) 



386 
(D) 

(D) 



15 
(D) 
(D) 



35 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



233 
561 

(3) 



7 
(D) 
(D) 


20 
(D) 
(D) 


5 
(D) 
(D) 


1 
(D) 
(D) 


1 
(D) 
(D) 


1 
(D) 
(D) 


386 
(D) 
(D) 


201 
(D) 

(D) 


... 


200 
394 



C) 



1 

(D) 
(D) 



11 

103 

2,357 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
West South Central 



113 



Table 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958-Continued 

(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 





Industry group or industry 
and item 


All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 


Producing establishments 






Total 


Mining only 


Mines with preparation plants 


Sepa- 
rately 
oper- 
ated 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 


Nonp re- 
ducing 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 


Ind. 
code 


Total 


Under- 
ground 
mines 


Open- 
pit 
mines 


Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods^ 


Total 


Under- 
ground 
mines 


Open- 
pit 
mines 


Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 


14 
U7 


Nonmetallic minerals mining — 
Continued 
Chemical and fertilizer minerals: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 


41 
4,804 

114,252 

5 
807 

12,408 


36 
(D) 

(D) 

5 
807 

12,408 


12 
(D) 

(D) 


... 




12 
(D) 

(D) 


12 
1,241 

17,645 

5 
807 

12,408 


4 
522 

6,537 

3 
(D) 

(D) 


5 
(D) 

(D) 


3 
(D) 

(D) 

2 

(D) 

(D) 


12 

140 

2,662 


5 
(D) 

(D) 


1476 


Value added In 
mining $1,000. . 

Rock salt: 

Number of establishments 

Niimber nf empl nypp55 ^ ^ ^ ^ 




Value added in 
miTiing $1,000. . 


... 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

'■Includes data for 30 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
^Includes data for 19 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 

^Not shown since the cost of supplies purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded capital 
expenditures . 



Table 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, by Counties: 1958 and 1954 

(For county statistics, see table 3 of the Individual State Reports) 



114 MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 

West South Central 
Table 4.-Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group; 1958 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Gold and silver ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 Metal mining services 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 
120 Bituminous coal and lignite 



12c Coal mining services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

141 Dimension stone 

141M Dimension stone in manufactures 

142 Crushed and broken stone 

142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 
144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel in manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonmetallic minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c, in 

manufactures 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


Division and size 
class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108 


109 


120 


12c 


131 


132 


138 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148 


149 


149 
M 


West South Central, 

total 

No employees 

1-4 employees 

5-9 employees 

10-19 employees... 

20-49 employees... 
50-99 employees. .. 
100-249 employees. 
250-499 employees. 


10,216 

886 

4,502 

1,500 

1,410 

1,250 

405 

174 

44 

23 

17 

5 


10,062 

878 

4,417 

1,478 

1,393 

1,231 

404 

172 

44 

23 

17 

5 


154 

8 

85 

22 

17 

19 
1 
2 


6 

2 

1 

2 

1 


1 
1 


26 
4 
9 

10 
2 

1 


2 
1 

1 


18 
1 
6 
2 

1 

6 
2 


19 
2 
7 
4 
2 

2 
2 


2 

1 

1 


7 
7 


63 

13 

21 

7 

6 

11 
2 
2 

1 


4 
2 

"i 
1 


5,625 

713 

3,036 

708 

542 

329 

126 

66 

27 

14 

11 

3 


387 3,335 

4 93 

29 1,067 

48 611 

93 649 

154 617 
47 198 
12 70 
... 14 
... 8 

6 

2 


27 
6 
9 

6 
3 

3 


15 

*5 
2 
2 

5 

1 


82 
2 

19 

9 

14 

25 

10 

3 


18 

i 
1 
7 

9 
... 


354 
28 

126 
62 
64 

63 
9 
2 


18 

"9 
2 
3 

2 

1 
1 


28 
2 
5 

3 
7 

9 
2 


97 

8 

70 

16 

2 

1 


41 

"s 

2 

6 

5 
4 
13 
2 
1 


10 

"7 
2 

1 


25 
6 
7 

1 
3 

5 
3 


6 

1 
3 

2 


500-999 employees. 






































1,000-2,499 em- 
ployees 






































2,500 employees 
and over 






































































I 

















MOUNTAIN 



115 



116 



CD 



oo 
tr> 
cr> 

»— I 
I 

CSJ 

<^ 
1—1 

■ ■ 

CO 



O 
CD 



CD 




E Z 

i < 



(300 



-12 




o 

UJ 

o 
o 



o 

O 



in 



O 
m 



m 

CM 



< 

a. 

UJ 

O 



SQNVSnOHl Nl 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
Mountain 



117 



Tabic 1.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations; 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 



Kind of operation 
and yeeir 



Establish- 
ments, 
number 



To- 
tal 



20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploj^- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 
added 

in 
mining 



($1,000) 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
In- 
stalled 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ■' 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



Energy used 

(kwh 
equivalent) 



Total 

(mil- 
lion) 



Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 



Mineral industries 
only: 

1958 

1954 



Including operations 
in manufactures: 
All operations: 
1958 , 



1954'.. 
1939*.. 
1919^°. 
1909^°. 
1902^2. 



3,803 
4,551 



3,916 
4,6L2 
^P51 
1,948 
4,378 
%636 



Excluding oil and 
gas extraction 
industries : 

1958 

1954' 

1939* 

1929^' 

1919^° 

1909^' 



2,316 
3,194 
"1,861 
1,551 
1,882 
4,333 
1902^'' I'4,619 



566 
556 



574 
561 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



299 
295 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



84, 
84, 



,958 
662 



85,806 
85,066 
74,096 
91,738 
97,694 
67,507 



61,170 
62, 549 
68,044 
88,572 
89,272 
97,534 
67, ■'37 



463,478 
393,746 



467,344 
395,178 
111,751 
151,338 
100,088 
67,087 



64,732 
68,713 



65,575 
69,1141 
66,711 
84,708 
91,775 
^61,711 



323,833 



287, 
101, 
154, 



,666 
,286 
,720 



49 
52, 



548 
557 



147,013 
99,925 
66,934 



61,756 
82,517 
82,356 
91,632 
"61,564 



128,802 
140,458 



130,461 

141,253 

129,846 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



96,582 
107,158 
122,828 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



329,888 
301,851 



333,739 

303,275 

93,717 

136,053 

90,578 

59,350 



250,751 

230,646 

85,753 

137,695 

132,251 

90,432 

59,240 



1,745,655 
^1,305,463 



1,770,199 

^1,313,850 

283,834 

231,748 

126,770 

86,118 



796,237 
^667,368 
226,574 
311,733 
214,940 
126,751 
85,712 



^436,182 
312, 



%88,677 
' ,363 



916*140 



315,021 
256,342 



^439,627 
'314,283 
64,167 
80,157 
57,358 
24,304 



^263,655 
^187, 503 
60,528 
82,784 
75,440 
57,080 
24,235 



288,677 

*140,363 

(NA) 

6,254 

15,606 

(NA) 



•215,362 

^134, 981 

(NA) 

(NA) 

6,180 

15,606 

(NA) 



*315,027 

%56,353 

13,242 

3,667 

5,320 

2,124 



*1j09,400 
'74,211 
1,906 
5,136 
2,894 
5,280 
2,114 



142,625 
128,584 



^42,670 
%28,606 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



'61,730 
^*54,671 
(NA) 
19,711 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,447,655 
^,768,451 



2,475,644 
^1,778, 236 
361,243 
321,826 
205,054 
112,546 



1,267,281 
3997, 903 
289,008 
399,653 
299,454 
204,717 
112,061 



480,505 
364,677 



*480,556 
^364,679 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



^79,103 
^''•11(1336 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



46,449 
38,360 



*46,451 

*38,361 

18,846 

^^16,318 

(NA) 

(NA) 



718 
558 



708 
555 
282 
193 
(NA) 
(NA) 



*19, 477 


393 


^16,716 


318 


15,810 


256 


13,405 


162 


^^1^ 278 
(NA) 
(NA) 


186 
(NA) 
(NA) 



NA Not available. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. Includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of shipments (or production for 1919 and 
1909) and contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for preparation. The approximate magni- 
tude of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other years, represents net production 
and excludes this duplication. For years prior to 1958, excludes the value of residue gas from natural gas liquids plants. 

Figures for minerals received for preparation in Nevada are included with those for supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and 
electricity. For "Including operations in manufactures," see also footnote 5. 
■'Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry, 

Excludes the cost of natural gas processed at natural gas liquid plants, but includes the estimated value prior to processing of natural gas liquids 
contained in such gas. See also footnote 3. 

'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is in- 
cluded with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

'Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

''Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments and, except for number of establishments, excludes data for one 
dimension sandstone quarry and dressing plant and for one common clay pit in New Mexico. 

'Excludes, in part, data for'dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction with quarries. 

^Represents number of mines and quarries, number of natural gas liquids plants, and, for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services 
industries, number of operating companies. 

l°Exoludes data for sand and gravel operations and for stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime plants. For 1929, there were 18 such 
sand and gravel establishments, with products valued at $1,596 thousand and 13 such stone operations. See also footnote ^5. 

i^Excludes purchased electricity. For "All operations" in 1939, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to 7 percent of the total kwh equiva- 
lent of energy used; and for "Excluding oil and gas extraction Industries" in 1929, to 9 percent. . ^ ^ a ^ ^,+= <-„^ 
"Includes data for lime plants and for 2 cement plants; the value of lime produced in 5 of the Mountain States was $229 thousand. Excludes data for 
sand and gravel and clay mining operations and for stone quarries at other cement plants. 

l^Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 
l*Includes data for 7 establishments primarily engaged in building, repairing, or dismantling rigs and derricks. See also footnote 6. 
^'Excludes data for common clay and shale operations. In 1939, there were 27 such mining operations with products valued at about $190 thousand. 
l«Except for number of establishments, includes data for 11 nonproducing oil and gas extraction establishments in Montana, Wyoming, Colorado, and 
Arizona. See also footnote 10. . , ^ i. r, 

^'Except for number of establishments, includes data for 2 companies in Wyoming prijnarily engaged in producing crude petroleum, and for 3 companies 
in Colorado primarily engaged in producing natural gas. See also footnote 12. 



118 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
Mountain 



Table 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Industry group and industry 



Total 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All employees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



51,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery In- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



19 5A^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures. . , 



10 

1011 

102, 

103', i 

104 

106 

1062 

1069 

108 

1081 

1082 

109 
109-4 

12 

1211 

13 

1311 



1321 
138 
1381 
1382 

1389 



14 



1421 



1441 



145 



1459 

147 

1473 
1475 
149 

1492 
1495 
1499 



Metal mining 

Iron ores 

1 Copper lead,' zinc, gold, and 
f silver ores 

Ferroalloy ores: 

Manganese ores 

Ferroalloy ores, nee 

Metal mining services 

Metal mining stripping 
services 

Metal mining services, nee... 

Miscellaneous metal ores: 

Uranium-radixim-vanadlum ores . 

Bituminous coal and lignite mining 
Bituminous coal 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 

Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services 

Drilling oil and gas wells... 
Oil and gas exploration 

services 

Oil and gas field services, 
nee 

Nonmetalllc minerals mining 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures 1 

Dimension stone 

Dimension stone, nee 

Mineral subindustry 

Crushed and broken stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures... 

Crushed and broken limestone 

(mineral subindustry only) . . 

Crushed and broken stone, nee 

(mineral subindustry only) . . 

Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry 

Included in manxifactures. . . 
Common sand and gravel 

(mineral subindustry only) . . 
Glass sand and molding sand. . 
Clay and related minerals 

(mineral industries only) 

Fire clay 

Clay and related 

minerals , nee 

Mineral Industry 

Included in manufactures... 
Chemical and fertilizer 

minerals 

Fluorspar 

Phosphate rock 

Miscellaneous minerals, nee 

(mineral industries only) 

Gypsum (mineral industry only) 

Pumice and pumlclte 

Nonmetalllc minerals , nee , , , . 



3,916 

3,803 

113 

1,394 
29 

537 

123 
12 
64 

20 
44 

548 

221 
203 

1,600 

1,001 

903 

98 

53 

546 

264 



214 

701 
588 
113 
47 
42 
34 
90 
69 
21 

35 

28 
283 
227 

56 

218 
9 

70 
18 

32 

15 
17 

72 

19 

9 

97 
10 
27 
29 



574 
566 



175 



70 

15 

5 

13 

4 
7 

58 

48 
47 

275 

114 

103 

11 

22 

139 

95 

10 

34 

76 



85,806 

84,958 

3 848 

44,680 
938 

30,597 

1,504 
2,209 
1,341 

371 
970 

7,609 

5,735 
5,666 

24,636 
14,501 
12,718 
1,783 
1,205 
8,930 
5,946 

810 

2,174 

10,755 

9,907 

%48 

116 

97 

73 

1,062 

874 

^188 

483 

353 
2,346 
1 869 

^477 

1,813 
56 

670 
353 

137 

98 

339 

5,106 
241 
653 

1,075 

67 

114 

599 



467,344 

463,478 

^3,866 

238,238 
5,384 

161,290 

7,113 

11,901 

7,615 

1,610 
6,005 



42,658 

28,744 
28,429 

143,511 
89,686 
80,506 
9,180 
7,151 
46,674 
32,932 

4,071 

9,671 

56,851 

52,985 

33,866 

340 

270 

205 

5,705 

4,798 

^907 

2,487 

2,144 
11,438 

9,171 
^2,267 

8,895 
276 



3,251 
^199 



599 

438 

3l61 

29,419 
1,227 
3,394 

5,050 
332 
450 

2,656 



65,575 

64,732 

^843 

35,721 
724 

24,234 

1,284 
1,775 
1,203 

354 
849 



6,121 

5,005 
4,946 

16,027 
7,121 
5,864 
1,257 
1,055 
7,851 
5,213 

703 

1,935 

8,822 

7,979 

3843 

104 

87 

66 

927 

739 

3l88 

402 

304 
2,061 
1,584 

^477 

1,536 
48 



545 
351 



127 

88 

339 

3,959 
219 
554 

877 

60 

101 

483 



130,461 

128,802 

1,659 

71,164 
1,337 

47,391 

2,514 
3,274 
2,629 

699 
1,930 



13,286 

7,915 
7,818 

33,879 
14, 172 
11,760 
2,412 
2,128 
17,579 
11,618 

1,726 

4,235 

17,503 

15,84A 

1,659 

195 

154 

121 

1,839 

1,463 

376 

762 

627 
4,230 
3,276 

954 

3,176 
100 

1,144- 
102 

252 

174 
78 

7,648 

480 

1,086 

1,808 
121 
192 

1,063 



333,739 

329,888 

3,851 

182,693 
3,883 

123,015 

5,704 
8,590 
6,686 

1,527 
5,159 



33,078 

24,190 
23,941 

82,988 
38,005 
32,083 
5,922 
6,247 
38,736 
27,230 

3,266 

8,240 

43,868 

40,017 

3,851 

297 

232 

177 

4,707 

3,800 

907 

1,819 

1,837 
9,833 
7,566 
2,267 

7,341 
225 

2,521 

193 

547 
386 
161 

21,491 
1,053 
2,733 

3,616 
289 
398 

1,938 



1,770,199 

1,745,655 

24,544 

570, 739 
27,732 

304,824 



14,307 
36,874 
15,329 

6,460 



48,790 
48,051 

973,962 
841,883 
788,708 
53,175 
39,408 
92,671 
65,355 

8,167 

19,149 

176,708 

152,164 

24,54/. 

694 

586 

476 

17,318 

10,371 

6,947 

4,612 

5,537 
43,303 
30,507 
12,796 

29,979 
528 

12,863 

778 

1,904 

659 

1,245 

83,438 
4,640 
7,138 

12,448 

871 
1,995 

5,317 



-1,186,001 

1,182,505 

^3,496 

550,203 
5,811 

254,499 

14,716 

13,194 

6,918 

1,829 
5,089 



252,950 

37,441 
36,899 

535,854 
384,139 
317,078 
67,061 
92,596 
59,119 
46,002 

5,692 

7,425 

2 62, 503 

59,007 

23, 496 

342 

271 

125 

=7,048 

6,162 

^886 

3,653 

2,270 

210,094 

8,439 

=1,655 

8,134 
305 



^151 

2 872 

689 

=183 

29,507 
1,828 

5,113 

8,145 
323 
817 

5,210 



'2,475,644 

2,447,655 

^27,989 

968,300 
32,019 

511,418 

27,718 
46,325 
21,269 

7,535 
13,734 

324,039 

78,062 
77,040 

1,208,363 
951,170 
896,491 
54,679 
116,952 
140,241 
102,928 

12,902 

24,411 

^220, 919 

192,930 

^27,989 

869 

708 

497 

^21,646 

13,813 

37,833 

6,152 

7,213 

349,670 

35,219 

314,451 

34,447 
772 



16,721 



32,609 

1,181 

3l,428 

107,357 

6,031 

11,268 

16,767 
1,044 
2,580 
7,646 



■^480,556 

480,505 

Si 

152,642 
1,524 

47,905 



1,305 

3,743 

978 

754 
224 



96,468 

8,169 
7,910 

301,453 

274,852 

209,295 

65,557 

15,052 

11,549 

8,429 

957 

2,163 

■^18,292 
18,241 
^51 
167 
149 
104 
(NA) 
2,720 
(NA) 

2,113 

594 

3,727 
(NA) 

3,666 

61 

2,040 
*63 



(NA) 
167 
(NA) 

5,588 
437 
983 

3,826 
150 
232 

2,881 



85,066 

84,662 

3404 

45,403 
(NA) 

(NA) 

1,826 

(NA) 

2,067 

(NA) 
(NA) 

3,337 

7,665 
7,449 

22,517 

12,167 

11,418 

749 

1,007 

9,343 

6,265 



,3,078 



9,481 
9 077 
3404 
194 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

368 

(NA) 

(NA) 

1,597 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



34 
364 

(NA) 
(NA) 
701 

(NA) 

92 

98 

465 



5 1,313,850 

'1,305,463 

8,387 

'504, 531 
(NA) 

(NA) 

13,513 

(NA) 

18,667 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
49,936 

646,437 

529,746 

509,387 

20,359 

^35,023 

81,668 

59,474 



22,194 



(NA) 
(NA) 
8,387 
968 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

3,207 

(NA) 

(NA) 

16,392 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

1,329 
357 
972 

(NA) 

(NA) 

6,469 

(NA) 
1,372 
1,414 
4,899 



NA Not available. -"-Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. =For crushed and broken stone, sand 
and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machinery installed. 3For crushed 
and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the number of production and development workers 
was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same figures are included 
for production and development workers and for all employees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used In the same establishment at such operations. ^Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and 
gypsum mining operations In manufacturing establishments. ^Excludes figures for the Uranlum-Radlum-Vanadlum Ores Industry. ^For 1954, no data 
were obtained on the cost of gas received for processing or on the value of residue gas at natural gas liquids plants. However, the estimated value, 
prior to processing, of liquids contained in such gas was used in confuting value added in mining. 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
Mountain 



119 



Tabic 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group and industry 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Total 



Supplies^ 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



Capital expenditures 
(*1,000) 



De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 



Net shipments of primary products^ 



By establish- 
ments classified 
In the Industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral Industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



10 

lOU 

102, 

103, 

&104 

106 

1062 

1069 

108 
1081 

1082 

109 
1094 

12 

1211 

13 
1311 



1321 

138 

1381 

1382 

1389 



1-; 

14-21 



1441 

145 
147 

1473 
1475 

149 
1499 



} 



All mineral industries. 



Metal mining. 
Iron ores. . 



Copper lead, zinc, gold, and 
silver ores 



Ferroalloy ores: 

Manganese ores 

Ferroalloy ores, nee 

Metal mining services 

Metal mining stripping 
services 

Metal mining services, nee... 

Miscellaneous metal ores: 

Uranium-radium-vanadium ores. 

Bituminous coal and lignite mining 
'Bituminous coal 



Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 



Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services... 
Drilling oil and gas wells. 
Oil & gas exploration 

services 

Oil and gas field services, 

nee , 



Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Crushed and broken stone 

Crushed and broken limestone 
Crushed and broken stone, neo , 



Sand and gravel 

Ccmmon sand and gravel . . 

Clay and related minerals. 

Chemical and fertilizer 

minerals 

Fluorspar 

Phosphate rock 



Miscellaneous minerals, nee. 
Nonmetallic minerals, nee. 



1,182,505 

550,203 

5,811 



254,499 

14,716 
13,194 

6,918 

1,829 
5,089 

252,950 

37,4^-1 
36,899 

535,854 

384,139 

317,078 

67,061 

92,596 

59,119 
46,002 

5,692 

7,425 

59,007 
6,162 
3,653 
2,270 

8,439 
8,134 

5,898 

29,507 
1,828 
5,113 

8,145 
5,210 



^436,182 

196,932 
*2,008 



111,018 



^^11,370 
9,133 

5,580 

962 
4,618 



61,963 

*26,968 
'^26,694 

175,972 

128,041 

95,390 

32,651 

6,467 

41,464 
32,749 

3,690 

5,025 

38,893 
3,498 
1,553 
1,728 

^^6,751 
^6,766 

*3,941 

^^20,798 
"^1,098 
"^2,755 

V,035 
^^2,151 



'288,677 

212,063 
(*) 

100,906 



(*) 



XXX 
XXX 



105,300 



73,315 

XXX 
XXX 
XXX 

73,315 

XXX 
XXX 



716 
13 
13 

(^) 
(*) 

C^) 

(*) 



315,021 

97,965 
3,027 

22,258 



2,552 
3,428 

368 



121 
247 

66,308 

5,088 
5,074 

205,627 

192,657 

162,497 

30,160 

4,698 

8,272 
6,858 

1,103 

311 

6,341 

481 

84 

388 

470 
317 

985 



3,169 

494 

1,875 

1,091 
573 



142,625 

43,243 
776 

20,317 



794 
633 

970 

746 
224 



19,379 

5,385 
5,131 

80,940 

63,44-1 

59,191 

4,250 

8,116 

9,383 
6,395 

899 

2,089 

13,057 

2,170 

2,003 

154 

1,218 
1,051 

972 



5,540 
236 
483 

3,019 
2,486 



480,505 

152,642 
1,524 



47,905 

1,305 
3,743 

978 

754 
224 

96,468 

8,169 
7,910 

301,453 

274,852 

209,295 

65,557 

15,052 

11,549 
8,429 

957 

2,163 

18,241 

2,720 

2,113 

594 

3,727 
3,666 

2,040 

5,588 
437 
983 

3,826 
2,881 



181,986 

29,004 
706 



11,463 



217 
743 



15,827 

444- 
394 

150,701 

150,114 

113,667 

36,447 



587 
584 



1,837 
57 
57 

70 
67 

138 



1,162 
194 
330 

398 
139 



298,519 

123,638 
818 



36,442 

1,088 
3,000 

978 

754 
224 

80,641 

7,725 
7,516 

150,752 

124,738 

95,628 

29,110 

15,052 

10,962 
7,845 

957 

2,160 

16,404 

2,663 

2,056 

594 

3,657 
3,599 

1,902 

4,426 
243 
653 

3,428 
2,742 



XXX 

54, 642 
^85,461 



7l,138 

XXX 



XXX 
XXX 

*5,272 

XXX 

10,394 

XXX 
XXX 

*301,543 
^92,325 

^°22,633 

XXX 
XXX 



XXX 

14,189 

2,686 

11,368 

47,205 
46,791 



XXX 

^1,859 

XXX 
XXX 



XXX 

32,010 



''26,178 

XXX 

(D) 

(D) 
(D) 

(D) 

XXX 

62,996 

XXX 

948,573 

845,14^ 

46,641 

^"45,386 

XXX 

^^102,409 
^^11,956 
1^23,801 

XXX 

13,031 
5,581 
7,144 

^^8,001 
^^7,210 



XXX 

(D) 
9,000 

XXX 

(D) 



XXX 



XXX 

XXX 

(MA) 

XXX 



XXX 
XXX 

83,277 

'557,445 



XXX 
XXX 



XXX 

124,712 

1=4,478 



1^267 

1=11,992 
1=11,987 



XXX 
XXX 



XXX 
XXX 



XXX 

(D) 

(D) 
(D) 



(D) 



XXX 

2,751 

9,314 

50,225 



XXX 

(") 
(") 
(^^) 



XXX 

1=8,003 

1=7.835 

1=227 



(") 
(1^) 



XXX 

(MA) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. 

iRepresents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

■'Figures for minerals received for preparation in Nevada are included with those for supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and 
electricity. 

^Figures for the cost of minerals received for preparation are included with figures for the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased 
fuels and electricity. ~^ 

^Represents thousands of long tons. 

^Represents crude ore mined in the specified industries. The figure for copper, lead, zinc, gold, and silver ores excludes placer gravels handled 
in recovering placer gold and silver. 

''Figures for shipments of primary products by establishments classified in other industries are included with those for shipments by establishments 
classified in the specified industry. The quantity figure represents thousands of long tons of crude ore mined. The value figure represents gross 
shipnents. 

^Represents thousands of barrels of crude petroleum, field condensate, and drips shipped or used, 

'Represents millions of cubic feet of natural gas shipped. 
i°Represents natural gas liquids only. The quantity figure is in thousands of barrels. 

iiFigures for primary products shipped or services performed in other industries are Included with those for primary products shipped or services 
performed in the specified industry. For Sand and Gravel and for Common Sand and Gravel, see also footnote 12. 

l=Includes minerals produced and used in the same establishment in making manufactured products. The value of such minerals was estimated. 



120 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
Mountain 



Table 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 



(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry ^oup or Industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Mining only 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods ■'■ 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



oepa- 
rately 
oper- 
ated 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 



Nonp re- 
ducing 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 



10 



1011 



102, 
103, 



1062 



1069 



109-; 



12 



1211 



1311 



1321 



All establishments: 

Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Metal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining, .$1,000. . 

Iron ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

I Copper, lead, zinc, gold, and 
r silver ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Manganese ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. , 

Ferroalloy ores, nee: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Uranium-radium-vanadium ores : 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 



1 Bituminous coal and lignite mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. .$1,000. . 

Bituminous coal: 

Nximber of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Oil and gas extraction: 

Number of establishments 

Number of einployees 

Value added in mining. .$1,000. . 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Natural gas liquids: 

Number of establishments 

Nxmiber of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 



3,171 
7<i,'i05 

1,635,093 



1,330 

43,339 

555,410 



29 
938 



27 732 



537 
30,597 

304,824 



123 
1,504 

14,307 



12 
2,209 

36,874 



548 

7,609 



215 

5,693 

48,248 



203 
5,666 

48,051 



1,054 

15,706 

881,291 



1,001 
14,501 



841,883 



53 
1,205 

39,408 



2,575 
72,365 

1,646,981 



946 

42,139 

557,920 



26 
938 

28,263 



309 
29,846 

306,609 



111 
1,479 

14,333 



1,877 
29,218 

1,067,927 



759 

14,061 

194,325 



23 
(D) 



5 
(D) 

(D) 



439 
7,399 

168,020 



214 
(D) 
(D) 



202 
(D) 

(D) 



862 
(D) 
(D) 



810 
13,671 

851,286 



52 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 



208 
9,228 

(D) 



76 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



410 

3,103 

74,707 



85 
(D) 
(D) 



75 
289 

1,612 



810 

13,671 

851,286 



810 
13,671 

851,286 



612 
6,928 

101,934 



522 

6,550 

99,499 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



150 
3,012 

28,373 



21 
661 

5,357 



334 
2,574 

62,958 



76 

263 

1,595 



70 
250 

1,541 



413 
5,575 

93,630 



219 
4,£ 

76,777 



22 
588 

24,158 



53 
3,743 

42,046 



53 

141 

1,583 



1 
(D) 

(D) 

68 
299 

8,786 



9 
(D) 
(D) 



852 

16,715 

872,363 



18 

2,703 

18,049 



5 
2,473 

(D) 



2 

(D) 



(D) 



230 
2,963 



810 

13,671 

851,286 



810 
13,671 

851,286 



596 
34,931 

474,507 



149 

21,235 

300,977 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



89 
16,432 

(D) 



31 
(D) 

(D) 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



10 
1,773 

61,326 



126 

5,356 

46,220 



124 
(D) 

(D) 



195 
20,801 

235,687 



58 

11,182 

118,623 



350 

12,070 

187,806 



78 

8,525 

137,277 



43 

8,471 



69,288 



9 

(D) 

(D) 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



5 
615 



17,425 



108 

5,026 

42,245 



108 
5,026 

42,245 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



41 
7,860 

(D) 



22 

310 



4,818 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



15 

280 

3,692 



13 
(D) 

(D) 



51 
2,060 

51,014 



13 

1,528 

45,077 



5 
101 



681 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



3 

50 

283 



283 



102 
8,216 



38 

6,893 

62,618 



12 
4,186 

28,403 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



19 
2,523 

31,987 



3 

33 
341 



341 



52 
(D) 
(D) 



52 
(D) 

(D) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
Mountain 



121 



Tabic 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958-Continued 



(For explanation of lliie and column captions see Introduction) 



Industry ^roup or industry 
and item 



(joninetailic minerals mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. . .$1,000., 

Crushed and broken stone: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Crushed and broken limestone: 
Number of establishments.... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. , 

Crushed and broken stone, nee: 
Number of establishments . . . . 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
lIl^Tl^T1g $1,000.. 

Sand and gravel: 

' Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000.. 

Ccanmon sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments.... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Clay and related minerals: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Chemical and fertilizer 
minerals: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Fluorspar: 

Number of establishments.... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000., 

Phosphate rock: 

Number of establishments . , . . 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000.. 



Miscellaneous minerals, nee: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Nonmetallic minerals, nee: 
Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



572 

9,667 

150, I'M 

69 
87<; 

10,371 

'35 
A83 

4,612 

28 
353 

5,537 

227 
1,869 

30,507 

218 
1,813 

29,979 

70 
670 

12,863 



72 
5,106 



83,438 



19 
241 

4,640 

9 
653 

7,138 

97 
1,075 

12,448 



29 
599 



5,317 



Producing establishments 



Total 



553 
(D) 
(D) 

68 
(D) 

(D) 



35 
483 

4,612 

27 
(D) 

(D) 



227 
1,869 

30,507 

218 
1,813 

29,979 



660 
12,857 



64 
5,075 



83,311 



14 
237 

4,646 

9 
653 

7,138 

91 
1,056 

12,447 



27 
(D) 

(D) 



Mining only 



Total 



223 
(D) 
(D) 

17 
62 

677 

7 
37 



(D) 
(D) 

67 
(D) 

(D) 

65 
440 



13,128 

50 
174 

2,309 



17 
(D) 

(D) 

4 
27 

297 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



37 
113 

1,601 

7 
13 

107 



Under- 
ground 



14 
115 
840 



4 
27 

297 

1 
(D) 

(D) 

6 

(D) 

(D) 



25 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



185 
(D) 
(D) 

17 
62 

677 

7 
37 

366 



(D) 
(D) 

45 
406 

12,723 



43 
(D) 

(D) 



46 

(D) 

(D) 



234 



31 
(D) 

(D) 



82 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods ^ 



24 

341 

3,028 



22 
(D) 

(D) 



22 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



321 

8,340 

127,310 



50 
(D) 

(D) 

27 
(D) 

(D) 

19 
330 

5,247 

157 
1,412 

16,912 

150 
(D) 

(D) 

16 
486 

10,548 



42 
4,683 

79,300 

10 
210 

4,349 



7 
(D) 

(D) 



54 
943 



10,846 



20 
(D) 

(D) 



Under- 
ground 



29 

4,593 

74,819 



19 
4,182 

70,361 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



351 
4,115 

3 
(D) 

(D) 



Open- 
pit 



257 

3,265 

46,837 

48 
745 

9,276 

25 
379 

3,826 

19 
330 

5,247 

133 
1,182 

14,489 



127 
1,135 

14,032 



16 
486 



10,548 



18 
337 

(D) 

4 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 

41 
501 

6,2L5 

13 
360 

4,128 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



35 

482 

5,654 



24 
230 

2,423 

23 
(D) 

(D) 



5 
164 

(D) 

2 

(D) 

(D) 



5 
91 

516 

4 
(D) 

(D) 



Sepa- 


Nonpro 


rately 


duclng 


oper- 


estab- 


ated 


lish- 


prepa- 


ments 


ration 




plants 





9 
(D) 
(D) 

1 
(D) 

(D) 

1 
(D) 

(D) 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



3 

(D) 

(D) 



19 
(D) 
(D) 

1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



4 
10 



31 
127 



5 
4 

(3) 



6 
19 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



V-: 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing figures for individual companies. 

Includes data for 21 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 

Includes data for 14 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
■'Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded capital expenditures. 



122 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
Mountain 



Table 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, by Counties: 1958 and 1954 

(For county statistics, see table e of the individual State Reports) 



Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group: 1958 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Gold and silver ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 Metal mining services 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 
120 Bituminous coal and liguite 



12C Goal mining services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

1"41 Dimension stone 

lAlM Dimension stone In manufactures 

142 Crushed and broken stone 

142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 

144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel in manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonmetalllc minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c, in 

manufactures 





All mineral operations 






Number of operations by Industry group (See 


headnote 


for titles) — 








Division and size 
class 




Classi- 
fied In 


In- 
cluded 






















































Total 


mineral 
indus- 
tries 


manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108 


109 


120 


120 


131 


132 


138 


141 


141 

M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 

M 


147 


148 


149 


149 
M 


Mountain, total 


3,916 


3,803 


113 


29 


115 


188 


234 




153 


64 


611 


215 


6 


1,001 


53 


546 


37 


10 


69 


21 


227 


56 


70 


20 


72 


16 


97 


6 


No enployees 


741 


738 


3 


5 


28 


49 


99 




51 


5 


155 


24 


4 


211 


1 


25 


13 




5 




21 


2 


25 


1 


7 




10 




1-4 employees 


1,644 


1,580 


64 


12 


38 


82 


109 




59 


31 


280 


96 


1 


447 


9 


174 


20 


6 


28 


5 


93 


37 


21 


15 


28 


3 


49 


1 


5-9 enployees 


523 


501 


22 


2 


8 


11 


10 




13 


8 


73 


26 




130 


8 


98 


2 


4 


13 


8 


64 


5 


6 


2 


11 


5 


13 


3 


10-19 enployees . . . 


434 


418 


16 


2 


9 


18 


6 




8 


7 


41 


22 




99 


13 


110 


2 


... 


15 


5 


34 


9 


7 


2 


5 


6 


14 


... 


20-49 enployees... 


303 


297 


6 


4 


6 


12 


4 




12 


6 


25 


24 


1 


48 


16 


105 






4 


3 


12 


1 


7 




4 


1 


6 


2 


50-99 enployees... 


143 


142 


1 


1 


2 


5 


4 




5 


2 


18 


13 




40 


6 


25 






3 




2 


1 


3 




9 


1 


3 


• ■ • 


100-249 employees. 


74 


73 


1 


2 


2 


4 


1 




2 


5 


16 


5 




20 


... 


9 


... 


... 


1 


... 


1 


1 


1 


... 


2 


... 


2 


... 


250-i99 employees. 


26 

17 


26 

17 


... 


1 


7 
6 


5 
2 


"i 




1 
1 


... 


2 

1 


3 
2 




4 

1 






















3 
3 


... 


... 




500-999 employees. 
























1,000-2,499 
























employees 


10 


10 


... 


... 


8 


... 


... 




1 


... 


... 


... 




1 






























2,500 enployees 






























and over 


1 


1 


... 


... 


1 














... 


. 













































































PACIFIC 

123 



124 




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CVJ 

<=> 

1— H 

CO 



CD 



03 



00 
CT) 






CO 

=5 
C/) 

z 

UJ 

o 



3 
< 

q: 

CO 



o 






o 
u. 



< 

K QJ 

X 

UJ 



< 
tr. 

UJ 






^^^B 



CD 

< 



o 



en 
< 



o 



< 



(3U0 



o 




tao 



^ a. 



I I— 



< 
LU 

>- 

</) 

Z 
UJ 

O 



CT) 

o5 



O 






o 

UJ 

o 
o 



o 

lO 



CM 



< 



SQNVSnOHl Nl 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
Pacific 



125 



Table 1.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations; 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of coluim captions see Introduction. For more detailed historical statistics for this dtate, see table 1 of the corresponding 
chapter of the 1954 Census of Mineral Industries, Vol. II. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 



Kliid of operation 
and year 



Mineral industries 
only: 

1958 

1954 

Including operations 
in manufactures: 
All operations: 

1958 

1954* 

1939' 

1919» 

1909' 

1902^^ 

Excluding oil and 
gas extraction 
industries: 

1958 

1954* 

1939' 

1929^* 

1919' 

1909'. 

1902^' 



Establish- 
ments, 
number 



To- 
tal 



2,059 
2,755 



2,227 
2,861 
52,354 
939 
2,686 
1*2,775 



1,292 
1,880 
%102 
7S6 
523 
2,176 
%,470 



20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploye 
ees 



307 
360 



325 
372 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



165 
174 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



All enployees 



Number 



37,047 
43,898 



38,424 
44,819 
46,399 
28,593 
34,036 
24,054 



15,165 
17,178 
21,184 
16,100 
14,293 
25,920 
22,527 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



228,925 

223,675 



235,893 
227,431 
85,105 
47,165 
29,112 
21,608 



84,185 
79,221 
34,408 
26,170 
20,738 
20,076 
20,042 



Production and 
development workers 



26,062 
33,218 



27,429 
34,137 
38,764 
25,678 
31,183 
^^21,631 



11,934 
13,867 
18,995 
14,442 
13,243 
24,241 
^0,498 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



52,871 
66,398 



55,579 

68,232 

77,826 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



25,332 
28,456 
41,559 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



142,881 
155,722 



149,784 
159,471 
64,350 
41,016 
25,276 
18,608 



62,948 
61,363 
28,976 
21,915 
18,458 
17,703 
17,509 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 



($1,000) 



1,265,284 
'1,350,173 



1,299,098 

^,367,855 

333,283 

133,199 

39,562 

27,445 



245,278 
^197, 633 
75,177 
41,524 
26,163 
28,144 
24,390 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 

elec- 
tricity 



^175, 448 
175,791 



* 182, 601 

*179,826 

46,357 

43,332 

28,702 

8,002 



*72,843 
*'^58,575 
21,856 
13,131 
12,878 
11,214 
6,508 



Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 



2l0£^176 
^29,250 



^8,177 

"29,251 

(NA) 

876 

2,919 

(NA) 



1,735 

^'^5,290 

(NA) 

(NA) 

366 

2,915 

(NA) 



Con- 
tract 
work 



109,322 
144,695 



*lfi9,376 

*i44,706 

20,782 

1,527 

829 

807 



■^9,279 
*10,862 
462 
870 
558 
450 
458 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
in- 
stalled 



47,757 
72,765 



=47,807 
5 72, 790 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



'13,051 
'18,643 
(NA) 
2,835 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ^ 



($1,000) 



1,534,282 
'1,544,353 



1,575,303 

'1^66,056 

400,422 

178,984 

72,033 

36,351 



313,245 
^262, 384 
97,495 
55,525 
39,965 
42,723 
31,356 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



171,705 
228,371 



^71,756 
^228,422 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



'28,941 
'28,669 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



Energy used 

(kwh 
equivalent) 



Total 

(mil- 
lion) 



37,106 
39,178 



=37,113 

'39,180 

29,396 

^°21,722 

(NA) 

(NA) 



'7,209 

'5,783 

3,339 

1,575 

^°2,024 

(NA) 

(NA) 



Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 



1,424 
1,179 



1,353 

1,148 

758 

846 

(NA) 

(NA) 



6,041 
417 
176 
109 
153 
(NA) 
(NA) 



For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment in making manufactured products. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of 
shipments (or production for 1919 and 1909) and contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for 
preparation. The approximate magnitude of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other 
years represents net production and excludes this duplication. For years prior to 1958, excludes the value of residue gas from natural gas liquids 
plants . 

^For Washington, the cost of minerals received for preparation in the Metal Mining and Nonmetallic Minerals Mining Industries is included with the 
cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. For minerals received for preparation at natural gas liquids plants, excludes the 
cost of natural gas processed, but includes the estimated value prior to processing of natural gas liquids contained in such gas. 

*For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is 
included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, an^ purciiased fuels and eiec^;ri^:J-^^. l''or i95o, see axsu lootnoxe tt. 

'Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 
^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'Except, in part, for value of shipments and value added in mining, excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction with 
quarries. The value added in dressing granite at such operations in California was $47 thousand; this value has been included in the value of ship- 
ments and value added in mining. The oCMiparable value for other dimension stone operations is not available. For "Excluding oil and gas extraction 
industries," includes data for 2 establishments in Washington In the Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Industry. 

Represents number of mines and quarries, number of natural gas liquids plants, and, for crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services 
industries, number of operating conpanies. 

'Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations and for stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime establishments . The value of 
products of such establishments in 1929 was about $12 million. See also footnote 14. For "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries," for 1919, 
includes data for 2 nonproducing establishments In Washington in the Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Industry and for one such establishment in 
Oregon in 1909. 

^Excludes purchased electricity. For "All operations" in 1939, the quantity of purchased electricity amoimted to only 2 percent of the total kwh 
equivalent of energy used; but for "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries" in 1929, to 15 percent. 

■'•■'■Excludes data for sand, gravel, common clay, and shale mining operations. Includes data for 2 cement plants and for lime plants producing lime 
valued at $602 thousand. 

'"^Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for es-tablishments which operated for a shorter period. 

■^■'Figures for minerals received for preparation in the Nonmetallic Minerals Mining Industries in California are included wi'th ■those for supplies, 
purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

'■^Excludes data for ccmmon clay and shale mining operations. In 1939, "there were 47 such mines with products valued at $410 "thousand. 
'■'includes data for nonproducing crude pe^troleum establishments at which expenditures v/ere about $500 "thousand. See also foo"tnote 11. 



126 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
Pacific 
Table 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of oolunm captions see Introduction) 



Code 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Industry group and industry 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All employees 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Maji- 
hours 



(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery In- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



195-4 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures.... 



10 
1011 
102, 
103 

&ioi 

1042 

106 

1062 

108 
109 
1092 
1094 

1211 



13 
1311 



1321 
138 
1381 
1382 

1339 



U 



1411 



1421 



Metal mining 

Iron ores 

"1 Copper, lead, zinc, gold, and 

/ silver ores 

Lode gold 

Ferroalloy ores 

Manganese ores 



Metal mining services 

Miscellaneous metal ores 

Mercury ores 

Uranium-radium- vanadium ores.. 

Bituminous coal mining (Bituminous 
coal) 



Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas. 

Crude petroleiim 

Natural gas 



Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services.... 
Drilling oil and gas wells.. 
Oil and gas exploration 

services 

Oil and gas field services, 
nee 



Nonmetallic minerals mining.... 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures... 

Dimension stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures. 



Dimension stone, nee. 



Crushed and broken stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures... 

Crushed and broken limestone 
(mineral subindustry) 

Crushed and broken granite 
(mineral subindustry) 

Crushed and broken stone, nee 
(mineral subindustry) 



14A1 



145 



1459 

147 
1474 

149 

1492 
1495 
1499 



Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures.... 

Common sand and gravel 

(mineral subindustry) 

Glass sand and molding sand... 

Clay and related minerals 

(mineral industries only) 

Fire clay 

Clay and related minerals, nee 
Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures.... 
Chemical and fertilizer minerals : 
Potash, soda, borate minerals. 

Miscellaneous minerals, nee 

(mineral industries only) 

Gypsum (mineral industry only) 

Pumice and pumicite 

Nonmetallic minerals, nee 



2,227 

2,059 

168 

361 
3 

175 
91 
94 
20 

4 
85 
53 
29 



13 

935 

598 

580 

18 

67 

270 

99 

20 

151 

918 
750 
168 

43 
27 

16 

21 

187 

165 

22 



41 
22 

102 

455 

381 

74 

365 
16 

49 

15 



105 
12 
28 
14 



325 

307 

18 

22 
1 

10 
6 
2 



160 

69 

65 

4 

33 
58 
33 



22 

138 
120 

18 

2 
2 



35 
25 

10 

6 
5 

14 

79 

75 

4 

74 
1 

5 
1 
3 
2 
1 



38,424 
37,047 
^1,377 

2,628 
351 

1,025 

321 

487 

63 

79 
686 
468 
198 



276 

23,259 

16,665 

16,186 

479 

1,801 
4,793 
2,673 

203 

1,917 

12,261 
10,884 
31,377 

174 

68 

106 

77 

2,400 

1,752 

3648 



451 
314 

987 

5,161 

4 727 

3434 



4,596 

131 



454 
370 
232 
105 
3 127 

2,554 

1,150 

68 

158 

769 



235,893 

228,925 

36,968 

14,241 
1,993 

5,636 

1,514 

2,745 

312 

427 
3,440 
2,236 
1,073 



1,360 

151,708 

113,026 

110,003 

3,023 

11,113 
27,569 
16,402 

1,123 

10,044 

68,584 
61,616 
36,968 

750 
254 
496 

351 

12,825 

9,503 

33,322 



2,209 
1,980 

5,314 

28,824 
26,507 
32,317 



25,723 
784 



2,245 
3 290 

1,080 

500 

358O 

16,407 



5,803 
330 
490 

4,243 



27,429 
26,062 
3l,367 

2,052 
252 

774 

276 

374 

54 

73 
579 
403 
162 



245 

15,495 

9,879 

9,665 

214 

1,531 
4,085 
2,298 

171 

1,616 

9,637 

8,270 

31,367 

157 
61 
96 



2,146 

1,498 

3648 



390 
272 

836 

4,169 

3 735 

3434 



3,627 
108 



397 

265 

220 

93 

3 127 

1,555 



872 

54 

134 

557 



55,579 

52,871 

2,708 

4,257 
477 

1,616 
565 
756 
118 

163 

1,245 

868 

345 



391 

30,247 

19,351 

18,966 

385 

2,981 
7,915 
4,411 

383 

3,121 

20,684 

17,976 

2,708 

291 
122 
169 

136 

4,747 
3,451 
1,296 



786 
555 

2,110 

8,884 
8,016 



7,782 
234 



679 
115 
436 
182 
254 

3,403 



1,905 
119 
173 

1,367 



149,784 

142,881 

6,903 

9,948 
1,329 

3,527 

1,292 

1,949 

266 

384 
2,759 
1,840 

840 



1,202 

86,836 

55,618 

54,399 

1,219 

9,043 
22,175 
13,227 

924 

8,024 

51,798 

4^,895 

6,903 

669 
238 
431 

312 

11,242 
7,920 
3,322 



1,786 
1,697 

4,437 

22,748 

20,431 

2,317 

19,794 
637 

1,851 
266 

1,007 
427 
580 

9,684 

4,038 
227 
375 

2,899 



1,299,098 

1,265,284 

33,814 

47,212 
15,934 

9,618 

4,721 

10,888 

1,688 

968 
9,804 
4,577 
5,238 



1,609 

1,053,820 
945,738 

911,025 
34,713 

59,553 
48,529 
27,708 

1,653 

19,168 

196,457 

162,643 

33,814 

1,658 
785 
873 



37,481 
21,245 
16,236 

4,448 
5,136 

11,661 

85,901 
73,058 
12,843 

70,103 
2,955 

6,037 
1,085 
2,206 
1,180 
1,026 

40,908 

18,592 
1,401 
1,760 

13,593 



-447,961 

440,703 

^7,258 

19,654 
3,294 

5,020 

1,484 

3,176 

450 

406 
7,758 
1,666 
5,928 



1,015 

351,053 

210,730 

203,976 

6,754 

113,582 
26,741 
18,292 

982 

7,467 

276,239 
68,981 
27,258 

567 
250 
317 

241 

212,916 
8,723 
24,193 



1,760 
1,760 

5,203 

331,202 
29,398 

2l,804 

28,149 
1,249 



2,813 

^60 

2l,419 

864 

2555 

19,576 



7,372 
262 
472 

5,757 



'1,575,303 

1,534,282 

^41,021 

58,714 
18,217 

13,710 

5,692 

(D) 

1,722 

1,308 

(D) 

5,629 

6,635 



^171,756 

171,705 

*51 

8,152 
1,011 

925 
513 
(D) 
416 

66 

(D) 

614 

4,531 



2,535 

1,262,058 

1,020,738 

983,054 

37,684 

171,087 
70,233 
42,100 

2,530 

25,603 

3251,996 
210,975 
341,021 

2,113 

974 

1,139 

1,051 

348,196 
27,767 
320,429 



5,630 
6,489 

15,648 

3l08,944 
94,297 
3l4,647 

90,329 
3,? 

8,298 
3l,320 
33,361 

1,780 
3l,581 

53,154 

24,075 
1,463 
1,950 

18,306 



44,819 

43 898 

3921 

3,814 
(NA) 

(NA) 
719 
(NA) 

118 

64 

(NA) 

321 

29 



1^67,855 
'1,350,173 
17,682 

'39,003 
(NA) 

(NA) 
3,675 

(NA) 
1,122 

455 

(NA) 

2,169 

(NA) 



89 

142,815 

135,730 

131,947 

3,783 

2,048 
5,037 
3,900 

105 

1,032 

*20,700 

20,649 

*51 

112 
61 

51 

56 

(NA) 

2,201 

(NA) 

578 
407 

1,216 

(NA.) 

8,159 

(NA) 



7,923 
236 



552 
(NA) 
(NA) 

264 
(NA) 

7,330 



1,5 
200 
282 

1,044 



^708 

27,641 

17,210 

16,724 

486 

2,101 
8,330 
5J237 



>■ 3,093 

12,656 

11,735 

3921 

131 

131 

(NA) 

2,452 

■32,452 

436 
273 

(NA) 

(NA) 

5,639 

(NA) 



(NA.) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
312 
136 
3l76 

2,337 

(NA) 

54 

141 

800 



"3,402 

1,170,222 

1,012,206 

982,597 

29,609 

■^84,655 
73,361 
47,063 



26,293 

155,228 

137,546 

17,682 

832 

832 

(NA) 
33,243 
33,243 

5,055 
2,916 

(NA) 

(NA) 

71,708 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA.) 

(NA) 

3,382 

1,140 

2,242 

24,301 

(NA) 

816 

1,209 

3,461 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. NA not available. ■'■Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in 
manufacturing establishments. 2jroi. crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, 
excludes the cost of purchased machinery installed. 3por crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in man- 
facturing establishments, the niimber of production and development workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. New data were obtained 
on other employees at such operations, hence, the same figures are included for production and development workers and for all employees at such 
operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes the estimated value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment at such opera- 
tions in making manufactured products. ''Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in 
manufacturing establishments. 'Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. ^Includes data for one establishment in the Lignite 
Industry and 2 establishments in the Coal Mining Services Industries. 'For 1954, no data were obtained on the cost of gas received for processing 
or on the value of residue gas. However, the estimated value, prior to processing, of natural gas liquids contained in such gas was used in computing 
value added in mining. 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
Pacific 



127 



Table IB.-Selccted Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries; 1958 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
Code 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Industry group and industry 



Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



Capital expenditures 
C$1,000) 



Total 



De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 



Net shipments of primary products'- 



By establish- 
ments classified 
in the Industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



($1,000) 



By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral Industries 
and In manufactur- 
ing industries 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



All mineral industries . 



10 
1011 

l^' 
&104 

1042 

106 
109 
1092 
1094 

1211 



13 
13U 



1321 
138 
1381 
1389 



14 
U21 



14^1 



145 
147 

1474 

149 
1499 



Metal mining 

Iron ores 

\ Copper, lead, zinc, gold, and 

/ silver ores 

Lode gold 



Ferroalloy ores 

Miscellaneous metal ores 

Mercury ores 

Uranlum-radium-vanadium ores . 

Bituminous coal mining (Bitumi- 
nous coal ) 



Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 

NatUTEil gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services 

Drilling oil and gas wells . . . 

Oil and gas field services, 
nee 



Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Crushed and broken stone 

Crushed and broken limestone. 
Crushed and broken granite . . . 
Crushed and broken stone, nee. 

Sand and gravel 

Common sand and gravel 



Clay and related minerals 

Chemical and fertilizer 
minerals : 
Potash, soda, borate minerals 

Miscellaneous minerals, nee... 
Nonmetallic minerals , nee ... . 



440,703 

19,654 
3,294 

5,020 
1,484 

3,176 
7,758 
1,666 
5,928 



1,015 

351,053 

210,730 

203,976 

6,754 

113,582 
26,741 
18,292 

7,467 

68,981 
8,723 
1,760 
1,760 
5,203 

29,398 
28,149 

2,813 



19,576 

7,372 
5,757 



^175,448 

12,364 
1,107 

4,365 
*1,125 

2,124 
*4,234 
''1,340 
'2,776 



■^953 

109,758 

85,519 

83,459 

2,060 

4,842 
19,397 
12,733 

5,815 

^54,107 
6,424 
1,137 
1,258 

4,029 

22,176 
21,069 

■*2,106 



■'16,458 

^6,101 
5,145 



^108,176 
(*) 



2 

(*) 



196 
(') 
(*) 
(*) 



(^) 
106,442 

XXX 
XXX 
XXX 

106,4^2 

XXX 
XXX 

XXX 

(*) 

90 
52 

'38 

101 
101 

(^) 



(*) 



109,322 

4,186 
461 

386 
241 

395 

2,936 

48 

2,875 



100,097 

96,052 

92,395 

3,657 

1,239 
2,806 
2,105 

673 

5,038 
728 
263 
163 
302 

2,166 
2,158 

242 



1,013 

676 

405 



47,757 

3,104 
1,726 

267 

118 

461 
588 
278 
277 



61 

34,756 

29,159 

28,122 

1,037 

1,059 
4,538 
3,454 

979 

9,836 

1,481 

308 

339 

834- 

4,955 
4,821 

465 



2,105 

595 
207 



171,705 

8,152 
1,011 

925 
513 

(D) 

(D) 

614 

4,531 



142,815 

135,730 

131,947 

3,783 

2,048 
5,037 
3,900 

1,032 

20,649 

2,201 

578 

407 

1,216 

8,159 
7,923 

552 



7,330 

1,889 
1,044 



85,574 

1,360 
(D) 

244 
154 

285 
829 
247 
581 



25 

83,386 

83,367 

81,101 

2,266 

19 
19 



803 

73 

43 

9 

21 

449 
44^ 

29 



86,131 

6,792 
(D) 

681 
359 

(D) 

(D) 

367 

3,950 



64 

59,429 

52,363 

50,846 

1,517 

2,048 
5,018 
3,881 

1,032 

19,846 

2,128 

535 

398 

1,195 

7,710 
7,479 

523 



7,298 

1,821 
1,036 



XXX 

= 1,803 

YYY 

*243 

YYY 
YYY 

■^24,399 

^171 



260 

XXX 
YYY 

^306,094 
'72,570 

^°28,541 

YYY 
YYY 

YYY 

YYY 

17,768 
2,937 
4,360 

10,019 

70,967 
69,753 



a, 325 

YYY 
YYY 



XXX 

'18,217 

YYY 

(D) 

XYY 

xyy 

■^5,557 
(D) 



2,037 

1,014,896 

883,822 

24,700 

i°85,878 

YYY 

1-14^,740 

1^22,502 

XXX 

25,186 
5,491 
5,876 

13,272 

"■103,454 
"96,533 



YYY 

YYY 



YYY 

(NA) 

YYY 
YYY 

(NA) 



YYY 

XXX 

^4,673 
'353,019 

XXX 
XXX 



YYY 

1^15,016 

1^14,134 

160 

1,174 

1214,160 
1^14,202 



YYY 
YYY 



YYY 

(D) 

YYY 
YYY 

(D) 



YYY 

153 
12,948 
93,579 



YYY 

(11) 

(11) 



YYY 

■=22,729 



(D) 

XXX 

(D) 



(13) 

XXX 
YYY 



122 

1^21,398 

238 

1,640 

(") 



(D) 

XYX 

(NA) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

iRepresents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

■'For Washington, the cost of minerals received for preparation in the Metal Mining and Nonmetallic Minerals Mining Industries is included with the 
cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

The cost of minerals received for preparation is included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 
^Represents usable iron ore. The quantity figure is in thousands of long tons. 
^Represents crude ore mined. 

'Represents mercury metal only. The quantity figure is in flasks of 76 pounds. 
Represents thousands of barrels of crude petroleum, field condensate, and drips shipped or used. 
'Represents millions of cubic feet of natural gas shipped. 
l°Represents net shipments of natural gas liquids only. Quantity is in thousands of barrels. 

llFigures for primary products shipped or services performed in other industries or sublndustries are included with those for primary products 
shipped or services performed in the specified industry or subindustry. For sand and gravel, see also footnote 12. 

1 Includes minerals produced and used in the same establishment in making manufactured products. The value of such minerals was estimated. 
1 ^Primary products shipped by other industries in the East, South, and Pacific states are combined with those shipped by the specified industry. 
Such shipments by other industries amounted to less than one percent of the total shown. 



128 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
Pacific 



Table 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 



(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Mining only 



Total 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods-' 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Open- 
pit 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 
rately 
oper- 
ated 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 



10 



1011 



102, 
103, 
&10i 



1042 



106 



109 



1092 



1094 



All establishments: 

Number of establishments.... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000.. 

Metal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Iron ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of enployees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000.. 

Copper, lead, zinc, gold, and 
silver ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of enjjloyees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Lode gold: 

Number of establishments . 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Ferroalloy ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Miscellaneous metal ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000.. 

Mercury ores: 

Number of establishments . 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 



13 



14 



1421 



Uranium-radium-vanadium ores: 
Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Bituminous coal: 

Number of establishments 

Niimber of employees 

Value added in mining. . .$1,000. 

Oil and gas extraction: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. . .$1,000. 

Nonmetallic minerals mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of enjjloyees 

Value added in mining. . .$1,000. 

Crushed and broken stone: 

Number of establishments 

Number of enployees 

Value added in 
mining $1 , 000 . 

Crushed and broken limestone: 
Number of establishments... 

Number of enployees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Crushed and broken granite: 
Number of establishments... 

Number of eniployees 

Value added in 
mining $1 , 000 . 



1,782 
^32,175 

^1,215,787 



357 
2,549 

46,244 



3 
351 

15,934 

175 
1,025 

9,618 

91 
321 

4,721 

94 
487 

10,888 

85 
686 

9,804 



53 
468 

4,577 

29 
198 

5,238 



13 

276 

1,609 

665 

18,466 

1,005,291 



747 

^10,884 

^162, 643 



165 
1,752 

21,245 



41 
451 



4.4^8 



1,589 
^31,755 

'1,217,508 



215 
2,289 

46,411 



2 
(D) 



22 
314 

5,136 



(D) 



74 
851 

9,720 

34 
250 

4,683 

78 
(D) 

(D) 

61 
(D) 

(D) 



45 
452 

4,585 

15 
(D) 

(D) 

13 

276 

1,609 

626 

18,321 

ip06,804 



735 
^10,869 
'162,684 



162 
1,748 

21,246 

40 
(D) 

(D) 



22 
314 

5,136 



876 
^17,466 

964,838 



92 
227 

7,350 



28 
87 

713 

16 
42 

637 

49 

103 

7,138 

15 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



426 



70 
458 



559 

16,520 

947,251 



217 

^649 

^9,779 



23 
121 

1,837 

4 
30 

234 



7 
58 

1,283 I 



60 
'206 



^2,260 



38 
82 

1,131 



23 
(D) 

(D) 

13 
42 

631 



9 
(D) 

(D) 

6 
(D) 

(D) 



6 
(D) 

(D) 



7 
(D) 
(D) 



15 

40 

626 



216 
626 



13,828 



50 
135 



6,149 



(D) 
(D) 



37 
83 

5,860 

8 
(D) 

(D) 

2 
(D) 

(D) 

6 
(D) 

(D) 

1 
(D) 
(D) 



165 

3 505 

^7,724 



23 
121 

1,837 

4 
30 

234 



600 
16,634 

948,750 



70 



(D) 
(D) 

1 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



559 

16,520 

947,251 



37 

104 

1,429 



1,283 



631 
12,417 



192,443 



118 
2,038 

38,720 



2 
(D) 



(D) 



46 
764 

9,007 

18 
208 

4,046 

24 
(D) 

(D) 

46 
(D) 

(D) 

43 
(D) 

(D) 

2 
(D) 

(D) 

4 
(D) 
(D) 



509 
(D) 
(D) 

138 
(D) 

(D) 



36 
(D) 

(D) 



15 
256 



3,853 



55 
1,552 

15,473 



40 
1,212 

13,265 



484 
8,004 

141,706 



75 
(D) 

(D) 



16 
500 

5,577 

13 
182 

3,905 



260 
2,819 



16 
452 



15 
(D) 

(D) 

1 
(D) 

(D) 



3 
(D) 
(D) 



12 
(D) 
(D) 

3 

(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



30 
264 

3,430 

5 
26 

141 

13 
39 

1,218 

30 
(D) 

(D) 

28 
(D) 

(D) 

1 
(D) 

(D) 



409 

7,197 

(D) 

135 
1,518 

18,659 



34 
320 



3,556 



15 
256 



3,853 



92 
2,861 

35,264 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



2,786 
34,513 



82 
1,872 

60,227 



341 



341 



67 

1,801 

59,553 



9 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 



(D) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 
Pacific 



129 



Tabic 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of line and ooluim captions see Introduction) 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Mining only 



Total 



llnder- 

ground 

mines 



Ojien- 

plt 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods^ 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 
rately 
oper- 
ated 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 



Nonpro- 
ducing 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 



U 



1441 



145 



1474 



149 



1499 



Nonmetallic minerals mining — Con. 

Crushed and broken stone, nee. 
Number of establishments.... 

Number of eii5>loyees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Common sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments.... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000.. 

Clay and related minerals: 

Number of establishments 

N>imber of enjiloyees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Potash, soda, borate minerals: 
Number of establishments.... 

Number of enployees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Miscellaneous minerals, nee: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Nonmetallic minerals, nee: 
Number of establishments.... 

Number of engsloyees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000.. 



102 
987 

11,661 

381 
4,727 

73,058 

365 
4,596 

70, 103 

49 
454 

6,037 

7 
2,554 

40,908 

105 
1,150 

18,592 



14 
769 

13,593 



100 
(D) 

(D) 

380 
(D) 

(D) 



364 
(D) 

(D) 



48 
(D) 

(D) 



7 
2,554 



40,908 



99 
1,145 

18,617 

13 
(D) 

(D) 



12 
33 

320 

83 
(D) 

(D) 

82 
(D) 

(D) 

26 
(D) 

(D) 



56 
(D) 

(D) 

1 
(D) 

(D) 



12 
33 

320 

47 
(D) 

(D) 

46 
(D) 

(D) 

25 
(D) 

(D) 



36 
102 

1,421 

36 

102 

1,421 

1 
(D) 

(D) 



626 



41 
(D) 

(D) 

1 
(D) 

(D) 



87 
(D) 

(D) 



292 
(D) 

(D) 



277 
(D) 

(D) 



22 

413 

5,229 

5 
(D) 

(D) 

43 
(D) 

(D) 

12 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 

3 
17 

174 

3 
17 

174 

2 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



942 
11,250 

208 
3,356 

54,881 

195 
3,238 

52,182 

19 
372 

4,884 



(D) 
(D) 

41 
955 



16, C 



11 
741 

(D) 



81 
(D) 

(D) 



79 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 

5 
27 

210 

5 
27 

210 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 

1 
(D) 

(D) 

1 
(D) 

(D) 



6 
5 

{') 

1 
(D) 

(D) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

Includes data for 31 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
^Includes data for 14 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 

Includes figures for noniiEtallic minerals mining services operations. 
*Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded capital 
expenditures . 



Table 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, by Counties: 1958 and 1954 

(For county statistics, see table 3 of the individual State Reports) 



130 GEOGRAPHIC DIVISIONS 

Pacific 
Table 4.-Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group: 1958 



101 Iron ores 

102 Ccjpper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Gold and silver ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 t^tal mining services 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 
120 Bituminous coal 



12C Coal mining services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

141 Dimension stone 

141M Dimension stone in manufactures 

142 Crushed and broken stone 

142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 
14^ Sand and gravel 



144-M Sand and gravel in manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonmetallic minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c, in 

manufactures 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


Division and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries 


In- 
cluded 

In 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108 


109 


120 


12c 


131 


132 


138 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 

M 


14A 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148 


149 


149 
M 


Pacific, total 

No employees 

1-^ employees 

5-9 employees 

10-19 employees . . . 
20-^9 employees . . . 

50-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 
250-499 employees. 
500-999 employees. 
1,000- 
2,499 employees.. 


2,227 
341 
981 
315 
265 
212 

63 

33 

9 

3 

5 


2,059 
328 
891 
287 
246 
199 

59 

32 

9 

3 

5 


168 
13 
90 
28 
19 
13 

4 
1 


3 

"'i 
1 

'"i 


18 
4- 

10 

4 


21 
6 

10 
2 

1 

1 
1 


136 

61 

58 

7 

2 

5 

2 

1 




94 
42 
36 

11 
3 

1 
1 


4 

"2 

1 

1 


85 

28 

38 

8 

3 

3 

4 
1 


13 

"e 

1 
1 
3 

1 
1 




598 
82 

333 
75 
39 
38 

1^ 
6 
2 

4 


67 

""7 

5 

22 

24 

8 

1 


270 
11 

103 
38 
60 
34 

13 
11 


27 
7 

15 
3 
2 


16 
2 
7 
3 
2 
2 


165 

9 

63 

31 
37 
21 

4 


22 

"3 

9 
6 

3 

1 


381 
32 

137 
79 
58 
60 

11 
4 


74 

4 

42 

18 

6 

3 

1 


49 

14 

19 

4. 

7 

4 

"i 


54- 
7 

41 
4 

"2 


20 
2 

9 

1 
1 
1 

3 

"i 

1 

1 


3 

"2 

1 


105 
30 
42 
15 
10 
5 

2 

i 

... 

* 


2 
2 























































































































ALABAMA 



r I 



1-1 



1-2 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES— AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining by County: 1958 



ALABAMA 




RANK AMONG STATES 
EMPLOYMENT - 18 
VALUE OF SHIPMENTS -19 



p MINERAL INDUSTRIES 
Q INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COA^ERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



EMPLOYMENT 

8000- 12000 

4000- 7999 

2000- 3999 

1000- 1999 — 
500 - 999 — 
200 - 499 — 

25- 199 — 




MINING IN ALABAMA 

Employment For Industry Group By County: 1958 



1-3 



Metal Mining 




Oil and Gas Extraction 




General Extent of Oil and Gas Fields 



Coal Mining 




General Extent of Coal Fields 



Nonmetallic Minerals Mininc 




^ MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

Q INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 




!,500 5,000 7,500 

Number of Employees 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



1-4 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining 

Including Mining in Manufactures: 1902- 1958 
ALABAMA 



40 



30 



to 

i 
'I 

^ 20 



10 



1902 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



1909 



I OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION 

I AND NONMETALLIC MINERALS MINING 



METAL MINING 
COAL MINING 



INCLUDED JN MANUFACTURES^ 




1919 1929 1939 

CENSUS YEAR 



I95A^ /95a 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



ALABAMA 



1-5 



Tabic 1.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations: 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of column coptions see Introduction. For more detailed historical statistics for this State, see table 1 of the corresponding 
chapter of the \9iJ, Census of Mineral Industries, Vol. IT. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 





Establish- 
ments, 
number 




1 mm^c> 


Production 


and 


Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 


Selected expenses ($1,000) 


Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ^ 

($1,000) 


Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 

($1,000) 


Energy used 

(kwh 
equivalent) 






development workers 


Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 


Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 


Con- 
tract 
work 


Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
in- 
stalled 


Kind of operation 
and year 


To- 
tal 


20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 


Number 


Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 


Number 


Man- 
hours 

a,000) 


Wages 
($1,000) 


Total 

(mil- 
lion) 


Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 


Mineral industries 
only: 

1958 

1954 

Including operations 
in manufactures: 

1958 

1954* 

1939' 

1929' 

1919^° 


316 
37S 

357 

413 

8341 

222 

264 

225 

«265 


S3 
SS 

91 

98 

(NA) 

(MA.) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


11,939 
14,364 

12,583 
15,136 
26,953 
33,735 

34,591 
30,093 
20,134 


55,059 
54,940 

57,389 
57,317 
26,449 
34 , 860 

40,165 
15,966 
11,348 


10,555 
12,880 

11,174 
13,602 
25,758 
31,978 

32,579 
28,300 
'^9, 177 


17,501 
22,038 

18,745 

23,526 

39,827 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


45,551 
44,782 

47,742 
46,947 
23,764 
30,938 

36,230 
14,277 
10,360 


127,055 
^93,638 

138,254 

^100, 869 

33,849 

43,342 

49,138 
19,883 
15,056 


^63,839 
^39,054 

2 *66,007 

"27,562 

7,702 

11,229 

10,561 
3,566 
2,045 


{') 

13,023 
(NA) 
(NA) 

128 
(NA) 


8,452 
3,768 

■^8,452 

"3,768 

301 

95 

167 
774 
267 


10,355 
8,862 

'10,381 

'8,920 

(NA) 

1,793 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


196,029 
^137, 141 

209,396 

^145, 888 

41,852 

54,666 

59,866 
24,351 
17,368 


13,672 
8,183 

=13,698 

'8,256 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


""i^gi 

1,253 

'1,261 
1,815 
2,615 

^6,100 
(NA) 
(NA) 


'"l^l 
97 

93 
70 
82 

187 


1909"^° 


(NA) 
(NA) 


1902^^ 





NA Not available. Revised. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of min- 
erals produced and used in the same establishment in making manufactured products. For 1958, 1934, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of ship- 
ments (or production for 1919 and 1909) and contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for 
preparation. The approximate magnitude of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For 
other years represents net production and excludes this duplication. 

^Figures for minerals received for preparation are included with those for supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

■'Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 

"For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is included 
with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

'Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments, if any. 

'Excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction with quarries. 

^Represents number of mines and quarries . 

'Excludes data for common clay and shale and crude petroleum and natural gas extraction operations, if any. For 1939, there were 15 such clay 
and shale mines with products valued at $130 thousand. No oil and gas field operations were reported for 1939. 

^"Excludes data for sand, gravel, common clay, and shale mining operations and stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime plants. 
In 1929, there were 10 such sand and gravel establishments, with products valued at $1,303 thousand, such stone quarries at 7 cement plants, with 
croducts valued at $621 thousand, and such stone quarries at 5 lime plants. For 1919, excludes data for 2 nonproducing establishments. 

■''■Excludes purchased electricity. For 1929, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to 10 percent of the total kwh equivalent of energy 
used. 

■'■^Excludes data for sand, gravel, common clay, and shale operations. Includes data for 1 cement plant and for lime plants producing lime valued 
at $236 thousand . 

■"■^Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 



\ 



1-6 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of colamn captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Industry group and industry 



Total 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 



(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added iji 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery In- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



195-i-' 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



10 
1011 



12 
1211 



13 
1311 



138 
1381 



1^ 



I'i'il 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures. 



Metal mining. 
Iron ores . . 



Bituminous coal mining. 
Bituminous coal 



Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas. 



Oil and gas field services 

Drilling oil and gas wells 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures 

Dimension stone 

Crushed and brolien stone; 

Crushed and broken limestone.. 
Sand and gravel (mineral 

industry only) 

Clay and related minerals 
(including operations in 

manufactures) 

Clay and related minerals, nee 
(including operations in 
manufactures ) 



357 

316 

41 

33 

30 

151 
U7 

51 
A2 

9 
5 

122 

81 

A-1 

6 

33 

33 



37 
24 



40 
40 



12,583 

11,939 

^644 



2,702 
2,547 

7,484 
7,453 

338 
222 

116 
58 



2^059 

1,415 

^644 

276 



3985 
391 

^216 

3 123 



57,389 
55,059 
'2,330 

12,785 
12,168 

35,606 
35,411 

1,758 
1,355 

403 
200 

7,240 

4,910 

'2,330 

944 

'3,771 
1,233 



'704 



'329 



11,174 

10 555 

'619 



2,339 
2,192 

6,649 
6,622 

306 
198 

108 
52 

1,880 

1 261 

'619 

251 

'916 

330 

'204 

'123 



18,745 

17,501 

1,244 

4,031 
3,721 

10,330 
10,273 

656 

474 

182 
77 

3,728 

2,484 

1,244 

505 

1,772 

711 



371 



236 



47,742 

45,551 

2,191 

10,984 
10,427 

28,970 
28,821 

1,545 
1,182 

363 
170 

6,243 

4,052 

2,191 

805 

3,311 

996 



617 



329 



138,254 

127,055 

11,199 

43,133 
41,586 

59,345 
58,799 

12,063 
11,357 

706 
347 

23,713 

12,514 

11,199 

1,867 

12,485 



4,392 



3,343 



^84,840 
82,646 
^2,194 

37,514 
36,749 

30,560 
30,377 

9,624 
9,090 

534 
389 

^7,142 

4,948 

^2,194 

566 

24, 152 

1,145 

2 516 

23I6 



'209,396 
196,029 
'13,367 

77,235 
75,015 

85,873 
85,186 

17,613 
16,417 

1,196 
693 

'28,675 

15,308 

'13,367 

2,396 

'15,690 

3,588 



'4,837 



•13,698 

13,672 

-^26 

3,412 
3,320 

4,032 
3,990 

4,074 
4,030 

44 
43 

■^2,180 

2,154 

*26 

37 

"^947 

546 



'■71 



15,136 
364 
772 



14 364 

3' 



'3,637 



■^22 



3,882 
3,840 

8,717 
8,688 

243 
104 

139 
14 

2,294 

1,522 

'772 

409 

(NA) 
450 



'241 



'119 



'100,869 

'93,638 

7,231 

'27,292 
27,060 

54,638 
54,328 

2,289 
1,181 

1,108 
104 

16,650 
9,419 
7,231 
1,874 

(NA) 
2,527 



2,034 



(NA) 



NA Not available. 

•"■Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments, if any. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machin- 
ery installed. 

'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the number of production and develop- 
ment workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same figures 
are included for production and development workers and for all employees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts. Includes the esti- 
mated value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment at such operations. 

''Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 



ALABAMA 



1-7 



Tabic 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries; 1958 

(For explanation of oolunin captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
Code 



Industry group and industry 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Total 



Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 



Total 



De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 



Net shipments of primary products^ 



By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



($1,000) 



By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



10 
1011 



12 
1211 



13 
1311 



lA 



All mineral industries 

Metal mining 

Iron ores 

Bituminous coal mining 

Bituminous coal 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 



82,646 

37,514 
36,749 

30,560 
30,377 

9,624 
9,090 

4,948 



^63,839 

'31,876 
^31,372 

17,028 
16.895 



4,662 
4,180 

3,523 



(') 

6,750 
6,750 



8,452 



2,699 
2,526 



2,473 
2.458 



3,109 
3,100 



10.355 



2,939 
2,851 



4,309 
4,274 



1,853 
1,810 



13,672 

3,412 
3,320 

4,032 
3,990 

4,074 
4,030 



1,009 

203 
202 

41 
41 

673 
673 

92 



3,209 
3,118 

3,991 
3,949 

3,401 
3,357 

2,062 



XXX 

*7,012 

XXX 

11,761 

XXX 

55,373 



XXX 

* 74, 963 

XXX 

78,185 

XXX 

15,615 



XXX 

(*)' 



XXX 

(*) 



^Represents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

^Figures for minerals received for preparation are included with those for supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

^Represents gross shipments of direct-shipping and beneficiating-grade iron ores and of iron concentrates and agglomerates. Figures for value 
of such products shipped in other industries are included with those for the value of primary products shipped in the specified industry. 

'Represents only thousands of barrels of crude petroleum shipped. In addition, 26 million cubic feet of natural gas were shipped. 



Table 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 



Ind. 
code 



ID 



1211 



1311 



(For explanation of line and colmnn captions see Introduction) 



Industry group or Industry 
and item 



All industries: 

Number of establishments . . . 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Metal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. . .$1,000. 

Bituminous coal: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. . .$1,000. 

Crude petroleum and natural gas: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining — $1,000. 

Nonmetallic minerals mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. . .$1,000. 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



301 
11,658 



124,375 



32 

*2,702 

*43,133 



147 

7,453 

58,799 



42 

222 

11.357 



n,415 
*L2,514 



Producing establishments 



274 
11,664 



125,120 



145 

(D) 
(D) 



18 

214 

12.092 



80 

^1,415 

■^12,514 



Mining only 



135 
2,404 



26,833 



85 

797 

4,770 



18 

214 

12,092 



24 
(D) 
(D) 



Under- 
ground 



67 
1,636 

9,905 



63 

509 

2,058 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



42 
460 



5 
(D) 

(D) 



18 

210 

1,928 



19 

222 

1,843 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods-'- 



26 
308 



4 

78 

784 



18 

214 

12,092 



4 

16 

106 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



133 

(D) 

(D) 



55 
(D) 
(D) 



56 
(D) 
(D) 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



39 

(D) 

(D) 



2 

(D) 
(D) 



36 

6,005 

47,624 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



Open- 
pit 

mines 



83 
1,917 

18,280 



20 

338 

3,018 



18 

587 

5,747 



45 

992 

9,515 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods ^ 



11 
140 



918 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



10 
(D) 
(D) 



Sepa- 


Nonpro 


rately 


ducing 


oper- 


estab- 


ated 


lish- 


prepa- 


ments 


ration 




plants 





6 

(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



5 

53 

607 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

■"-Includes data for 3 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
^Includes data for one sand and gravel establishment for which the method of mining was not specified. 

^Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded capital 
expenditures . 

■'includes data for mining services establishments. 



27 
11 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



2 

(D) 
(D) 



24 
8 



l!!. 



1-8 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 3.-General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 

or more 

enfjloy- 

ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



1954^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



10 



13 



14 



13 

12 

12 

14 

13 

131 

138 



101 



14 



12 



ALABAMA: 

All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures. 

COUNTIES 



Baldwin. 
Barbour . 
Bibb.... 



Blount (mineral industries 
only) 



Butler 

Calhoun (including operations 
in manufactures ) 



Choctaw. 
Clarke . . 
Colbert. 
Cullman. 



Dallas (including operations 
in manufactures) 



Escambia (mineral industries 
only) 

Oil and gas extraction 



Jefferson, total 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures. 
Bituminous coal mining 



Marlon 

Bituminous coal mining. 



Marshall. 



Mobile (oil and gas extraction 

only) 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 

Oil and gas field services 

Montgomery (including opera- 
tions in manufactures) 



Morgan (including operations 
in manufactures) 



Pike. 



Russell (including operations 
in manufactures ) 



Shelby, total 

^&neral industries 

Included in manufactures . . 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 
(including operations in 

manufactures) 

Mineral industries only 

Talladega (including opera- 
tions in manufactures) 



357 

316 

41 



Tuscaloosa 

Bituminous coal mining. 



24 



12,583 

11,939 

*644 



229 

71 

*37 

17 

1 

80 
22 

51 



7,716 

7,628 

*88 

5,092 



418 
418 



39 



234 



120 
114 



^•84 



■•49 



104 



422 

459 

314 

^145 



*309 
164 



"^354 

280 
220 



57,389 
55,059 
*2,330 



104 
143 
225 

942 
284 

"^120 

89 

3 

289 

55 

163 



125 
61 

37, 574 

37,175 

*399 

24,937 

1,292 
1,292 

155 



1,133 

737 
396 



"264 

■^251 
368 

*47 

1,335 

8A8 

■^487 



■^1,019 
532 



*1,174 

1,476 
1,165 



11,174 

10,555 

*619 



(NA) 
52 
84 

210 
64 

•^32 

(NA) 

(NA) 

64 

22 

36 



(NA) 
(NA) 

6,702 

6,614 

^^88 

4,445 

(NA) 
378 

32 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



'•75 

*44 
98 

(NA) 

429 

284 

■^14 5 



■^294 

149 



4327 



266 
208 



18,745 

17,501 

1,244 



(NA) 
94 
91 

368 

134 

60 

(NA) 

(NA) 

91 

41 

81 



(NA) 
(NA) 

10, 562 

10,381 

181 

6,646 

(MA) 
618 

47 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



181 

124 
182 

(NA) 

746 
455 

291 



528 
237 



680 



474 
339 



47,742 

45,551 

2,191 



(NA) 
125 
182 

836 
260 

84 

(NA) 

(NA) 

220 

55 

99 



(NA) 
(NA) 

30,236 

29,837 

399 

19,277 

(NA) 
1,093 

102 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



236 

198 
258 

(NA) 

1,215 
728 
487 



932 
445 



970 

1,374 
1,075 



138,254 

127,055 

11,199 



(NA) 
303 
264 

1,459 
917 

225 

(NA) 

(NA) 

1,042 

128 

396 



(NA) 
(NA) 

81,151 

78,090 

3,061 

37,179 

(NA) 
2,028 

376 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



1,447 

729 
1,351 

(NA) 

3,974 
1,895 
2,079 



3,608 
1,529 



2,907 

3,652 
2,598 



384,840 
82,646 
^2,194 



(MA) 
290 
(D) 

1,245 
430 

361 
(NA) 
(NA) 

347 
96 

(D) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

3 56, 460 

56,124 

^336 

19,404 

(NA) 
1,974 

142 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(D) 

(D) 
390 

(NA) 

'1,633 

863 

3770 



3l,528 
758 



3618 

1,522 
1,185 



*209,396 
196,029 
*13,367 



127 
555 
649 

2,530 
1,257 

*285 

1,032 

91 

1,325 

194 

521 



2,470 
2,342 

*131,857 

128,460 

*3,397 

53,991 

3,912 
3,857 

485 



14,236 

13,033 

1,203 



■^1,484 

4933 
1,641 

*1,039 

*5,467 

2,618 

''2,849 



*5,006 
2,157 



^^2,961 

4,601 
3,480 



'13,698 

13,672 

'26 



(NA) 

38 

(D) 

174 
90 

5l 

(NA) 

(NA) 

64 

30 

(D) 



(HA) 
(NA) 

55,754 

5,754 

(NA) 

2,592 

(NA) 
145 

33 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(D) 

(D) 
100 

(NA) 

=140 

140 

(NA) 

'130 
130 

'564 

573 
303 



15,136 

14,364 

■^772 



(NA) 

(NA) 

753 

136 
39 

*106 
850 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(MA) 

71 



«64 
831 

10,658 

10,533 

*125 

■^6,490 

(NA) 
276 

(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



■^87 

(NA) 
31 

■^42 

437 
296 
*141 



(NA) 
(NA) 



*270 

(NA) 
308 



See footnotes at end of table. 



ALABAMA 



1-9 



Table 3.-Gencral Staristics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954-Continued 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 





County and industry group 


1958 


1954^ 


Ind. 


Establishments, 
number^ 


All employees 


Production and 
development workers 


Value 

added in 

mining 

($1,000) 


Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
Installed 

($1,000) 


Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 


Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 

($1,000) 


All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 


Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 


code 


Total 


With 20 
or more 
employ- 
ees 


Number 


Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 


Number 


Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 


Wages 
($1,000) 


12 
138 


COUNTIES— Continued 

Walker (mineral industries 
only) 

Bituminous coal raining 

Washington 


3i 

31 

A 
35 


10 
8 

1 


1,355 

18 

122 


7,175 
7,011 

63 

601 


1,321 
1,252 

(NA) 

(MA) 


2,288 

2,161 

(NA) 
(NA) 


6,603 
6, "439 

(NA) 

(NA) 


16,187 
15,838 

(NA) 

(NA) 


■6,502 
6,386 

(NA) 

(NA) 


21,863 
21,436 

89 

806 


826 
788 

(NA) 

(NA) 


^1,368 
■'1,274 

(NA) 

(NA) 


'11,456 
■^10,517 

(NA) 

(NA) 


13 


Undistributed 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

NA Not available. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments, if any. 

^Companies operating oil and gas field properties were permitted to make only one report for all oil and gas field operations in each State. 
Companies engaged only in performing oil and gas field or other mining services were permitted to make only one report for all States; these reports 
were classified on the basis of the principal State in which the service was performed. For 1958, such reports contained employment on March 15 and 
selected other data by State and county. For such operations, the State total figures shown for number of establishments represent the number of re- 
ports received which were classified in the State and those shown. for number of establishments in a county- represent the number of reports that indi- 
cated any operations in the specified county. All county statistics shown which were not reported separately were obtained by allocating the totals 
reported for each company on the basis of the reported county data. 

■'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machinery 
installed. 

*See table 2A, footnote 3. 

'Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for the Uraniuro-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 

''Represents the Bituminous Coal Industry only. 

^Excludes data for the Oil and Gas Field Services Industries. 

'Excludes data for one crude petroleum or natural gas establishment. See also footnote 8. 



1-10 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Gold and silver ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 Metal mining ser\rices 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 
120 Bituminous coa] 



12C Coal mining ser\fices 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

141 Dimension stone 

141M Dimension stone in manufactures 

142 Crushed and broken stone 

142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 
144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel in manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonmetallic minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.< 

manufactures 



In 



(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by Industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


12Cl 


1311 


132 


138^ 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148^ 


149 


149 
M 


Alabama, total 

No employees 

1-4 employees 

5-9 employees .... 

10-19 employees . . 
20-49 employees . . 
50-99 employees . . 
100-249 employees 

250-499 employees 
500-999 employees 

COUNTIES 

Baldwin: 

0-19 employees 

Barbour: 

0-19 employees . . . 
20-99 employees . . 

Bibb: 

0-19 employees . . . 
20-99 employees . . 

Blount: 

0-19 employees . . . 
20-99 employees . . 
100-249 employees 

Butler: 

0-19 employees . . . 
20-99 employees.. 

Calhoun: 

0-19 employees . . . 

Chambers : 

0-19 employees . . . 

Cherokee: 

0-19 employees . . . 

Chilton: 

20-99 employees . . 

Choctaw: 

0-19 employees . . . 

Clarke: 

0-19 employees 

Cleburne: 

20-99 employees . . 

Colbert: 

0-19 employees . . . 
20-99 employees . . 

Conecuh: 

0-19 employees . . . 

Covington: 

0-19 employees. . . 

Crenshaw: 

0-19 employees . . . 
20-99 employees . . 

Cullman: 

0-19 employees . . . 

Dallas: 

0-19 employees . . . 


357 
45 
89 
62 

70 

51 

17 

8 

11 
4 

6 

4 

1 

6 

1 

10 
2 

1 

6 
1 

6 

1 

1 

1 

6 

4 

1 

2 
2 

2 

1 

1 
1 

4 

3 
2 


316 
45 
70 
53 

65 

46 

16 

6 

11 

4 

6 

4 

1 

6 

1 

9 
2 

1 

6 

1 

4 

1 

1 

1 

6 

4 

1 

2 
2 

2 

1 

1 
1 

4 

1 
2 


41 

19 
9 

5 
5 
1 
2 


30 

8 
5 
4 

1 
4 

3 
1 

3 

1 








2 




1 




147 

5 

33 

36 

33 

20 

5 

4 

8 
3 

4 

7 
1 
1 

3 


4 
2 

2 


42 

26 

7 

4 

1 
3 
1 




9 

2 

1 

4 
2 


3 
2 

1 


3 

1 


26 

3 
3 

8 
6 

5 

1 


12 

2 

1 

3 
5 

1 


33 
1 

12 
3 

8 
9 


3 

1 
1 

1 


14 
1 
6 

1 

5 

1 


23 

15 
7 

1 




1 
1 


4 

1 

1 

1 
1 










































1 
1 




1 






















2 
















































































































2 


... 


2 










1 


... 


1 
1 


... 


... 


... 


... 






2 








1 
1 




... 






















































1 




1 














1 




















































2 


1 






















1 














































































6 


























































































2 


2 


























1 


1 


1 


1 




























1 






































1 
1 
















































































4 
1 




2 
2 


















































1 




















































1 
1 
































1 
2 

1 

1 


... 






















































































1 




























































1 








































































































1 
1 


























2 


























2 






2 










20-99 employees.. 





























^See table 3, footnote 2. 



ALABAMA 



1-11 



Tabic 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries-' 



In- 
cluded 

in 

mEuiu- 

fac- 

tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



10^ 



105 



106 



108^ 



109 



120 



120' 



131^ 



132 



138^ 



Ul 



142 



144 



145 



147 



1481 



149 



149 

M 



COUNTIES — Continued 

De Kalb: 

0-19 employees .... 

Elmore: 

20-99 employees . . . 

Escambia: 

0-19 employees . — 

Etowah: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Fayette: 

0-19 employees .... 

Franklin: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 

Greene: 

0-19 employees .... 

Hale: 

0-19 employees .... 

Houston: 

0-19 employees . 

Jackson: 

0-19 employees 

Jefferson: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 
250 employees 
and over 



Lamar: 

0-19 employees 

Lawrence : 

0-19 employees . 

Lee: 

0-19 employees 

Macon: 

0-19 employees 

Madison: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees — 

Marengo: 

0-19 employees .... 

Marion: 

0-19 employees . . . . 
20-99 employees . . . 

Marshall: 

0-19 employees .... 

Mobile: 

0-19 employees . 

20-99 employees . . . 

Monroe : 

0-19 employees . - . . 

Montgomery: 

0-19 employees . . . . 
20-99 employees . . . 

Morgan: 

0-19 employees . . . . 
20-99 employees 

Pickens: 

0-19 employees . . . . 

Pike: 

0-19 employees . . . . 
20-99 employees . . . 



10 



15 



^See table 3, footnote 2. 



1-12 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4. -Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries 1 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


12C^ 


1311 


132 


1381 


Ul 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


lAA 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


1481 


149 


149 
M 


COUNTIES— Continued 

Randolph: 

0-19 employees 

Russell: 

0-19 employees.... 

St. Clair: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Shelby: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Sumter: 

0-19 employees .... 

Talladega: 

0-19 employees . 

20-99 employees . . . 
100-2*49 employees. 

Tuscaloosa: 

0-19 employees. . . . 
20-99 employees... 


1 

3 

1 

13 
9 

1 

1 
1 
2 

11 
-4 

25 
8 

2 

1 
2 


1 

1 
1 

12 
6 

1 

1 
1 
1 

11 

2A 
8 

2 

1 

2 

34 
1 




















9 
3 

6 
3 

21 
6 

2 


1 
2 




























1 




3 

2 

1 

1 
3 






















1 














1 


3 
2 






























































1 

1 
3 






























1 
3 






2 




























































1 




























































































1 
1 


::: 




















































































3 


























































Walker: 

0-19 employees .... 


































1 

1 


... 










20-99 employees . . . 
250 employees 
and over 




































































Washington: 

0-19 employees .... 

Wilcox: 

0-19 employees .... 




















22 




A 

1 

2 

12 
1 




































































Winston: 

0-19 employees .... 












































Undistributed: 

0-19 employees .... 












































20-99 employees ^ 





























































































iSee table 3, footnote 2. 



ARIZONA 

2-1 



2-2 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES— AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining by County: 1958 



ARIZONA 



EMPLOYMENT 

8000 - 12000 

4000- 7999 — 

2000 - 3999 — 

1000- 1999 — 

500 - 999 — 

200 - 499 — 

25- 199 — 

^ MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

Q INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 



RANK AMONG STATES 
EMPLOYMENT -]4 
VALUE OF SHIPMENTS -16 




SCALE 
20 «) 60 SO lOO MILES 
' ■ ' ' I I ' 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



MINING IN ARIZONA 
Employment For Industry Group By County: 1958 



2-? 



Nonmelallic Minerals Mining 




Employment in Mining 

Including Mining in Manufactures: 1902-1958 
ARIZONA 



20 





























B^SJSSSSI OTHER INDUSTRIES 
l^^l METAL MINING 





















































1902 1909 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



1929 

CENSUS YEAR 



195', 1958 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



2-4 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 1— General Statistics for Mineral Operations: 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of colunm captions see Introduction. For more detailed historical statistics for this rftate, see table 1 of the corresponding 
chapter of the 1954 Census of Mineral Industries, Vol. II. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 



Kind of operation 
and year 



Establish- 
ments, 
number 



To- 
tal 



20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All employees 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 
added 

in 
mining 



($1,000) 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
in- 
staUfid 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ^ 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



Energy used 

(kwh 
equivalent) 



(mil- 
lion) 



Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 



Mineral industries 
only: 

1958 

1954 

Including operations 
in manufactures: 

1958 

19545 

1939* 

1929^ 

1919' 

1909' 

1902' 



320 
525 



338 
533 
'179 
236 

250 

4A5 

'494 



43 

37 

(MA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



15,283 
13,231 



15,609 
13,290 
10,389 
18,875 

17,673 

16,014 

8,400 



79,872 
66,584 



81,473 
66,776 
17,066 
33,514 

30,454 

17,442 

8,559 



12,136 
11,014 



12,462 

11,073 

9,400 

17,274 

16,066 
15,146 
^7,569 



24,540 
25,169 



25,189 

25,286 

22,059 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



61,656 
53,889 



63,257 
54,081 
14,561 
29,209 

27,421 

15,970 

7,389 



189,015 
-178,139 



195,533 

2 179, 001 

40,560 

91,513 

64,591 

19,531 

6,855 



57,951 
48,515 



^59,168 

^48,748 

13,540 

23,709 

21,392 

12,907 

3,985 



7,973 
1,078 



7,973 

1,078 

(NA) 

(NA) 

1,528 

1,370 

(NA) 



18,412 
30,428 



^18,412 

30,428 

130 

1,256 

967 
410 
357 



6,012 
9,154 



■^6,012 

"^9,154 

(NA) 

7,404 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



249,442 
2 217, 936 



257,177 

^219,031 

54,230 

116,478 

88,478 
34,218 
11,197 



29,921 
47,867 



'29,921 
'47,867 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



'^579 
3,747 



"^3,747 
2,372 
3,735 

^°2,912 
(NA) 
(NA) 



377 
340 



"367 
338 
252 
216 

181 
(NA) 
(NA) 



NA Not available. -"^Revised. 

■^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of miner- 
als produced and used in the same establishment. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of shipments (or production for 1919 and 
1909) and contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for preparation. The approximate magni- 
tude of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other years, the figures represent net 
production and exclude this duplication. 

^Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 

■'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is included 
with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

'Excludes data for stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operation in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants, if any, operated In conjunction with 3 dimension stone quarries. 

''Represents number of mines and quarries. 

^Excludes data for establishments in the Oil and Gas Extraction Industries, if any. 

'Excludes data for sand and gravel mining establishments and, except for 1902, for stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime plants. 
In 1929, there were 3 such sand and gravel establishments with products valued at $82 thousand, and 2 such stone quarries. 

■"■^Excludes purchased electricity. For 1929, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to only 4 percent of the total kwh equivalent of energy 
used. 

■'■•'■Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 



ARIZONA 



2-5 



Tabic 2A.-Gcncral Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of oolunn captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
Code 



Industry group and industry 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Total 



Wi th 
JO or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All employees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development, workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 

($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplieo, 
etc. and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



)9y. 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added In 

mining 



($1,000) 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures. 



10 

1021 

1031 

106 

1062 

108 

109 
1094 

12 
13 



K 



1A21 



1441 



149 
1499 



Metal mining 

Copper ores 

Lead and zinc ores. 
Ferroalloy ores: 
Manganese ores... 



Metal mining services. 



Miscellaneous metal ores 

Uranlum-radium-vanadium ores . . 

Bituminous coal mining and Oil and 
gas extraction 



Nonmetallic minerals niining.. 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures. 



Crushed and broken stone 
(Mineral industry only) . 



Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures. 



Miscellaneous minerals, 
Nonmetallic minerals. 



nee. 
nee. 



338 

320 

18 

202 
56 
22 

63 

5 

43 
35 



25 

111 
93 
18 



15,609 
15,283 
'326 



3. 



14,682 

13,072 

416 

378 

278 

523 
507 



66 

861 

535 

'326 



58 

390 

108 

^282 

281 
222 



81,473 
79,872 
'1,601 

77,922 

70,509 

2.264 



1,432 
1.424 



2,256 

2,220 



276 

3,275 
1,674 
'1.601 



201 

1,761 

360 

'1,401 

832 
587 



12,462 

12 136 

^326 

11,604 

10,158 

355 

335 

255 

487 
473 



53 

805 

479 

'326 



49 

378 

96 

'282 

250 
201 



25,189 

24,540 

649 

23,590 

20,694 

763 

580 

538 

998 
978 



97 

1,502 
853 
649 



85 

712 
149 
563 

466 
379 



63,257 

61,656 

1,601 

60,045 

53,592 

1,880 

1,222 

1,281 

2,036 
2,007 

188 

3,024 
1,423 
1,601 

170 

1,726 
325 

1,401 

660 

471 



195,533 

189,015 

6,518 

185,566 

165,569 

4,077 

4,031 

3,789 

8,047 
7,980 



( = ) 

10,926 
4,408 
6,518 



519 

6,280 

993 

5,287 

2,258 
1.092 



'91,565 
90,348 
^1,217 

86,370 

72,408 

2,334 

4,021 

1,701 

5,873 
5,804 



1,862 

^3,333 

2,116 

^1,217 



283 

^1,435 

516 

2 919 

1,007 
570 



'257,177 

249,442 

'7,735 

243,456 

211,936 

6,241 

7,275 

5,075 

12,897 
12,855 



203 

'13,518 

5,783 

'7,735 



745 

'7,564 

1,358 

'6,206 

2,861 
1.454 



(NA) 

29,921 

(NA) 

28,480 

26,041 

170 

777 

415 

1,023 
929 



700 

(NA) 

741 

(NA) 



57 

(NA) 

151 

(NA) 

404 
208 



13,290 

13,231 

'59 

12,693 

11 492 

(NA) 

201 

75 

359 
340 



(') 



"597 

*538 

'59 



'72 

(NA) 

121 

(NA) 

180 
(NA) 



* 179, 001 

* 178, 139 

862 

* 174, 384 

165,668 

(NA) 

2,519 

977 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(*) 

'4,617 

*3,755 

862 



'793 

(NA) 

1,349 

(NA) 

1,126 
(NA) 



NA Not available. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^For stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machinery installed. 
For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the number of production and development 
workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same figures are 
included for production and development workers and for all employees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes the estimated 
value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment at such operations. 

^Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 

'Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded the value of ship- 
ments and receipts and capital expenditures. 

'Data for Bituminous Coal Mining and Oil and Gas Extraction are included with the data for Nonmetallic Minerals Mining. 

'includes data for mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 



2-6 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries; 1958 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group and Industry 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Total 



Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 



Total 



De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machiji- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 



Net shipments of primary products'' 



By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



10 

1021 

1031 

106 

1062 

108 

109 
1094 

12 
13 

14 



All mineral industries 

Metal mining 

Copper ores 

Lead and zinc ores 

Ferroalloy ores : 

Manganese ores 

Metal mining services 

Miscellaneous metal ores 

Uranium-radium- vanadium ores , 

Bituminous coal mining and 
Oil and gas extraction 

Nonmetallio minerals mining 



90,348 

86,370 

72,408 

2,334 



4,021 
1,701 



5,873 
5,804 



1,862 
2,116 



57,951 

363,845 

^53,643 

^1,798 



^2,171 
1,174 



^5,036 
^4,980 



504 
'1,575 






C) 






C) 



18,412 

16,906 

14,469 

493 



1,305 
112 

517 
508 



1,294 
212 



6,012 

5,619 

4,296 

43 



545 
415 



320 
316 



64 
329 



29,921 

28,480 

26,041 

170 



777 
415 

1,023 
929 



700 
741 



10,396 

9,669 

8,936 

34 



129 



554 
528 



617 
110 



19,525 

18,811 

17,105 

136 



648 

415 



469 
401 



83 
631 



XXX 

'^56,525 
"384 



6 140 

XXX 
XXX 

''222 



XXX 
XXX 



XXX 

205,266 
'6,125 



6,707 
(NA) 

XXX 

■^6,864 



XXX 

XXX 



(NA) 
(NA) 



XXX 

(NA) 



XXX 
XXX 



XXX 

(D) 



(NA) 

XXX 

XXX 
XXX 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

NA Not available. 

•'■Represents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

^The cost of minerals received for preparation is included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

*Re presents thousands of tons of crude ore mined and is not directly comparable with the figure for value of shipments in the succeeding column. 

'The value of shipments of primary products by establishments classified in other industries is included with the value of shipments of primary 
products by establishments classified in the specified industry. The figure shown represents gross shipments and includes the value of shipments of 
lead and zinc ores and old tailings to mills. 

^Represents thousands of long tons . 

''Represents gross value of shipments of crude ore only. 



ARIZONA 



2-7 



Table 2C— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group or Industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Total 



Mining only 



Total 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods ^ 



Mines with preparation plants 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 


Nonpro 


rately 


duclng 


oper- 


estab- 


ated 


lish- 


prepa- 


ments 


ration 




plants 





10 



1021 



1031 



1062 



1094 



12 
13 



All industries: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Metal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Copper ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Lead and zinc ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Manganese ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Uranium-radium-vanadium ores : 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Bituminous coal mining and Oil and 
gas extraction: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Nonmetallic minerals mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining only $1,000.. 



311 
14,990 

185,088 



197 
U,404 

181,777 



56 

13,072 

165,569 



22 
416 

4,077 



63 
378 

4,031 



35 

507 

7,980 



{') 



=4,408 



233 
14,748 

187,331 



139 
14,202 

182,836 



37 
12,976 

166,095 



11 
364 

4,521 



55 
361 

4,027 



26 

493 

8,023 



*225 



'4,408 



152 
(D) 

(D) 



97 
(D) 

(D) 



21 
1,089 

10,927 



38 
(D) 

(D) 



25 
(D) 

(D) 



*225 



52 



(D) 



54 
1,414 

15,058 



49 
1,390 

14,986 



12 
1,073 



10,510 



473 



9 
107 



18 

150 

2,975 



2 
(D) 



268 
3,781 



45 
136 

1,938 



417 



10 
(D) 

(D) 



3 

(D) 

(D)' 



893 



585 



(D) 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



43 
132 

1,843 



1 

(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



6 
(D) 

158 



■77 
12,752 

163,725 



38 
(D) 

(D) 



16 
11,887 

155,168 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



15 
189 

2,134 



15 
5,108 

41 , 308 



11 
4,973 

40,708 



5 
(D) 

(D) 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



55 
7,552 

121,821 



26 
7,397 

120,605 



11 
(D) 



(D) 



13 
(D) 

(D) 



39 
382 

(D) 



4 
135 



600 



29 

155 

1,216 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



6 
92 

(D) 



4 
CD) 

CD) 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
CD) 

CD) 



78 
242 



58 
202 



19 
96 

C^) 



11 

52 



2 

CD) 


8 

17 


CD) 


4 


1 
(D) 


9 

14 


(D) 


C^) 



20 
40 

(') 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

^Includes data for 6 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
^Includes data for 2 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 

^Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded value of ship- 
ments and capital expenditures. 

^Includes data for the Oil and Gas Field Services Industries, 
'includes data for the Nonmetallic Minerals Services Industries. 



2-8 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Group, for Counties: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 

or more 

en^jloy- 

ees 



All enployees 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
purchased 
machinery 
installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



195A^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added 

in 

Tn■^^ ^^^g 
($1,000) 



10 



10 



10 
102 



10 
106 

13 



ARIZONA: 

All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures.. 

COUNTIES 

Apache : 

Including oil and gas 

extraction 

Excluding oil and gas 

extraction 



Cochise (mineral industries 
only) 

Coconino 

Metal mining 

Gila 

Nonmetallic minerals mining. 

Graham 

Maricopa, total 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures.. 
Metal mining 

Mohave 

Navajo (mineral industries 
only) 

Pima (mineral industries only) 

Metal mining 

Copper ores 

Pinal (mineral industries 
only) 

Yavapai (mineral industries 
only) 

Yuma (mineral industries only) 

Metal mining 

Ferroalloy ores 

Undistributed 



338 

320 

18 



28 



15,609 

15 283 

^326 



274 
250 



298 
241 

2,166 
180 

19 

526 

252 

■^274 

203 

104 



92 

2,467 
2,405 
2,151 

4,801 

713 

115 

106 

85 



81,473 
79,872 

''i.eoi 



1,148 
1,029 



(D) 

1,371 
1,232 

(D) 
506 

111 

2,463 

1,121 

*1,342 

907 

430 



359 

12,628 
12,458 
11,334 



(D) 



(D) 

430 
394 
304 

24 



12,462 

12,136 

''326 



(NA) 
243 

999 

265 
211 

1,753 
166 

18 

493 

219 

■^274 

174 

76 

86 

2,059 
2,006 
1,771 

3,937 

619 

108 
99 
79 

(NA) 



25,189 

24,540 

649 



(NA) 
478 

(D) 

519 
446 

(D) 
337 

40 

946 
400 
546 
309 

138 



212 

4,275 
4,204 
3,722 



(D) 



(D) 

196 
181 
142 

(NA) 



63,257 

61,656 

1,601 



(NA) 
986 



(D) 

1,179 
1,054 

(D) 
425 

104 

2,272 
929 

1,343 
734 

308 



320 

10,4^4 

10,300 

9,280 



(D) 



(D) 

382 
346 
264 

(NA) 



195,533 

189,015 

6,518 



(NA) 
2,188 



(D) 

5,645 
4,809 

(D) 
1,081 

125 

7,522 
2,699 
4,823 
2,197 

551 



1,869 

37,047 
36,682 
34,246 



(D) 

(D) 

1,390 

1,239 

782 

(NA) 



^91,565 
90,348 
^1,217 



(NA) 
1,452 



(D) 

4,763 
4,452 

(D) 
676 

122 

^3,902 

3 030 

^872 

2,842 

296 



(D) 

24,402 

24,167 

(D) 



(D) 



(D) 

1,099 

1,052 

919 

(NA) 



*257,177 

249,442 

■^7,735 



3,729 
3,513 

(D) 

9,801 
8,703 

(D) 
1,497 

242 

* 11, 016 

5,321 

*5,695 

4,722 

718 

1,699 

48,190 
47,633 
43,582 

(D) 

(D) 

2,172 
1,992 
1,486 

51 



(NA) 

29,921 

(NA) 



(NA) 
127 



(D) 

607 
558 

(D) 
260 



*408 
408 

(NA) 
317 

129 



(D) 

13,259 

13,216 

(D) 



(D) 



(D) 

317 
299 
215 

(NA) 



13,290 

13,231 

*59 



315 
(NA) 

1,816 

72 
38 

2,982 
138 

45 

174 
167 

1? 

56 

74 



37 

1,840 
(NA) 
(NA) 



2,862 



700 

102 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



^179,001 

'178,139 

862 



(NA) 
(NA) 



(D) 

5 210 
543 

=33,771 
874 

=285 

'1,894 

'1 714 

^180 

'504 

'647 



'38 

34,305 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(D) 

9,600 

'1,772 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

NA Not available. 

■"■Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Companies operating oil and gas field properties were permitted to make only one report for all oil and gas field operations in each State. Com- 
panies engaged only in performing oil and gas field or other mining services were permitted to make only one report for all States; these reports were 
classified on the basis of the principal State in which the service was performed. For 1958, such reports contained employment on March 15 and select- 
ed other data by State and county. For such operations, the State total figures shown for number of establishments represent the number of reports 
received which were classified in the State and those shown for number of establishments in a county represent ■the number of reports that indicated 
any operations in the specified county. All county statistics shown which were not reported separately were obtained by allocating the totals reported 
for each company on the basis of the reported county da^ta. 

^For stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machinery Installed. 

'^See table 2A, footnote 3. 

'Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 

^Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay m-lTi-iTig operations in manufacturing establishments. 



ARIZONA 



2-9 



Tabic 4 —Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 19 58 



101 
102 
103 
10* 
105 
106 
108 
109 
120 



Iron ores 

Copper ores 

Lead and zlxic ores 

Gold and silver ores 

Bauxite 

Ferroalloy ores 

Metal mining services 

Miscellaneous metal ores 

Bituminous coal 



12C Coal mining services 

131 Crude petroleum end natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

I'll Dimension stone 

l<flM Dimension stone In manufactures 

1^2 Crushed and broken stone 

l'»2M Crushed and broken stone In manufactures 

144 Sand and gravel 



l-WM Sand and gravel in manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

W5M Clay and related ndnerale in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonnetallic minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c. In 

manufactures 







(Counties and s 


Ize 


classes 


ji which 


no 


mineral operations were 


reported 


are 


omitted) 


















All mineral operations 


Number of operations by Industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied In 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108' 


109 


120 


12C' 


1311 


132 


138' 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 

M 


144 


144 

M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148' 


149 


149 
M 


Arizona , total 


338 
98 

135 
30 

32 

16 

9 

5 

4 
4 

^4 

^1 

21 

1 
1 

15 
2 

37 
3 

32 
4 

3 

5 

1 
1 

36 
5 

1 

22 

1 

10 
1 

35 
6 


320 
98 

125 
27 

30 

15 

8 

4 

4 
4 

^4 

^1 

21 

1 
1 

14 
2 

37 
3 

32 

4 

3 

5 

1 
1 

30 
4 

22 

1 

9 

1 

32 

5 


18 

10 
3 

2 
1 
1 
1 




56 

15 

19 

2 

3 
2 

1 
1 

4 
4 

^4 

^1 


22 
3 

10 
2 

3 
3 

1 


11 
5 

6 




65 

25 

22 

6 

4 
7 
1 


5 
1 

2 

1 
1 


43 

17 

12 

6 

2 
2 

3 

1 


2 

1 
1 

1 
1 


... 


21 

16 

2 

1 

2 




2 

2 


18 

7 

10 


1 


15 
2 
9 
2 

2 


3 

1 
1 

1 


33 
5 

22 
2 

4 


11 


3 


3 


2 


2 


20 
2 
9 

1 

5 




1-4 employees 

5-9 employees 


5 
2 

2 


1 
2 


3 


1 
1 


1 
1 




10-19 employees . . . 






1 






















1 

1 










3 




100-249 employees . 


























250-499 employees . 




























500-999 employees . 












































1,000-2,499 

employees 

2,500 employees 






















































































COUNTIES 

Apache: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 

Cochise: 

0-19 employees 

250 employees 












8 

1 
1 

1 


3 




6 










2 




2 




















































































1 


... 


4 
2 


2 


... 




2 


2 






1 


1 




1 


1 


































Coconino: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 

Gila: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 
250 employees 








7 


3 


12 
3 

6 








7 




2 




2 












3 




























... 


... 


5 
2 

3 

1 


1 


2 




6 


3 








1 




1 












1 





6 
2 






















































Graham: 

0-19 employees 

Greenlee : 

0-19 employees 

250 employees 


1 


... 


... 


... 


2 

1 






























1 
































6 

1 
1 


... 


1 








































Maricopa: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 

Mohave : 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 

Navajo: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees... 

Pima: 

0-19 employees 




1 




11 
4 


2 


2 


2 






1 





3 




7 
2 


5 
1 
1 




1 






1 










































1 


1 


3 




5 
1 


2 


3 

1 
1 


1 










1 








1 


1 
















1 
















2 




1 


1 




4 












































3 

1 


... 


8 
1 
1 

3 


4 
2 


3 




1 


3 
2 












3 




9 


1 




2 


... 




1 
















100-249 employees. 
250 employees 
and over 






























3 3 






































... 





'see table 3, footnote 2. 



'Revised. 



2-10 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4.-Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 







(Counties and size 


classes 


in which 


no 


mineral operat 


ions were 


reported 


are 


omitted ) 


















All mineral operations 


Number of operations by Industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


state, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied In 
mineral 
indus- 
tries-^ 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


12Cl 


131^ 


132 


138^ 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


14^ 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


145^ 


149 


149 
M 


COUNTIES— Cont inued 

Pinal: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 
250 employees 


25 

1 

3 

8 

1 

36 

1 
1 

1 

25 
3 

22 


24 

1 

3 

7 

1 

35 

1 
1 

1 

24 
3 

22 


1 




7 


3 






4 
1 


3 




... 


... 






1 










2 


1 










4 






















1 
1 


... 


3 
2 

9 






































Santa Cruz: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . , 

Yavapai: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 
250 employees 


3 

1 

2 






2 






















1 








































1 


... 


5 


2 


4 


... 






7 




2 


1 


2 












1 
1 
















1 


... 


1 
2 


1 
















































































Yuma: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees... 

Undistributed: 

0-19 employees .... 


1 


1 


... 


14 
2 


1 


... 


... 


... 


... 


1 




1 




3 


1 


... 


. . . 




1 


. > • 


■ • • 














15 


... 


7 





































































^See table 3, footnote 2. 



ARKANSAS 

3-1 



3-2 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES— AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining by County: 1958 



ARKANSAS 



RANK AMONG STATES 
EMPLOYMENT - 26 
VALUE OF SHIPMENTS -25 



^ MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

Q INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 




8000- 12000 


--^_^ 


4000- 7999 y^^ 


2000- 3999 — -J«|!§!i 


1000 1999 


^iiii 


500 - 999 


^iii 


200 - 499 ^1 


^^i^ 


25- 199 — ^' 





U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COAAMERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



MINING IN ARKANSAS 

Employment For Industry Group By County: 1958 



3-3 



Metal Mining 




Oil and Gas Extraction 



Geoeral Extent ot Oil and Gas FteWs 



Coal Mining 




General Extent of Coal Fields 




Nonmetallic Minerals Mining 




9 urNERAt INDUSTRIES 

O INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 



U. S. DB>Atnt*£HT OF COMMBKIE 




BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



100 1000 2 500 5.000 

Number of £'r:plQy^i 



7500 10000 



3-4 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining 

including Mining in Manufactures: 1902-1958 
ARKANSAS 



m OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION 
^ (Not ovallable for 1929) 

NONMETALLIC MINERALS MINING 
METAL MINING 
COAL MINING 




/902 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



/909 



1919 1929 

CENSUS YEAR 



1939 



1954 1958 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



ARKANSAS 



3-5 



Tabic 1— General Statistics for Mineral Operations: 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of colum captions see Introduction. For more detailed historical statistics for this State, see table 1 of the corresponding 
chapter of the 1954 Census ol" Mineral Industries, Vol. II. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operatlona) 





Establish- 
ments, 
number 






Production 


and 


Value 
added 

In 
mining 

($1,000) 


Selected expenses ($1,000) 


Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ' 

($1,000) 


Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 

($1,000) 


Energy used 

(kwh 
equivalent) 






development workers 


Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
olec- 
tricity 


Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 


Con- 
tract 
work 


Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
tn- 
stallfid 


Kind of operation 
and year 


To- 
tal 


20 

or 

more 

em- 
ploy- 
ees 


Number 


Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 


Number 


Man- 
hours 

a.ooo) 


Wages 
($1,000) 


Total 

(mil- 
lion) 


Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 


Mineral Industries 
only: 

1958 

1954 

Including operations 
in manufactures: 
All operations: 

1958 

1954'' 

1939* 

1919^° 


443 
410 

463 
423 

5 307 
126 
121 

^26 

169 

155 

'143 

128 

119 
117 


61 
67 

66 
72 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

34 
37 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


5,302 
5,910 

5,635 
6,131 
7,477 
3,964 
5,183 
3,156 

2,829 
3,392 
4,315 
5,381 
3,924 
5,170 


23,425 
22,483 

24,587 
22,977 
8,734 
5,175 
3,270 
2,139 

11,180 
12,017 
3,668 
5,726 
5,119 
3,255 


4,074 
4,985 

4,399 
5,206 
6,926 
3,630 
4,941 
^2,945 

2,361 
3,033 
4,026 
5,030 
3,614 
4,939 


7,924 
9,986 

8,525 

10,425 

10,737 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

4,584 

6,221 

5,518 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 


16,362 
17,501 

17,503 
17,995 
7,446 
4,573 
3,031 
1,946 

8,749 
10,213 
3,117 
4,917 
4,546 
3,030 


110,530 
'107, 90; 

114,459 

'110,107 

22,150 

6,423 

3,973 

2,591 

34,128 
'40,022 
5,793 
9,558 
6,135 
3,962 


^19,858 
19,951 

2 '20,530 

'20,386 

4,040 

1,677 

510 

244 

2 '7,828 

'9,222 

1,560 

1,703 

1,591 

473 


^3,456 
*2,085 

^3,456 

*2,085 

(NA) 

"166 

(NA) 

946 
(NA) 
(NA) 


11,084 
12,855 

'11P94 

512,855 

5,158 

139 

121 
5 

'533 

'2,258 

54 

107 

57 

43 


7,814 
7,139 

'7,816 
'7,139 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

«2,981 
'2,637 
(NA) 
619 
(NA) 
(NA) 


136,473 
'136,241 

141,084 

'138,879 

31,348 

8, '405 

4,604 

2,840 

42,515 

'52,749 

7,407 

11,368 
7,783 
4,478 


16,269 
13,690 

^16,271 
'13,690 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

'2,955 
'2,333 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


''3,750 
3,793 

^^,752 

'3,793 

3 306 

1^690 

(NA) 

(NA) 

^«to5 

'610 

402 

504 

^2667 

(NA) 


^920 
761 

''853 
729 
477 
190 


1909^° 


(NA) 


1902^' 


(NA) 


Excluding oil and 
gas extraction 
industries: 
1958 


"^172 


1954' 


201 


1939 


100 


1929^' 


100 


1919^° 


185 


1909^° 


(NA) 







■"■For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of minerals 
produced and used in the same establishments in making manufactured products. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of shipments (or 
production for 1919 and 1909) and contains sane duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for preparation. 
The approximate magnitude of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other years, 
represents net production and excludes this duplication. For years prior to 1958, excludes the value of residue gas from natural gas liquids plants. 

^For Metal Mining Industries, the cost of minerals received for preparation is included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and 
purchased fuels and electricity. 

'Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium- Vanadium Ores Industry. 

^Excludes the cost of natural gas processed at natural gas liquids plants, but includes the estimated value prior to processing of natural gas 
liquids contained in such gas. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is Included 
with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

^Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 
'Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Includes data for one or two establishments primarily engaged in oil and gas field hauling. Such operations were not classified in the mineral 
industries for 1954 and 1958. 

'Represents number of mines and quarries, number of natural gas liquids plants, and, for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services 
industries, number of operating companies. 

^"Excludes data for sand and gravel operations and stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime plants. In 1929, there were 16 such sand and 
gravel establishments, with products valued at $1,572 thousand, and 3 such stone quarries at lime plants. See also footnote 15. For 1919, also excludes 
data for 2 nonproducing establishments. For "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries" in 1909, except for number of establishments, includes data 
for one nonproducing establishment in these indiistries. 
■"■^Represents cost of gas purchased for resale. 

■"■^Excludes purchased electricity. For 1929, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to only 3 percent of the total kwh equivalent of energy 
used. 

■"•'Excludes data for sand, gravel, common clay, and shale operations. Includes data for lime plants producing lime valued at $83 thousand. No oil 
and gas extraction operations were reported for 1902, hence, these figures are also comparable with those shown for later years for "Excluding oil and 
gas extraction industries." 

■"■^Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 

^'Excludes data for ccmmon clay and shale operations. In 1939, there were 10 such clay and shale mines, with products valued at $80 ■thousand. 
^Re^vised . 



3-6 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 





. 1 

Industry group and industry- 


1958 




19541 




Establish- 
ments, number 


All enployees 


Production and 
development workers 


Value 

added in 

mining 

($1,000) 


Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 


Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 


Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 

($1,000) 


All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 




Ind. 
code 


Total 


With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 


Number 


Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 


Number 


Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 


Wages 
($1,000) 


Value 

added in 

mining 

($1,000) 




All mineral operations 


463 

443 

20 

70 
18 
19 
29 

294 

210 

205 

5 

9 

75 

34 

38 

99 
79 
20 
20 
15 
5 

12 

9 

34 

9 
4 


66 
61 

5 

16 
8 
4 
4 

32 
22 
20 
2 
3 
7 
5 

2 

18 

13 

5 

2 

"2 

3 

6 

1 
2 


5,635 

5.302 
S333 

1,149 
632 
239 
252 

2,806 
1,905 
1,803 
102 
205 
696 
419 

271 

1,680 

1,347 

S333 

142 
71 
71 

67 

159 

389 

3137 
366 


24,587 
23,425 
3l,162 

5,216 

3,381 

552 

1,219 

13,407 
9,636 
9,221 
415 
1,242 
2,529 
1,594 

907 

5,964 

4,802 

3l,162 

268 

132 

136 

122 

465 

1,347 

3365 
1,485 


4,399 

4 074 

^325 

900 
447 
206 
228 

2,038 

1,229 

1,164 

65 

178 

631 

386 

241 

1,461 

1,136 

3325 

121 

58 

63 

54 

137 

329 

3132 
272 


8,525 

7,924 

601 

1,590 
813 
366 
388 

3,941 

2,348 

2,253 

95 

392 
1,201 

710 

481 

2,994 

2,393 

601 

168 

90 

78 

83 

304 

655 

269 
513 


17,503 

16,362 

1,141 

3,800 

2,182 

491 

1,081 

8,754 
5,476 
5,250 
226 
1,039 
2,239 
1,402 

816 

4,949 

3,808 

1,141 

225 

110 

115 

100 

399 

1,016 

320 
1,040 


114,459 

110,530 

3,929 

18,700 

15,023 

1,478 

2,081 

80,331 
70,497 
68,115 
2,382 
4,114 
5,720 
3,700 

1,863 

15,428 

11,499 

3,929 

465 

296 

169 

255 

1,281 

2,845 

109 
4,629 


=42,896 

42,212 

^684 

5,170 

3,607 

302 

1,205 

31,554 
22,582 
19,831 
2,751 
5,554 
3,418 
2,797 

557 

=6,172 

5,488 

^684 

182 

106 

76 

68 

643 

1,578 

=546 
1,272 


3141,084 

136,473 

34,611 

22,097 

17,241 

1,643 

3,086 

98,569 
81,986 
78,747 
3,239 
8,112 
8,471 
5,906 

2,34^ 

320,418 

15,807 

34,611 

605 

362 

243 

304 

1,780 

4,013 

3403 
5,731 


*16,271 

16,269 

^2 

1,773 

1,389 

137 

200 

13,316 

11,093 

9,199 

1,894 

1,556 

667 

591 

76 

*1,182 

1,180 

*2 

42 

40 

2 

19 

144 

410 

(NA) 
170 


6,131 

5,910 

^221 

1,549 
806 
145 
457 

2,739 

1,709 

1,651 

58 

258 

772 

262 

(NA) 

1,843 

1,622 

3221 

92 

92 
(NA) 

101 

427 

385 
(NA) 


'U0,107 
'107,904 


10 & 
12 


Included in manufactures..., 

\Metal mining and Bituminous 

/ coal mining 


2,203 
=17,431 


1051 


Bauxite 


12,383 


1062 
1211 


Ferroalloy ores (manganese ores) 
Bituminous coal 


881 
2,783 


13 
1311 


Oil and gas extraction , 

Crude petroleum and natural gas. 
Crude petroleum 


70,085 
61,194 
60 398 




Natural gas 


796 


1321 


Natural gas liquids 


*4 007 


138 

1381 

1389 


Oil and gas field services 

Drilling oil and gas wells .... 
Oil and gas field services, 
nee 


4,884 
2,301 

(NA) 

22,591 
20 388 


14 


Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Mineral indxistries 




Included in manufactures 

TMmen.si nn .=it.onp 


2,203 
303 


1411 


Mineral industry 




1441 


Included in manufactures.... 
Dimension stone, nee 
(mineral subindustry only) . . . 
Crushed and broken stone: 

Crushed and broken limestone 
(mineral subindustry only) . . . 
Sand and gravel (mineral 
industry only) 


303 
(NA) 

574 
3,139 


147 


Clay and related minerals: 

Clay and related minerals, nee. 
Chemical and fertilizer minerals 


(NA) 
(NA) 



NA Not available. 

■"■Excludes figures for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machinery 
Installed. 

For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the number of production and development 
workers was estimated from repor^ted figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same figures are 
included for production and development workers and for all en5)loyees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes the estimated 
value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment at such operations. 

Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 
^Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadiiim Ores Industry. 

*For 1954, no data were obtained on the cost of gas received for processing or on the value of residue gas. However, the estimated ■value, prior to 
processing, of such gas was used in eonputing value added in mining. 



ARKANSAS 



3-7 



Tabic 2B.-Sclcctcd Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



10 & 

12 
1051 

13 
1311 



1321 



138 
1381 



147 



Industry group and Industry 



All mineral industries. 



\Metal rnlTiing and Bituminous coal 

f mi nine 

Bauxite 



Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas 
Crude petroleum, 



Natural gas liquids. 



Oil and gas field services 

Drilling oil and gas wells... 



Nonmetalllo minerals mining. 

Chemical and fertilizer 
minerals .••.......•.••••• 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Total 



42,212 



5,170 
3,607 

31,554 
22,582 
19,831 

5,554 

3,418 
2,797 

5,488 



1,272 



Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 



'19,858 



*3,119 
*1,849 

12,702 
9,967 
8,852 

551 

2,184 
1,764 

4,037 



1,226 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 



'3,456 



(*) 
3,456 



3,456 



Con- 
tract 
work 



11,084 



398 

290 

10,561 
8,770 
7,287 

1,222 

569 
438 

125 



(D) 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



7,814 



1,653 
1,468 

4,835 
3,845 
3,692 

325 

665 
595 

1,326 



(D) 



Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 



Total 



16,269 



1,773 
1,389 

13,316 

11,093 

9,199 

1,556 

667 
591 

1,180 



170 



De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



5,867 



135 
(D) 

5,610 
5,516 
4,152 



122 



(D) 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 



10,402 



1,638 
(D) 

7,706 
5,577 
5,047 

1,556 

573 
515 

1,058 



(D) 



Net shipments of primary products^ 



By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



XXX 

1,361 

XXX 

XXX 

=26,890 
*2,267 

XXX 
XXX 



Value 



($1,000) 



XXX 

16,599 

XXX 

80,989 
76,642 

*5,390 

XXX 

■^5,920 



By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



XXX 

XXX 

5 272 



XXX 

XXX 



Value 



($1,000) 



XXX 

740 
740 



XXX 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

•'•Represents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received frcm other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

'Figures for minerals received for preparation In the Metal Mining Industries are Included with those for si5)plies, purchases for resale, and pur- 
chased fuels and electricity. 

*The cost of minerals received for preparation is Included •vd.'th the cost of s\5)plles, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

'Represents thousands of barrels of crude petroleum, field condensate, and drips shipped or used, 

^Represents net shipments of natural gas liquids only. Quantity figures are in thousands of barrels. 

''Figures for primary services performed in other industries are included with those for primary services performed in the specified industry. 



3-8 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 



(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Total 



Mining only 



Total 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods^ 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



Itader- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods 



Sepa- 
rately 
oper- 
ated 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 



Nonpro- 
ducing 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 



10 & 
12 



1051 



13 



lA 



U7 



All establishments: 

Number of establishments... 
Number of eigjloyees .,..,,., 
Value added in 
^|^T ^^ng $1,000. 

1 Metal mining and Bituminous 
/ coal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of en^iloyees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Bauxite: 

Number of establishments,,... 

Number of eii5ployees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Oil and gas extraction: 

Number of -establishments 

Number of en^lqyees 

Value added in 

^I^n^T1E $1 , 000. 

Nanmetallic minerals mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Chemical and fertilizer 
minerals : 

Number of establishments 

Number of ei^ployees 

Value added in 

Tn^m•^^E $1,000. 



366 
A,592 

104,700 



69 
3l,149 

318,700 



18 
632 

15,023 



219 
2,110 

74,611 



78 
^1,347 

'11,499 



4 
366 

4,629 



351 
4,540 

105,023 



64 
(D) 

(D) 



266 
2,640 

86,604 



37 
626 

14,917 



17 
(D) 

(D) 



210 
2,086 

74,959 



77 
(D) 

(D) 



4 
366 

4,629 



11 
(D) 

(D) 



201 
1,881 

70,845 



28 
133 

842 



13 
(D) 

(D) 



13 
(D) 

(D) 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



45 
388 



23 
(D) 

(D) 



7 
211 

3,864 



208 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



66 
1,589 

12,750 



21 
(D) 

(D) 



11 
347 

2,524 



(D) 
(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



50 
1,170 

9,721 



13 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



505 



19 
311 



5.669 



6 
(D) 



22 
(D) 

(D) 



201 
1,881 

70,845 



6 
(D) 



(D) 



45- 
(D) 

(D) 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 



37 
887 

7,504 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



505 



(D) 



5 
(D) 

(D) 



9 

205 



4.114 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



15 
52 

(^) 



5 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



9 

24 

( = ) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual coii?)anies. 

^Includes data for 4 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of TIl^■n^^^g was not specified. 

^Not shown since the cost of st^jplies, minerals received for preparation, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery 
installed exceeded capital expenditures. 

■'includes data for mining services operations. 



ARKANSAS 
Tabic 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



3-9 



1954 



Ind. 
code 



County and industry group 



1958 



Es tablishments^ 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 

or more 

enploy- 

ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
purchased 
machinery 
installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



1954^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 

number 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 



ARKANSAS: 

All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures.. 

COUNTIES 

Calhoun (including operations 
in manufactures ), 



liA 
131 
13 

131 
138 

1062 

12 

131 

138 

132 
& U 



131 



131 



131 



Clay. 



Columbia 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 



Canway. . . 
Crawford. 



FranVHn 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 



Heii5)stead, 



Independence (mineral 

industries only)..... 

Manganese ores 



Johnson (mineral industries 
only) 

Bituminous coal mining.... 



Lafayette, total 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Oil and gas field services 
Natural gas liquids and 
Nc3Dmetalllc minerals 
lining 



"I Nat 
>• No 
J ml 



Logan (mineral Industries 
only) 



Miller 

Crude petroleum, and 
natural gas 



Nevada 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas ,...,,., 



Ouachita 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 



Pope (mineral industries only) 

Pulosil (mineral Industries 
only) 



Saline. 



Sebastian (mineral industries 
omly) 

13 Dnion (mineral industries 

only), total 

131 Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

^See footnotes at end of table. 



463 

443 

20 



57 



10 
46 
23 
31 
17 
92 
67 
9 

17 
12 

23 

149 

94 

4 

51 



5,635 

5,302 

*333 



"30 
4 

556 

333 
41 
27 

113 
64 



205 
193 



108 
104 



204 



115 

84 

159 

58 

58 

46 

394 

291 

39 

352 
525 

195 

990 

730 

46 

214 



24,587 
23,425 
*1,162 



*133 

9 

2,699 

1,646 

151 

155 

435 

316 



500 
472 



463 
443 

1,067 

351 
66 



650 

273 
758 
287 
271 
227 
1,809 
1,438 
175 

1,583 
2,860 

950 

4,856 

3,815 
252 
789 



4,399 

4,074 

*325 



(NA) 
4 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



179 
170 



(NA) 
91 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



99 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

315 
364 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

42 

(NA) 



8,525 

7,924 

601 



(NA) 
5 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



312 
298 



(NA) 
148 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



223 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

657 
659 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

96 

(NA) 



17,503 

16,362 

1,141 



(NA) 
9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



452 
428 



(NA) 
375 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



533 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,368 
1,804 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
221 
(NA) 



114,459 

110,530 

3,929 



(NA) 
25 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,429 
1,337 



(NA) 
1,104 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



2,334 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

3,087 
14,078 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
406 
(NA) 



^42,896 

42,212 

%84 



(NA) 
(D) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



239 
177 



(NA) 
644 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



1,089 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
2,734 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
646 
(NA) 



''141,084 

136,473 

*4,6U 



*733 

29 

26,897 

20,413 

195 

170 

5,353 

4,942 

96 



1,564 
1,421 



1,924 
1,685 

17,4S7 

12,919 
1,204 



3,364 

609 

6,995 

5,297 

1,941 

1,672 

17,029 

16,053 

817 

5,046 
15,477 

1,516 

23,622 

19,238 
1,017 
3,367 



^16,271 

16,269 

= 2 



(NA) 
(D) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



104 
93 



(NA) 
63 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



59 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
1,335 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

35 

(NA) 



6,131 

5 910 

*221 



' '65 
(NA) 
■^579 
440 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



145 
130 



=172 
'147 

•'198 

58 
(NA) 



140 

'97 
'131 
(NA) 

'51 
(NA) 
'292 
(NA) 
(NA) 

'550 
809 

'272 

'720 

661 

49 

(NA) 



^110,107 

^107,904 

2,203 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



936 
851 



=1,260 
'1,121 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



2,595 

'473 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
11,951 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
562 
(NA) 



3-10 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 3.-General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954— Continued 



(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 





County and industry group 


1958 


1954^ 


Ind. 


Establishments, 
number 


All enployees 


Production and 
development workers 


Value 

added in 

mining 

($1,000) 


Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
installed 

($1,000) 


Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts' 

($1,000) 


Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 

($1,000) 


All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 


Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 


code 


Total 


With 20 
or more 
employ- 
ees 


Number 


Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 


Number 


Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 


Wages 
($1,000) 


13 


COUNTIES— Continued 
Undistributed, total 


59 

18 
41 


1 
1 


297 

220 
77 


1,399 

1,086 
313 


(MA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 


(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 


(M) 

(NA) 
(NA) 


(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 


(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 


1,021 
1,021 


(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 


(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 


(NA) 


131 


Crude petroleum and 


(NA) 


138 


Oil and gas field services.. 


(NA) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

NA Not available. 

^Excludes figures for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Companies operating oil and gas field properties were permitted to make only one report for all oil and gas field operatic^ns in each State. 
Companies engaged only in performing oil and gas field or other mining services were permitted to make only one report for all States; these reports 
were classified on the basis of the principal State in which the service was performed. For 1958, such reports contained enployment on March 15 and 
selected other data by State and county. For such operations, the State total figures shown for number of establishments represent the number of 
reports received which were classified in the State and those shown for number of establishments in a county represent the number of reports that 
indicated any operations in the specified county. All county statistics shown for such operations which were not reported separately were obtained 
by allocating the totals reported for each company on the basis of the reported county data. 

'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay m^n1ng operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased 
machinery installed. 

■^See table 2A, footnote 3. 

^Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, 

^Excludes data for the Uranuium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 

'^Excludes data for the Oil and Gas Field Services Industries. 

^Includes data for Tnini-ng operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'Represents the Bituminous Coal Industry only. 



ARKANSAS 



3-11 



Tabic 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Gold and silver ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 Metal mining services 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 
120 Bituminous coal 



12C Coal mining services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

141 Dimension stone 

141M Dimension stone in manufactures 

1A2 Crushed and broken stone 

142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 

144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel in nanufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonmetallic minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c, in 

manufactures 







(Counties and s 


ize 


classes 


in which 


no 


mine 


ral operations were 


repo 


rted 


are 


omitted) 


















All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


120^^ 


1311 


132 


138^ 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 

M 


147 


148^ 


149 


149 
M 


Arkansas , total 

No enployees 


463 
60 

187 
78 

72 

50 

7 

9 

1 

1 

2 

2 

1 

7 

1 

2 

3 

4 

1 

79 
8 

6 

1 

2 

5 

1 
1 
1 


443 
60 

178 
73 

71 

46 

7 

8 

1 

1 

2 

2 

1 

6 

1 

2 

3 

4 

1 

79 
8 

6 

1 

2 
5 

1 
1 
1 


20 

**9 

5 

1 
4 


1 

"i 


... 


1 


... 


18 
1 
6 
2 

1 
6 


19 
2 
7 
4 

2 
2 
2 


1 
"1 


1 

i 


29 
6 

12 
5 

2 

4 


... 


210 
34 

104 
24 

26 

17 

2 

3 

1 


9 

"i 

5 
2 

1 


75 

1 

24 

23 

20 
7 


15 
4 
5 
3 

3 


5 


15 
2 
3 
2 

4 

3 


3 

**i 

"2 


34 
5 

12 
8 

3 
5 

1 


4 


3 


8 


4 


1 


7 

5 
1 

1 


... 


1-4 eijiloyees 

5-9 eniployees 


2 

1 


2 


4 
4 


... 


1 


... 


10-19 engjloyees... 
20-49 enployees... 


... 


... 


1 


... 


... 


50-09 pmpl nypps . . . 










*i 


1 






... 


... 




100-249 en?)loyees. 


1 










2 








1 






COUNTIES 

Arkansas: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 




















Ashley: 

0-19 enployees .... 
































1 
2 
















Benton: 

0-19 employees .... 
















































Boone: 

0-19 eii?)loyees.... 

Bradley: 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 




... 


... 


... 


1 




1 
3 


1 




1 


... 


... 




... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


Calhoun: 

n-l 9 empl nyppR , , . . 


1 


























2 

1 
1 
1 
4 
1 


1 














Carroll: 

0-1 9 elltpT nypPH , . , . 






































Chicot: 

0-19 eii5)loyees.... 

Clark: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Clay: 

0-19 eiBloyees .... 

Cleveland: 

0-19 enployees.... 

Columbia: 

0-19 eB?)loyees.... 
20-99 en5)loyees... 

Conway: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 eii?)loyees... 

Craighead: 

0-19 enployees.... 

Crawford: 

0-19 employees .... 

Cross: 

0-19 eB5)loyees,... 

Dallas: 

0-19 enployees.... 

FauUmer: 

0-19 eii5)loyees.... 




















... 




1 
2 




































































































































... 




































44 
5 

4 


"2 


34 

1 

2 

1 
















1 


• • • 


... 






















































































































































2 

1 
1 


































1 


... 


... 

3 


















































































1 


... 


1 

















































































































^See table 3, footnote 2. 



3-12 MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 

Table 4-Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by Industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied In 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 


In- 
cluded 

In 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


12C^ 


131 1 


132 


138^ 


Ul 


Ul 
M 


142 


142 

M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148^ 


149 


149 
M 


COUNTIES— Continued 

FrnnVHn: 

0-19 eii5)loyees.... 
20-99 enjjloyees... 

Fulton: 

0-19 enployees,,,. 


7 

1 

1 
6 
1 
3 

5 

1 
2 

3 

1 

17 
5 

1 
2 

1 
1 

1 

15 
2 

55 
2 

1 

1 
1 

3 

1 

10 
2 

1 
3 

^5 

1 

1 


7 

1 

1 
6 

1 

3 

1 
1 
2 

1 

16 
3 

1 
2 

1 
1 

1 

:\A- 

2 

55 
2 

1 

1 

1 

3 

1 

9 

1 

1 
3 

45 

1 

1 




















1 

• • • 

10 
2 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

• • • 

• a • 


... 
... 


3 




3 

1 


























... 


1 


... 




... 


• . . 


• •• 




... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 




... 


... 






... 




Garland: 

H-l 9 enipl oypf^p . p . • 










































6 




Grant: 

20-99 enployees... 


... 




... 






... 


... 




















"i 




1 


4 








Henpstead: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Hot Spring: 

0-19 employees..,. 
20-99 employees... 


• • « 

• • • 




3 


... 




1 


... 




A- 




• •• 






... 


• •• 








100-2'+9 enployees. 

Howard: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 en^jloyees... 


2 
1 

1 
2 










• • • 


• • • 

• • • 










1 




• • • 




1 
1 






1 










Independence: 

0-19 enployees.... 
20-99 einployees... 












9 

3 






• • • 
« • • 




... 


4 


1 
1 


1 
1 


c 










1 


























Izard: 

0-19 eiqiloyees .... 




























20-99 employees... 






























1 

1 
1 

1 
















Jackson: 

0-19 engjloyees .... 












































20-99 enployees . , . 
















































Jefferson: 

0-19 employees , . , . 
















































Johnson; 

n-1 9 Pinpl nypps . , , . 


1 


















1 




3 
























20-99 eii5)loyees... 




























Lafayette: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 




















27 


1 
1 


26 


















1 








20-99 employees ... 




























1 










Lawrence: 

0-19 enployees .... 


























1 


















Lee: 

0-19 enployees .... 






























1 


... 














20-99 eii5>loyees . , . 




















... 


"... 


1 
1 


















... 






Little River: 

0-1 9 pirrpT nypps . , . , 




















1 




1 




















20-99 employees... 




















1 
















Logan: 

0-19 enployees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Madison: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 

Marian: 

0-19 engjloyees.... 

Miller: 

0-19 enployees.... 
20-99 en^iloyees... 


1 
1 


















... 
... 

23 


1 


"1 

1 
21 


4 

• • • 

• • • 


1 
1 


1 

1 
1 




















• • • 

• • • 


1 




... 










... 




... 






... 






























1 
1 
















Mississippi: 

n-1 9 pmpl nyppR . , , . 
























































' 




' 


' 



































I 

i 

I 



'•See table 3, footnote 2. 



ARKANSAS 



3-13 



Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in wlilch no mineral operatliDns were reported are omitted) 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries ^ 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


1081 


109 


120 


120^ 


131 1 


132 


1381 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


U5 


145 
M 


147 


14Si 


149 


149 
M 


COUNTIES— Continued 

Mcmtgooieiy: 

0-19 enploy ees .... 

Nevada: 

0-19 employees.... 

Ouachita: 

0-19 enployees.,.. 
20-99 eii?)loyees... 

Pike: 

0-19 eii?)loyees . . . . 

Polk: 

0-19 einployees.... 
20-99 eii5)loyees... 

Pope: 

0-19 eii?)loyees.... 

Prairie: 

0-19 einployees.,.. 

Pulaski: 

0-19 eiiqjloyees .... 
20-99 enfiloyees... 
100-249 en^iloyees. 

Randolph: 

0-19 engjlcyees,,.. 

St. Francis: 

0-19 enjiloyees .... 

Saline: 

0-19 enjiloyees.... 
20-99 eii5)loyees... 
100-249 eii?)lQyees. 

Sebastian: 

0-19 eigjloyees .... 
20-99 einployees... 

Stone: 

0-19 Pinployees.... 

Union: 

0-19 enployees,... 
20-99 employees... 
100-249 enployees. 

Van Buren: 

0-19 enployees.... 

Washington: 

0-19 eii5)loyees.... 
20-99 eiqiloyees... 

White: 

0-19 einployees.... 
20-99 eii5)loyees... 

Undistributed: 

0-19 en^jloyees , . . . 
20-99 enjiloyees... 


2 

31 

89 
3 

2 

4 

1 

10 

2 

13 
4 
2 

1 

1 

8 
2 
2 

21 
3 

1 

143 
6 

1 

1 

2 

1 

2 

1 

58 

1 

L 


2 

31 

89 
3 

2 

4 
1 

9 

2 

12 
4 

1 

1 

1 

8 
2 
2 

20 
3 

142 
6 

1 

1 

2 

1 

2 

1 

58 

1 














1 


... 


... 


1 

9 
2 


3 

• • • 


17 

64 
3 


... 


14 
24 


... 


... 


1 


... 


... 


... 




... 


... 


... 














































1 




































































1 

1 

1 


• • • 


1 


























1 
















• • • 


• • • 


1 


1 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 












































1 












3 
1 


... 


2 
2 

1 


2 


... 


1 


... 


... 


1 










































1 










6 

4 


2 
1 


• • • 


... 


1 


• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


1 


1 














... 


... 


... 


... 














... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


1 


... 


1 
2 


1 














... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


















1 


... 


... 


... 
... 


• • • 

• * • 


4 
2 
2 


... 


... 


... 


2 

1 


... 


4 


1 


... 


... 


... 


... 


1 
1 


1 


... 


... 


... 


... 




















1 
1 
























1 


... 


... 


































89 
4 
1 

1 

1 


4 


49 
2 






• • • 


... 


1 


... 


... 


• • • 




! 














... 


... 


... 


... 










































































































1 
1 


... 














































































1 


















1 


■ > • 






























1 


* •• 
































17 
1 


• • • 


41 















































































































iSee table 3, footnote 2. 



i 



CALIFORNIA 



4-1 



4-2 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES— AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining by County.- i958 



CALIFORNIA 



SISKIYOU 


MODOC 


/ ® 

/ SHASTA 

V J 


LASSEN 


TEHAMA /n 


PLUMAS \ 


_L GLENN ( """'t 


VjEPP.© 
V-'^iEVADA 


/«w g?ri*T^ 


LAKE 1 1 ^ 





RANK AMONG STATES 
EMPLOYMENT • 7 
VALUE OF SHIPMENTS -3 



EMPLOYMENT 

8000- 12000 — 
4000- 7999 — 
2000- 3999 — 
1000- 1999 — 
500 - 999 — 
200 - 499 

25- 199 — 





^ MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

Q INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



MINING IN CALIFORNIA 

Employment For Industry Group By County: 1958 



4-3 



Metal Minint 




Oil and Gas Extraction 




General Extent ol Oil afxJ Gas Fields 



Coal Mining 




General Extent of Coal Frelds 



Nonmetallic Minerals Mining 



% MINERAL rNOUSTRfES 

O INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 





U. 5. DEPAtTMEKT Of COMMflKI 



100 ism 2.500 S,000 7.W0 

Numbtr of Cmplo/ees 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



4-4 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining 

Including Mining in Manufactures: 1902-1958 
CALIFORNIA 



50 



40 



I 
I 30 

o 



20 



10 



1902 1909 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION 
(Not available for 1929) 



NONMETALLIC MINERALS MINING 
METAL MINING 



1919 1929 

CENSUS YEAR 



INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES : 




1939 



1954 /958 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



CALIFORNIA 



4-5 



Table 1— General Statistics for Mineral Operations: 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of colunn captions see Introduction. For more detailed historical statistics for this vitate, see table 1 of the corresponding 
chapter of the 19W Census of Mineral Industries, Vol. II. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 



Kind of operation 
and year 



Establish- 
ments, 
number 



To- 
tal 



20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

a,000) 



Wayes 
($1,000) 



Value 
added 

In 
mining 



($1,000) 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machlD- 

ery 

in- 
stalled 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ^ 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



Energy used 

(In/h 
equivalent) 



Total 

(mil- 
lion) 



Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 



Mineral industries 
only: 

1958 

1954 



Including operations 
In manufactures: 
All operations: 

1958 

1954* 

1939' 

1919' 

1909' 

1902" 

Excluding oil and 
gas extraction 
industries: 

1958 

1954.* 

1939'' 

wag''* 

1919' 

1909' 

1902' ' 



1,658 
2,190 



1,758 
2,254 
%,049 

785 
2,025 
"2,048 



842 

1,286 

^797 

533 

369 

1,515 
^,743 



266 
3U 



230 
32A 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



122 
128 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



33 ,792 
39,366 



34,821 
40,104 
40,675 

22,255 
25,114 
16 ,290 



11,715 
12,583 
15 ,460 
10,465 

7,955 
16,998 
U,763 



211,773 
203,144 



216,995 
206,104 
76,94V 

37,644 
24,532 
14,686 



66 ,432 
58,615 
26,250 
17,166 

11,267 
15 ,496 
13,120 



23 ,474 
29,423 



24,496 
30,159 
33,561 

19 ,747 
22,605 
"14,539 



9,0^3 

9,894 

13 ,792 

9,224 

7,312 
15 ,663 
'^13,406 



48 ,097 
59,159 



50,122 
60,630 
68,546 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



19,959 

20,882 

32,279 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



130,038 
139,397 



13 5,218 
142,350 

57 .347 

32 .348 
21,153 
12»;77 



48 ,600 
44,302 
21,973 
13 ,891 

9,790 
13 ,580 
11,378 



1,225,488 
■1,315,181 



1,252,079 

^1,329 ,505 

318 ,401 

121,706 
32 ,768 
21,667 



197 ,921 

'158,855 

60,295 

27 ,938 

14,670 
21,350 
18,612 



160,665 
163,654 



*166,833 

^^166 ,838 

42,505 

39,755 

27 ,067 

6,501 



■^57,465 

'\5 ,629 

18 ,004 

9,977 

9,301 
9,579 
5,006 



107,510 
^28,970 



107,511 

^8,971 

(NA) 

876 

2,763 

(NA) 



1,069 

"5,010 

(NA) 

(NA) 

366 
2,759 

(NA) 



104,315 
141 ,060 



*104,319 

'141,067 

20,702 

1,433 
784 
702 



''5,160 

*7,736 

382 

731 

414 
384 
257 



44,557 
67,619 



'44,592 

'67,642 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



'9,849 

^13,513 

(NA) 

1,964 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1,480,235 
^/•9i,686 



162,300 
221,823 



1,512,998 

^,512,186 

381,608 

163 ,770 
63 ,382 
28,870 



251,548 

'208,567 

73,681 

38 ,646 

24,751 
34 ,072 
23 ,875 



*! 62,336 
^221,862 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



'19 ,916 
'22,201 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



■56,286 
38,425 



=^36,287 
'38,427 
29,002 

°20,044 
(NA) 
(NA) 



'5,030 

2,945 

934 

•°346 

(NA) 
(NA) 



l,5'^6 
1,306 



'^ 1,1+81 

1,274 

864 

1,015 
(NA) 
(NA) 



7IQ 
508 
2U 

101 

47 
(NA) 
(NA) 



NA Not available. 

'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of shipments (or production for 1919 and 
1909) and contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for preparation. The approximate magni- 
tude of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other years, represents net production 
and excludes this duplication. For years prior to 1958, excludes the value of residue gas from natural gas liquids plants. 
Excludes data for the Uranium- Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 
^Excludes the cost of natural gas processed at natiiral gas liquids plants, but includes the estimated value prior to processing of natiiral gas 
liquids contained in such gas. 

■'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is 
included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

'Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 
Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

Except, in part, for value of shipments and value added, excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction with quarries. 
The value added in dressing granite at such operations was $47 thousand; this value has been included in the value of shipments and value added in 
mining. The comparable value for limestone and slate is not available. 

Represents number of mines and quarries, number of natural gas liquids plants, and, for crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services 
industries , number of operating companies . 

Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations and for stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime establishments. The value of pro- 
ducts of such establishments in 1929 was about $9,669 million. See also footnote 14. 

Excludes purchased electricity. For"All operatlons"in 1939, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to only 2 percent of the total kwh 
equivalent of energy used; but for "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries" in 1929, to 20 percent. 

''Excludes data for sand, gravel, common clay, and shale mining operations. Includes data for 2 cement plants and for lime plants producing 
lime valued at $396 thousand. 

Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 
'Figures for minerals received for preparation for the Oil and Gas Extraction and Nonmetallio Minerals Mining Industries are included with those 
for supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

'■^Excludes data for common clay and shale mining operations. In 1939, there were 28 such mines, with products valued at $292 thousand, 
"includes data for nonproducing crude petroleum establishments, at whidh expenditures were about $500 thousand. See also footnote 11. 
Re"vised. 



4-6 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2A— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of oolumn captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Industry group and industry 



Total 



With 
20 or 
more 

em- 
plP^- 

ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 



(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies^ 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



19 5A^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



10 

1011 

102 

103 

10-4 

109 

1092 

13 

1311 



1321 

138 

1389 



Ull 



l^l 



l-Wl 



145 

1-452 

1459 



147 
1474 



149 



1495 
1496 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures.... 

Metal mining 

Iron ores 

r Copper, lead, zinc, gold, and 

J silver ores 

Miscellaneous metal ores 

Mercury ores 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas . 

Crude petroleum 

Natiiral gas 

Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services 

Oil and gas field services, 
nee 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures 

Dimension stone 

Mineral Industry 

Included in manufactures .... 

Crushed and broken stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures .... 
Crushed and broken limestone.. 

Mineral subindustry 

Crushed and broken granite 

(Mineral subindustry) 

Crushed and broken stone, nee. 
(Mineral subindustry) 

Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures .... 
Common sand and gravel 

(Mineral subindustry) 

Glass sand and molding sand... 

Clay and related minerals 

(Mineral industries only) 

Bentonite 

Clay and related minerals, nee 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures .... 

Chemical and fertilizer minerals 
Potash, soda, borate minerals. 

Miscellaneous minerals, nee 

(Mineral industries only) 

Pumice and pumlcite 

Talc, soapstone, pyrophyllite . 



1,758 

1,658 

100 

247 
3 



118 
56 

41 

916 
583 
565 
18 
67 
266 

151 

595 

495 

100 

31 

23 



97 
82 
15 
34 
19 

16 

47 

288 

250 

38 

239 
11 

40 
8 
48 
14 
34 

18 

7 



280 
266 

14 

13 

1 



6 
5 
5 

158- 
67 
63 
4 
33 
58 

22 

109 
95 
14 



34,821 
33,792 
^1,029 

1,778 
351 



561 
420 
383 

23,106 

16,535 

16,056 

479 

1,801 

4,770 

1,917 

9,937 

8,908 

^1,029 

119 

51 

68 

1,598 

1,066 

%32 

3792 

260 

251 

555 

4,053 

3,768 

'285 

3,645 
123 



263 
65 

165 
82 

^83 

2,714 
2,554 



1,032 

135 

99 



216,995 

211,773 

^5,222 

9,496 
1,993 



3,018 
2,016 
1,820 

150,513 
111,954 
108,931 
3,023 
11,113 
27,446 

10,044 

56,986 

51,764 

^5,222 

486 

186 

300 

8,935 

6,223 

^2,712 

^3,998 

1,286 

1,676 

3,261 

23,170 
21,599 
^1,571 

20,864 
735 



1,198 

316 

775 

388 

^387 

17,242 
16,407 



5,261 
391 
512 



24,496 
23,474 
^1,022 

1,393 
252 



433 
358 
329 

15,453 
9,858 
9,644 
214 
1,531 
4,064 

1,616 

7,650 

6,628 

^1,022 

107 

46 

61 

1,454 

922 

3532 

3754 

222 

216 

484 

3,223 

2,938 

^285 

2,837 

101 



235 
59 

156 
73 

'83 

1,692 
1,555 



785 

115 

79 



50,122 

48,097 

2,025 

2,896 
477 



946 
768 
711 

30,163 

19,310 

18,925 

385 

2,981 

7,872 

3,121 

17,063 

15,038 

2,025 

195 

91 

104 

3,526 
2,461 
1,065 
1,580 
515 

451 

1,495 

7,058 

6,487 

571 

6,271 
216 



468 
123 
307 
142 
165 

3,778 
3,403 



1,734 
133 
150 



135, 218 

130,038 

5,180 

6,535 
1,329 



1,761 
1,627 
1,491 

86,618 
55,517 
54,298 
1,219 
9,043 
22,058 

8,024 

42,065 

36,885 

5,180 

435 

177 

258 

7,898 
5,186 
2,712 
3,683 
971 

1,421 

2,794 

17,992 

16,421 

1,571 

15,828 
593 



1,036 
291 
721 
334 
387 

10,365 
9,684 



3,655 
292 
366 



1,252, 079 

1,225,488 

26, 591 

30,009 
15,934 



4,263 
3,973 
3,927 

1,054A58 
946, 540 
911,827 
34,713 
59,553 
48,065 

19,168 

167,912 

141,321 

26,591 

1,127 

604 

523 

29,577 
14, 794 
14,783 
17,306 
2,523 

4,396 

7,875 

69,686 

62,057 

7,629 

59,282 
2,775 



3,265 

871 

1,723 

836 

887 

42,844 
40,908 



17,694 
1,493 
1,153 



^423, 255 

417,047 

^6,208 

10,226 
3,294 



2,490 
1,457 
1,235 

349,712 
209,527 
202,773 
6,754 
113,582 
26,603 

7,467 

^63,317 

57,109 

^6,208 

424 

227 

197 

^9,149 

5,302 

=3,847 

24,818 

971 

1,172 

3,159 

=24,234 
22,875 
21,359 

21,660 
1,215 



1,734 

455 

=1,047 

621 

2426 

20,283 
19,576 



6,552 
365 
539 



^512,998 

l,48Ci235 

^32,763 

37,618 
18,217 



6,316 
5,154 
4,981 

1,261,450 

1,020,732 

983,048 

37,684 

171,087 

69,631 

25,603 

^213,930 

181,167 

^32,763 

1,462 

778 

684 

'37,626 

18,996 

318,630 

^21, 889 

3,259 

5,309 

10, 428 

'87,754 
78,766 
'8,988 

74,969 
3,797 



4,629 
1,259 

'2,636 
1,323 

'1,313 

55,418 
53,154 



22,459 
1,622 
1,588 



''162,336 

162,300 

*36 

2,617 

1,011 



437 
276 
181 

142,420 

135,335 

131,552 

3,783 

2,048 

5,037 

1,032 

^17,299 

17, 263 

''36 

89 

53 

36 

(NA) 

1,100 

(NA) 

(NA) 

235 

259 

606 

(NA) 

6,166 

(NA) 

5,973 
193 



370 

67 

(NA) 

134 
(NA) 

7,709 
7,330 



1,787 
236 
104 



40,104 

39,366 

'738 

'2,856 
(NA) 



1,180 

(NA) 

295 

27,521 
17,094 

[17,094 

2,101 
8,326 

(NA) 

9,727 

8,989 

'738 

65 

27 

38 

1,740 

■^1,240 

(NA) 

(NA) 

343 



253 

■^644 

(NA) 

3,812 

(NA) 

3,693 
119 



213 

(NA) 

247 

104 

'143 

2,540 
2,337 



(NA) 
118 
132 



'1,329,505 

'1,315, 181 

14,324 

* 31, 893 
(NA) 



6,369 

(NA) 

2,067 

1,170,650 
1,012,679 

1, 012, 679 

*84,655 
73,316 

(NA) 

126,962 

112,638 

14,324 

455 

134 

321 

25,342 

■^14,854 

(NA) 

(NA) 

4,109 

2,823 

'7,922 

(NA) 

54,175 

(NA) 

51,890 
2,285 



1,919 

(NA) 

2,744 

815 

1,929 

30,341 
24,301 



(NA) 

957 

1,133 



NA Not available . 

"^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufaotiirlng establishments. 

2For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased 
machinery Installed. 

'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations In manufacturing establishments, the number of production and 
development workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same 
figures are included for production and development workers and for all employees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts. Includes 
the estimated value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment at such operations. 

^Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 

^Includes data for Lignite Mining. The figure for value added excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 

''Excludes data for one crushed and broken marble establishment. 



CALIFORNIA 



4-7 



Tabic 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explonation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group and industry 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Total 



Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



Capital expenditures 
(*1,000) 



De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 



Net shipments of primary products' 



By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



10 

1011 

102 

103 

l&i 

109 

13 
1311 



1321 

138 

1389 



14 
1421 



1441 

147 
1474 

149 



All mineral industries 

Metal mining 

Iron ores 

>■ Copper, lead, zinc, gold, and 

' silver ores 

Miscellaneous metal ores 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 

Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services 

Oil and gas field services, 
nee 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Crushed and broken stone 

Crushed and broken granite... 
Crushed and broken stone, nee 

Sand and gravel 

Common sand and gravel 

Chemical and fertilizer miner- 
als 

Potash, soda, borate miner- 
als 

Miscellaneous minerals, nee... 



417,047 

10,226 
3,294 



2,490 
1,457 

349,712 
209,527 
202, 773 
6,754 
113,582 
26,603 

7,467 

57, 109 
5,302 
1,172 
3,159 

22,875 
21,660 



20,283 

19,576 
6,552 



160,665 

6,484 
1,107 



2,202 
'1,209 

109,368 

85,293 

83,233 

2,060 

4,842 

19,233 

5,815 

44,813 

4,219 

901 

2,683 

'17,607 
'16,534 



'16,984 

'16,458 
'5,389 



107,510 
207 

2 
(') 

106,442 
106,442 



861 
78 



36 

(') 
(') 



(') 

(') 
(') 



104,315 

1,083 
461 



179 
60 

99,159 

95,087 

91,430 

3,657 

1,239 

2,833 

673 

4,073 

385 

133 

67 

1,751 
1,743 



1,044 

1,013 
588 



44,557 

2,452 

1,726 



107 
188 

34,743 

29,147 

28,110 

1,037 

1,059 

4,537 

979 

7,362 
620 
138 
373 

3,517 
3,383 



2,255 

2,105 
575 



162,300 

2,617 
1,011 



437 
276 

142,420 

135,335 

131,552 

3,783 

2,048 

5,037 

1,032 

17,263 

1,100 

259 

606 

6,166 
5,973 



7,709 

7,330 
1,787 



84,174 

463 
(D) 



156 
39 

83,007 

82,988 

80,722 

2,266 

19 



704 

35 

9 



416 
416 



184 



78,126 

2,154 
(D) 



281 
237 

59,413 

52,347 

50, 830 

1,517 

2,048 

5,018 

1,032 

16,559 

1,065 

250 

606 

5,750 
5,557 



7,525 

7,298 
1,740 



XXX 

^1,803 



'133 



XXX 
XXX 

''306P92 
^72,570 
'28, 541 

XXX 
XXX 
XXX 

11, 723 
3,808 
6,375 

57, 800 
56,617 



^1,325 

XXX 



XXX 

'18,217 



XXX 
XXX 

XXX 

1,014,890 

883,816 

24,700 

'85,878 

XXX 

^°2 2,502 

XXX 

16,716 
5,232 
8,290 

^0,301 
^^76,529 



XXX 
XXX 



(NA) 

XXX 



(D) 

XXX 



XXX 
XXX 

''4,675 
^353,019 



XXX 

'^13,523 
158 
968 

^^8,994 
119,030 



(12) 
XXX 



XXX 
XXX 



XXX 
XXX 

XXX 

'159 

'12,954 

93,579 

XXX 

(10) 

XXX 

^20,728 

169 

1,380 



(12) 
(12) 



(D) 

XXX 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

NA Not available . 

^Represents gross shipnents of the mineral indicated by the industry naiie less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

^Represents direct-shipping iron ore plus iron concentrates for consumption. Quantity represents thousands of long tons. 

^Represents thousands of tons of crude ore mined, excluding placer gravels. 

'Figures for the cost of minerals received for preparation are combined with those for the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased 
fuels and electricity. 

'includes data for crude petroleum produced in Washington, amounting to less than 10 percent of the total shown for the Crude Petroleum and Natural 
Gas Industry. 

''Represents thousands of barrels of crude petroleum, field condensate, and drips shipped or used. For establishments classified in other indus- 
tries includes a small quantity of crude petroleum produced in Washington, amounting to less than one percent of the total shown. 

^Represents millions of cubic feet. 

'Represents net shipments of natural gas liquids. Quantity figures are in thousands of barrels. 
^°Figures for primary services performed in other industries are included with those for primary services performed in the specified industry. The com- 
bined figure shown includes receipts for services performed by establishments classified in Washington and Oregon. 
•"■^Includes minerals produced and used in the same manufacturing establishment. The value of such stone was estimated. 

■"■^Figures for shipments of primary products by establishments classified in other industries are combined with figures for shipments of primary pro- 
ducts by establishments classified in the specified industry. For sand and gravel, the figure shown represents gross value of shipments of primary 
products plus the estimated value of primary products produced and used in the same manufacturing establishment. 

^^See footnote 12. Includes shipments by other industries in the East and South amounting to less than one percent of the total shown. 



4-8 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 



(For explanation of line and colunin captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Total 



Mining only 



Total 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods ^ 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 
rately 
oper- 
ated 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 



Nonpro- 
duclng 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 



1011 



102 
103 
10^ 



109 



13 



U 



1421 



1441 



All industries: 

Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Metal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Iron ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 



} 



Copper, lead, zino, gold, and 
silver ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000.. 

Miscellaneous metal ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees . , 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Oil and gas extraction: 

Number of establishments 

Numher of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Nonmetallic minerals mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Crushed and broken stone: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. , 

Crushed and broken granite: 
Number of establishments..., 

Number of employees , 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. , 

Crushed and broken stone, nee: 
Number of establishments . . , 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 



Sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Common sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 



1,387 
28,963 

1,176,922 



244 
1,733 

29,571 



3 
351 

15,934 



118 
561 

4,263 



56 

420 

3,973 



650 
18,336 

1,006,093 



493 
8,894 

141,258 



82 
1,066 

14,794 



16 
251 

4,396 



47 
555 

7,875 



250 
3,768 

62,057 



239 
3,645 

59,282 



1,264 
28,773 

1,177,834 



155 
1,596 

29,609 



2 

(D) 



(D) 



56 

474 

4,261 



42 
405 

4,020 



625 

18,297 

1,006,931 



484 



141,294 



80 
(D) 

(D) 



16 

251 

4,396 



45 
(D) 

(D) 



249 
(D) 

(D) 



238 
(D) 

(D) 



778 
17,076 

956,499 



62 

(D) 

(D) 



146 



157 



558 
16,496 

947,378 



158 
(D) 

(D) 



16 
69 

1,385 



7 
58 

1,283 



(D) 
(D) 



51 
228 

3,256 



51 
228 

3,256 



928 



302 



150 



82 



626 



154 
410 

7,279 



317 



C) 



75 



121 
385 

6,462 



16 
69 

1,385 



7 
58 

1,283 



(D) 
(D) 



30 
159 

2,373 



30 
159 

2,373 



582 
16,574 

948,292 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



558 
16,496 

947,378 



22 

(D) 

(D) 



21 



883 



883 



411 
9,852 

161,355 



91 
1,495 

28,176 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



34 
439 

4,115 



36 
392 

3,863 



320 
8,357 

133,179 



64 
(D) 

(D) 



9 
193 

3,113 



37 
542 

7,778 



195 
3,516 

58,678 



184 
3,393 

55,903 



32 

913 

7,320 



27 

(D) 



(D) 



316 
6,549 

122,879 



61 
708 

21,536 



12 
173 



673 



10 
334 

2,916 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



22 
261 

3,442 



947 



(D) 
(D) 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



255 
5,841 

101,343 



62 
894 

12,752 



9 
193 

3,113 



37 
542 

7,778 



142 
2,885 

48,730 



133 
2,775 

46,205 



63 
2,390 

31,156 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



60 
(D) 

(D) 



53 
631 

9,943 



51 
618 

9,693 



75 
1,345 

59,980 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



67 

1,801 

59,553 



3 

(D) 

(D) 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



123 
190 

(?) 



39 
137 

(') 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



62 
37 



14 

15 



25 
39 



9 
14 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



CALIFORNIA 



4-9 



Table IC— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958— Continued 

(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establislunents 



Total 



Mining only 



Total 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods'- 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 


Nonpro 


rately 


ducing 


oper- 


estab- 


ated 


lish- 


prepa- 


ments 


ration 




plants 





147 



U74 



1-49 



Chemical and fertilizer minerals: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Potash, soda, borate minerals: 
Number of establishments. . . . 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Miscellaneous minerals, nee: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 



18 
2,7U 

-12, S--^ 



7 
2,554 

40,908 



80 
1,032 

17,694 



17 
(D) 

(D) 



7 
2,554 

40,908 



76 

1,027 

17,714 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



44 

112 

1,975 



626 



29 
72 

1,349 



12 
2,706 

42,830 



(D) 

(D) 



32 
915 

15,739 



6 
996 

22,108 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



31 
(D) 



(D) 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



4 
5 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

^Includes data for 18 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
^Includes data for 8 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 

^Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded value of shipments 
and capital expenditures. 



4-10 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of oolunm captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 
or more 
employ- 
ees 



All employees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



195A" 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added 

In 

($1,000) 



lU 



13 



131 



10 



13 

131 

132 
138 
10 



13 

131 

138 



13 

131 

132 
138 
10 

U 



CALIFORNIA: 

All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures. 

COUNTIES 

Alameda (mineral industries 

only) 

Sand and gravel 



Butte (mineral industries 
only) 

Oil and gas extraction.. 



Calaveras (mineral industries 
only) 



Colusa (mineral industries 

only) 

Crude petroleum and natural 
gas 



Contra Costa (mineral indus- 
tries only) : 
Including oil and gas 

extraction 

Excluding oil and gas 
extraction 



Del Norte. 



El Dorado (mineral industries 
only) 



Fresno (mineral industries 

only) , total 

Oil and gas extraction, 

total 

Crude petroleum and 

natural gas 

Natural gas liqtiids 

Oil and gas field services 

■ Metal mining and Nonmetalllc 
minerals mining (mineral 

industries only) 

Sand and gravel (mineral 
industries only) 



Glenn (mineral industries 

only) 

Oil and gas extraction, 
total 

Crude petroleum and 
natxiral gas 

Oil and gas field services 

Humboldt (mineral industries only) 

Imperial (mineral Industries 
only) 



Inyo. 



Kern , total 

Mineral Industries 

Included in manufactures.. 
Oil and gas extraction, 

total 

Crude petroleum and 

natural gas 

Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services 

• Metal mining and Nonmetalllc 
minerals mining (mineral 
industries only) 



1,758 

1,658 

100 



12 
3 

21 

15 
9 

11 

78 

67 

35 

5 

27 

11 
6 

26 

23 

11 
12 

11 

12 

36 

368 

363 

5 

323 

207 

16 

100 



280 
266 



3A,821 
33 ,792 
"^1 ,029 



-i89 
A18 



25 

52 

1 

169 

169 

K 

107 

1,253 

1,152 

621 
318 
213 

101 
58 

175 

173 

24 
149 

28 

35 
404 

7,6U 

7,509 

^^135 

6,604 

4,848 

499 

1,257 



216,995 

211,773 

'*5,222 



2,951 
2,555 



463 
155 



176 

298 
6 

1,162 

1,162 

14 

489 

7,627 

7,160 

3,927 
2,007 
1,226 

467 
328 

1,023 

1,009 

152 
857 

105 

U9 

2,365 

47 ,474 
46 ,850 



J.. 
•^624 

41,021 

30 ,726 
3,062 
7,233 



24,496 
23 ,474 
^^1,022 



435 
368 



(NA) 
(NA) 



36 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

144 

4 

90 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
280 
(NA) 

90 
51 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

25 

316 

(NA) 
(NA) 
'^135 

(NA) 

(NA) 
403 
(NA) 



50,122 

48,097 

2,025 



1,383 
769 



(NA) 
(NA) 



69 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

336 

8 

190 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

539 

(NA) 

186 
136 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

52 

620 

(NA) 
(NA) 
270 

(NA) 

(NA) 
776 
(NA) 



135 ,218 

130,038 

5,180 



2,584 
2,228 



(NA) 
(NA) 



150 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
951 

413 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
1,691 

(NA) 

4U 
287 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

128 

1,684 

(NA) 
(NA) 
624 

(NA) 

(NA) 

2,373 

(NA) 



1,252,079 

1,225,488 

26,591 



8,586 
7,895 



(NA) 
(NA) 



360 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

2,839 

62 

708 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
4,729 

(NA) 

1,591 
1,013 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

5,637 

(NA) 

(NA) 

2,553 

(NA) 

(NA) 

U,360 

(NA) 



V3,255 

417 ,047 

^6,208 



3,063 
2,676 



905 5,2 



795 1,723 4,760 23,179 



(NA) 
(NA) 



368 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

1,203 

37 

433 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
10,843 

(NA) 

579 
208 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

2,775 

(NA) 
(NA) 
3 808 

(NA) 

(NA) 
38,487 

(NA) 

6,628 



^,512,998 

lyi80,235 

'*32 ,763 



11,251 
10 ,201 



4,292 
3,366 



591 

1,686 
1,470 

3,882 

3,556 

79 

993 

114,932 
112,974 

95,248 

15 ,438 

2,288 

1,958 
1,061 

8,661 

8,588 

6,320 
2,268 

903 

976 

6,424 

*356,873 

353,512 

''3 ,361 

327,123 

257,390 
52 ,266 
17 ,467 

26,389 



^62,336 

162 ,300 

'36 



398 
370 



(NA) 
(NA) 



137 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

486 

20 

148 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
134 
(NA) 

212 
160 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

1,938 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
581 

(NA) 

3,418 



40,104 

39,366 

-^738 



427 
371 



^132 

46 

(NA) 
(NA) 

172 

(NA) 

38 

100 

■^912 

■^755 

621 
134 
(NA) 

157 
101 

^43 

(NA) 

17 
(NA) 

737 

75 

735 

■^6,558 
'6,558 

'5,895 

5,385 
510 
(NA) 

663 



^29,505 

^,315vl81 

H,324 



(NA) 
5,935 



(NA) 
(NA) 



233 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

2,207 

364 

994 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

4,817 

(NA) 

1,571 
1,035 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

^569 

956 

8,308 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

31,825 

(NA) 

^7,854 



See footnotes at end of table. 



Tabic 3— General St 



CALIFORNIA 
atistics by Selected IndustryGroups, for Counties: 

(For explanation of colunn captions see Introduction) 



4-11 



1958 and 1954-Continued 



Ind. 
code 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 

or more 

enploy- 

ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
e tc . and 
purchased 
machinery 
Installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



19 W 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 



JCiniTIES — Continued 

Kings 

Oil and gas extraction.. 
Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 



Lake. 



Los Angeles, total 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures . . 
Oil and gas extraction, 

total 

Crude petroleum and 

natural gas 

Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services 

Metal mining and Nonmetallic 
minerals mining (mineral 

industries only) 

Crushed and broken stone.. 
Sand and gravel: 

Including operations in 

manufactures 

Mineral industries only. 
Miscellaneous minerals , 
nee 



Madera. 



Marin (mineral industries 
only) 



Mariposa. 
Merced. . . 



Modoc. 



Mono. 



Monterey (mineral industries 
only) 



Napa 

Orange (mineral industries 

only) , total 

Oil and gas extraction, 
total 

Crude petroleum and 

natural gas 

Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services 

y Metal mining and Nonmetallic 
minerals mining (mineral 

industries only) 

Sand and gravel 

Placer (Including operations 
in manufactures ) 



Plumas . 



Riverside (mineral Industries 
only) 

Sand and gravel (mineral 
Industries only) 



Sacramento , total 

Oil and gas extraction. 
Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 



Metal mining and Nonmetallic 
minerals mining 



12 



4,50 

19 

352 

223 

2^ 
105 



46 
41 

7 

10 

7 
13 
8 
3 
7 

18 
13 

185 

158 

106 

7 

45 



328 
311 

179 

82 

10 ,960 

10,817 

''U3 

8,878 

5,802 

457 

2,619 



1,939 

lU 



*1,H8 
1,067 

200 

40 

125 

H 

42 

7 

33 

328 
78 

2,164 
1,909 

1,399 
167 
343 



255 
191 



30 
7 

487 

87 

386 
87 

73 
299 



1,926 
1,908 

1,132 

379 

69,935 

69,203 

•^732 

57,138 

39,140 

2,848 

15,150 



12 ,065 
758 



*6,659 
6,186 

771 

131 

632 
43 

2H 
23 
67 

1,897 
462 

13 ,189 

11,767 

8,812 

981 

1,974 



1,422 
1,104 



16 

2,648 

480 

2,112 
543 

462 
1,569 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

73 

(NA) 
(NA) 

■*ui 

(NA) 

(NA) 
399 
(NA) 



1,050 
97 



*852 
771 

Ul 
(NA) 

103 

14 

27 

7 

29 

(NA) 
69 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



207 
151 



27 
7 

382 

70 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
263 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

172 

(NA) 
(NA) 
268 

(NA) 

(NA) 
786 
(NA) 



2,256 
226 



1,791 
1,627 

328 

(NA) 

192 

18 

52 

9 

41 

(NA) 
159 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
291 
(NA) 



430 
314 



56 

7 

741 
144 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
648 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

335 

(NA) 
(NA) 
717 

(NA) 

(NA) 

2,372 

(NA) 



5,669 
678 



4,846 
4,373 

UO 

(NA) 

497 
42 

145 
23 
65 

(NA) 
396 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
8^2 
(NA) 



1,125 
856 



130 

16 

1,994 

386 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
1,351 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

614 

(NA) 

(NA) 

4,217 

(NA) 

(NA) 

16,943 

(NA) 



21,059 
1,560 



24,597 

17 ,993 

1,055 

(NA) 

1,490 

148 

380 

86 

131 

(NA) 
1,199 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

6,017 

(NA) 



4,988 
4,152 



482 

41 

19 ,002 

1,533 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
3,369 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

315 

(NA) 
(NA) 
^728 

(NA) 

(NA) 

20,498 

(NA) 



V,431 
462 



^6,588 
5,998 

720 

(NA) 

751 
115 
161 
24 
123 

(NA) 
541 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

8,457 

(NA) 



1,326 
1,125 



59 
16 

3,948 

(D) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
1,970 



H,474 
U,223 

8,925 

903 

*307,489 

302 ,54V 

*4,942 

275 ,932 

216,126 
36,787 
23 ,019 



26,615 
1,913 



*29,74.0 
22,546 

1,552 

1,111 

2,182 
185 
534 
110 
177 

34,896 
1,685 

88 ,223 

82,311 

63 ,687 

U,317 

4,307 



5,912 
5,000 



531 
53 

21,524 

1,895 

16,165 
11,051 

10 ,728 
5,114 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

26 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
654 
(NA) 



1,875 
109 



'1.4^5 
1,U5 

223 

(NA) 



59 

78 

7 

77 

(NA) 
55 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

157 

(NA) 



402 
277 



10 
4 

1,426 

(D) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
225 



'507 
(NA) 

500 

66 

''7,998 
■^',874 
^^124 

'6,707 

6,H8 

559 

(NA) 



1,167 
(NA) 



(NA) 
891 

(NA) 

^70 



29 

46 

16 

188 

■^271 

115 

'2,188 

'1,990 

1,763 
227 
(NA) 



198 
155 



'20 
(NA) 

557 
92 

^86 
86 

470 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

727 

(NA) 

(NA) 

2,278 

(NA) 

(NA) 

27,785 

(NA) 



"20,094 
(NA) 



(NA) 
16 ,838 

(NA) 

^1,111 

1,280 

^14.1 

534 

143 

1,977 

(NA) 
1,133 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

12,353 

(NA) 



3,15 V 
2,804 



'219 

(NA) 

^13,841 

1,011 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
6,823 



See footnotes at end of table. 



4-12 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 3.-General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954-Continued 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 

or more 

enploy- 

ees 



All employees 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
purchased 
machinery 
Installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



1954^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 



13 
10 



U 

14. 
131 



13 
131 

10 



lAZ 



131 

138 

10 

132 



LM, 



COUNTIES— Continued 

San Benito (mineral industries 

only) 

Oil and gas extraction 

• Metal mining and Nonmetallic 
minerals mining 



San Bernardino, total 

Mineral industries : 
Including oil and gas 

extraction 

Excluding oil and gas 

extraction 

Included in manufactures . . 

Nonmetallic minerals mining: 

Including operations In 

manufaotiires 

Mineral industries only. 
Crushed and broken stone 
(including operations in 

manufactures ) 

Sand and gravel: 

Including operations in 

manufactures 

Mineral industries only. 

San Diego (mineral industries 

only) 

Sand and gravel 



San Francisco (mineral indus- 
rles only) 



San Joaquin (mineral indus- 
tries only) 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas .^. 

Sand and gravel (including 
operations in manufactures) 



San Luis Obispo (mineral 
industries only) , total. 
Oil and gas extraction. 
Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 



• Metal mining and Nonmetallic 
minerals mining (mineral 
industries only) 

San Mateo (mineral industries 
only) 

Crushed and broken stone 

Santa Barbara (mineral indus- 
tries only) , total 

Crude petroleum and natural 
gas 

Oil and gas field services . . 



} 



Metal mining, Natural gas 
liquids , and Nonmetallic 
minerals mining (mineral 
industries only) 



Santa Clara (mineral indus- 
tries only) 

Crushed and broken stone 
(including operations in 

manufactures ) 

Sand and gravel (mineral 
industries only) 



Santa Cruz (mineral indus- 
tries only) 



Shasta (mineral industries 
only) 



15 



13 



305 
30 

275 
1,887 

1,706 

1,658 
''iSl 



'1,790 
1,609 



''19U 



n86 
127 



582 
4.96 



350 

85 

7 

67 



166 
117 



1,607 
176 



1,431 
10,986 

10,027 

9,617 
^959 



53 



49 



1,427 

576 

109 



742 

121 

^58 
66 

85 

109 



10,328 
9,369 



^^1,086 
762 



3,401 
2,951 



6,239 

459 

44 

340 



950 
713 

335 



237 



639 
601 



8,649 

3,639 
627 



4,383 

651 

^^368 
352 

535 
468 



(NA) 
(NA) 

238 
(NA) 

(NA) 

1,123 
''iSO 



*1,269 
1,087 



nsi 



*142 
83 



(NA) 
396 



19 

(NA) 

(NA) 

61 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



43 



(NA) 
58 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



573 

101 

452 
58 

61 



(NA) 
(NA) 



472 
(NA) 

(NA) 

2,504 
361 



2,797 
2,436 



364 



284 
165 



(NA) 
837 



41 

(NA) 

(NA) 

130 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



82 



(NA) 
130 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



1,307 
255 

lU 

155 

139 
194 



(NA) 
(NA) 

1,193 
(NA) 

(NA) 

6,688 
956 



7,481 
6,525 



897 



815 
491 



(NA) 
2,342 



92 

(NA) 
(NA) 
292 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



191 



(NA) 
452 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



3,232 
507 

312 

301 

335 
352 



(NA) 
(NA) 

3,865 
(NA) 

(NA) 

22 ,211 
6,447 



28,801 
22,334 



6,357 



2,976 
1,915 



(NA) 
6,997 



306 

(NA) 

(NA) 

1,606 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



1,373 

(NA) 
1,133 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



16 ,456 

2,399 

3,321 
1,402 

988 

1,254 



(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 



(NA) 

15,137 
(D) 



(D) 
H,694 



'1,240 



^541 
359 



(NA) 
3,191 



83 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(D) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



307 



(NA) 
398 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



13 ,667 

552 

^894 
270 

461 

283 



6,955 
2,498 

4,457 
■^42 ,749 

35,336 

34,440 
''7,413 



Hi ,621 
34,208 



^7,541 



^^3 ,432 
2,189 



10,836 
9,128 



351 

3,667 
1,5-10 
1,921 



9,919 
8,272 

5,960 



1,647 



1,692 
1,5U 



101,921 

71,945 
1,171 



28,805 

2,661 

*4,083 
1,564 

1,381 

1,216 



(NA) 
(NA) 

216 
(NA) 

(NA) 

2,908 
(D) 



(D) 
2,820 



=56 

=85 
85 



(NA) 
1,060 



38 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(D) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



33 



(NA) 
17 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



1,318 

290 

'132 
108 

68 

321 



251 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

'°2,355 

2,355 
(NA) 



(NA) 
2,240 



'137 



(NA) 
276 



462 
389 



^U8 

'117 

(NA) 

^96 

■^203 
-(NA) 

82 
(NA) 



65 

(NA) 



'1,338 

590 

(NA) 



748 

■^67 

(NA) 
(NA) 

78 

156 



* '°2,062 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

* '°24,478 

*24,478 
(NA) 



(NA) 
23,638 



'1,580 



(NA) 
2,965 



4,137 
3,464 



(NA) 

"1,699 

(NA) 

'1,638 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



(NA) 



1,017 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



11,834 

^989 

(NA) 
(NA) 

*803 

1,371 



See footnotes at end of table. 



CALIFORNIA 



4-13 



Tabic 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954— Continued 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 
or more 
employ- 
ees 



All employees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added In 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
Bupplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
Inntnllod 

($1,000) 



Value of 
Ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



195A' 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added 

In 

mining 

($1,000) 



131 



lU 



COUNTIES— Continued 

Siskiyou (mineral inudstries 
only ) 

Solano 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 



Sonoma(mineral industries only) 
Sand and gravel (mineral 
industries only) 

Stanislaus (mineral industries 
only) 



Tehama, , 
Trinity. 



131 



131 

138 
132 
U 



13 

131 



13 
131 

133 

13 
131 

138 



Tulare (mineral industries 

only) 

Crude petroleum and natural 
gas 

Ventura (mineral industries 

only) 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Oil and gas field services.. 



Natural gas liquids and 
Nonmetalllc minerals mining 



Yolo, total 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and 

natural gas 

Nonmetalllc minerals mining 
(sand and gravel) 



Offshore, total 

Crude petroleum and natural 
gas 

Oil and gas field services.. 



Undistributed , total 

Crude petroleum and natural 
gas 

Oil and gas field services.. 



20 
17 

5 
22 

5 

16 

U 

9 

16 
6 

132 

61 
59 

12 

15 
12 

8 

3 

20 

8 

12 

120 

63 
57 



51 
110 

50 
233 
126 

61 
26 
35 

135 

U 

2,991 

1,/V98 
1,137 

356 

337 
2A5 

245 

92 

6A8 

454 
194 

798 

215 
583 



208 
629 
316 
1,217 
656 

294 
109 
109 

588 
25 



18,174 

9,479 
6,542 

2,153 

2,255 
1,549 

1,549 

706 

3,987 

2,871 
1,116 

5,507 

1,828 
3,679 



49 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

113 

28 

(NA) 

31 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

258 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

55 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



106 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
393 

51 

(NA) 

66 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

527 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

116 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



194 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

558 

139 

(NA) 

94 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

1,460 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

334 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



665 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
1,432 

(NA) 

(NA) 

111 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

14,229 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

2,428 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



448 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

368 

(NA) 

(NA) 

152 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

24,663 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

590 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



915 
9,812 
8,685 
3,327 
1,652 

717 
929 
241 

2,699 
1,379 

202,251 

149,749 
14,340 

38,162 

11,905 
9,490 

9,435 

2,415 

63,331 

59,803 
3,528 

19,306 

12 ,345 
6,961 



198 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

148 

(NA) 

(NA) 

22 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

730 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

603 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



73 

'89 

(NA) 

■^107 

95 

'66 

'30 

39 

60 
(NA) 

'2,392 

1,982 
(NA) 

410 

'72 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

273 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



821 

'°621 

(NA) 

^2 ,303 

1,303 

^622 

^170 

287 

577 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

18,801 

^796 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

NA Not available. 
Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Companies operating oil and gas field properties were permitted to maie only one report for all oil and gas field operations in each State. Com- 
panies engaged only in performing oil and gas field or other mining services were permitted to make only one report for all States; these reports were 
classified on the basis of the principal State in i.Aiich the service were performed. For 1958, such reports contained employment on March 15 and 
selected other data by State and coxrnty. For such operations, the State total figures shown for number of establishments represent the number of 
reports received which were classified in the State and those shown for number of establishments in a county represent the number of reports that 
indicated any operations in the specified county. All county statistics for such operations which were not reported separately were obtained by 
allocating the totals reported for each company on the basis of the reported county data. 

'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of pur- 
chased machinery. 

•*See table 2A, footnote 3. 

'Excludes figures for crxished and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 
Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 

'Excludes data for the Oil and Gas Field Services Industries. 

^Excludes data for one establishment in the Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Industry. See also footnote 7. 

'Represents mineral industries only. 
'^Excludes data for 2 Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas operations. See also footnote 7. 



4-14 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4.— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Gold and silver ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 Metal mining services 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 
120 Bituminous coal and lignite 



12C Coal mining services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

141 Dimension stone 

141M Dimension stone in manufactures 

142 Crushed and broken stome 

142M Crushed and broken stone In manufactures 
144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel in manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonmetallic minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c, in 

manufactures 



(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied In 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 



In- 
cluded 

to 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



104 



105 



106 



108^ 



109 



120 



12C- 



138- 



142 



144 



145 



147 



148^ 



149 



149 
M 



California, total. 

No employees 

1-4 employees... 
5-9 employees... 



10-19 employees.. 
20-49 employees.. 
50-99 employees.. 
100-249 employees 

250-499 employees 
500-999 employees 
1,000 employees 
and over 



COUNTIES 

Alameda: 

0-19 employees... 
20-99 employees . . 
100-249 employees 

Alpine: 

0-19 employees... 

Amador: 

0-19 employees 

Butte: 

0-19 employees... 

Calaveras: 

0-19 employees . . . 
20-99 employees.. 
100-249 employees 

Colusa: 

0-19 employees... 
20-99 employees.. 

Contra Costa: 

0-19 employees... 
20-99 employees.. 

Del Norte: 

0-19 employees... 

El Dorado: 

0-19 employees ... 
20-99 employees . . 

Fresno: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees.. 
100-249 employees 

Glenn: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . 

Humboldt: 

0-19 employees 

Imperial: 

0-19 employees... 

Inyo: 

0-19 employees... 
20-99 employees.. 
100-249 employees 

Kern: 

0-19 employees... 
20-99 employees.. 
100-249 employees 
250 employees and 
over 



1,758 
259 
759 
240 

220 
179 
r54 
^30 

9 
3 



1,658 
252 
711 
223 

206 
169 

^29 

9 
3 



11 


9 


2 


2 


65 


61 


15 


15 


2 


2 


24 


23 


3 


3 


12 


11 


15 


12 


34 


34 


1 


1 


1 


1 


)07 


304 


49 


47 


6 


6 


6 


6 



100 

7 

48 

17 

14 

10 

3 

1 



583 
75 

329 
74 

38 

36 

9 

10 

6 
2 



179 

18 

5 



15 



250 
19 
70 
56 

44 

48 

9 

4 



1 .. 



^See table 3, footnote 2. 



rRevised. 



CALIFORNIA 



4-15 



Tabic 4.-Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 19 58— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 


In- 
cluded 

tn 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


uc" 


1311 


132 


138^ 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148" 


149 


149 
M 


COUNTIES— Continued 

Kings: 

0-19 employees 


30 
2 

8 

1 

2 

355 
72 
18 

5 
10 

5 

3 

13 

8 

3 

7 

15 
5 

11 
2 

16 

160 
24 

1 

1 

10 

6 

27 
3 

1 

26 
4 
1 

25 

1 
1 

73 

7 

2 

29 
9 

1 


30 
2 

8 

1 

2 

338 
70 
18 

5 

10 

4 
3 

13 

8 

3 

7 

13 

5 

11 
2 

16 

159 
24 

1 

1 

9 

6 

24 
2 

1 

26 
4 

1 

23 
1 

1 

61 

4 

2 

26 
9 

1 




1 














2 






11 

1 


"l 


13 










2 












1 




20-99 employees 


































Lake: 

0-19 employees.... 


















2 
1 












3 














1 




20-99 employees. .. 
































Lassen: 

0-19 employees 












































2 

4 
3 




Los Angeles: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees... 


17 
2 






1 


3 




1 




4 


191 
18 
10 

4 
4 


16 
8 


78 

19 

7 

1 
1 


7 




8 
2 




20 
20 

1 


4 
1 




12 
1 




1 




100-249 employees. 




















250 employees and 
over 










































Madera: 

0-19 employees . 














1 


... 


2 










2 

1 

2 
6 

1 












2 




Marin: 

0-19 employees .... 


1 








1 














... 


... 








20-99 employees. .. 












... 






Mariposa: 

0-19 employees.... 

Merced: 

0-19 employees 

Modoc: 

0-19 employees .... 










8 




1 


... 


1 


... 




1 


2 






















































2 

4 




Mono: 

0-19 employees 

Monterey: 


2 








2 




1 
1 




... 




























2 
2 




7 


1 








2 
2 

2 

4 

15 
4 


1 












20-99 employees 
























Napa: 

0-19 employees . 














1 




















20-99 employees 
























1 


... 


... 


1 










Nevada: 

0-19 employees 

Orange: 

0-19 employees .... 


1 








12 
2 






























95 
9 

1 

1 


2 

5 


40 
5 


... 




1 
1 


... 





3 












20-99 employees 












100-249 employees. 

250 employees and 

over 
















































































Placer: 

0-19 employees.... 

Plumas : 

0-19 employees .... 

Riverside: 


1 

3 

1 








3 
3 




1 

1 
9 


... 


... 








1 


1 

1 
1 


... 


1 

1 

4 
2 


... 


3 


... 




















1 






2 




1 


3 












20-99 employees . . . 
250 employees and 














1 










































Sacramento: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 

San Benito: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 

San Bernardino: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees... 
250 employees and 






3 










9 

1 














6 
3 






































2 


... 






1 










































6 


6 








... 


1 
1 








2 












































1 
2 




























12 
3 


1 


2 




3 




7 




3 









1 


10 

1 


2 
2 


10 
2 


8 

1 


4 


... 


1 

1 

2 




11 

































San Diego: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 


3 






2 


1 










... 






5 


1 


3 


... 


13 
8 

1 














































































' 































^See table 3, footnote 2. 



4-16 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4 —Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by Industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


12Cl 


1311 


132 


138^ 


141 


141 

M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148^ 


149 


149 

M 


COUNTIES— Continued 

San Francisco: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees.. . 

San Joaquin: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees . . . 

San Luis Obispo; 
0-19 employees.. .. 
20-99 employees.. . 

San Mateo: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 

Santa Barbara: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 
250 employees and 


5 

1 

14 
1 

36 
3 

13 

1 

70 
6 

1 

T_ 

30 

1 

10 
2 

12 
1 

7 
2 

20 

1 

14 
3 

19 
3 

1 

16 
1 

3 

14 

8 

1 

15 
2 

2 
3 

100 

27 

6 

2 

12 
2 

1 


4 

12 
1 

34 
3 

12 
1 

67 
6 
1 

1 

25 

1 

9 
1 

11 

1 

7 
2 

19 
1 

14 
3 

18 
3 

1 

15 
1 

3 

14 

8 

1 

14 
2 

2 

2 

98 
26 

6 

2 

12 
2 

1 


1 

1 

2 
































1 


1 


1 




1 


1 






1 






































2 










4 




4 








2 

1 

2 






1 




























2 












7 


2 


1 
1 

1 


11 
1 

4 


1 


11 















1 






















1 
















2 






3 
1 

1 




1 


... 




1 


























3 

















1 


30 
2 

1 


4 
2 


24 

1 






2 












3 
1 










































































































1 




Santa Clara; 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 

Santa Cruz: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees. . . 

Shasta; 

0-19 employees . 

20-99 employees.. . 

Sierra: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Siskiyou: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 

Solano; 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 

Sonoma: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees... 
100-249 employees 

Stanislaus: 

0-19 employees . 

20-99 employees... 

Sutter: 

0-19 employees.... 

Tehama; 

0-19 employees . 

Trinity; 

0-rl9 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 

Tulare; 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees. . . 

Tuolumne; 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees 

Ventura: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 
250 employees and 


5 

1 
1 

1 








1 






1 


8 












4 




10 
1 

5 
1 

2 






3 






























2 




... 




1 






























5 






1 






























































7 
2 

5 

1 










































































8 


1 


































































3 
2 

1 




8 






1 




2 

3 
2 


































■; 


1 
4 
























2 




3 










3 

1 


































1 
1 


































1 












4 










8 

1 






... 






































1 
1 




1 
7 






1 






























3 

1 


... 


1 
1 


3 

1 
























^ 








1 


















































1 








6 




2 










3 
1 


... 


... 


1 


1 

1 


























1 

2 
1 








1 




1 
































2 




































52 

5 
2 

2 

6 

1 
1 


3 

4 


41 

15 

3 






1 
1 
1 


2 

1 


































1 


















































































Yolo; 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 






















4 










2 

1 
























































1 












































1 — 






... 






. . . 




' 





























^See table 3, footnote 2. 



CALIFORNIA 



4-17 



Tabic 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 19 58— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


L2Cl 


ml 


132 


1381 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


14«i 


149 


149 

M 


COUNTIES— Cont inued 

Yuba: 

0-19 employees .... 


5 
1 

13 
6 

1 

109 
10 

1 


5 
1 

13 
6 

1 

109 
10 

1 
















1 




... 


... 






1 










2 




1 












20-99 employees 


— 








1 
















Offshore: 

0-19 employees .... 










61 




7 
5 


























20-99 employees . . . 












































250 employees and 
over 












































Undistributed: 

0-19 employees 




















... 


48 
8 

1 


























20-99 employees . . . 












































100-249 employees. 

























































































^See table 3, footnote 2. 



COLORADO 

5-1 



5-2 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES — AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining by County.- 1958 



COLORADO 



RANK AMONG STATES 
EMPLOYMENT - 16 
VALUE OF SHIPMENTS -14 



^ MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

Q INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 



EMPLOYMENT 
8000 - 12000 — 
4000- 7999 — 
2000- 3999 
1000- 1999 
500 - 999 
200 - 499 

25 - 199 





WASHINGTON 



© 



© 



J © 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COAAMERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



MINING IN COLORADO 

Employment For Industry Group By County: 1958 



5-^ 



Metal Mining 




Oil and Gas Extraction 




: -:,i OIL SHALE 



Genefal Extent of Oil and Gas FwkJs 



Coal Mining 




General Extent of Coal Fields 



Nonmetallic Minerals Mining 




9 MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

O INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 




u. s. ocPAirrMe^r of commbkx 



100 1000 2W0 5000 'WO lOOOO 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



5-4 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining 

Including Mining in Manufactures: 1902- 1958 
COLORADO 



30 



I 20 



10 



1902 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



1909 



OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION 
(Not available for 1929) 



NONMETALLIC MINERALS MINING 
COAL MINING 
METAL MINING 



\ 




1919 1929 

CENSUS YEAR 



1939 



195^ 1958 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



COLORADO 



"j-S 



Tabic 1— General Statistics for Mineral Operations; 19 58 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of ooluim captions see Introduction. For more detailed hlatorioal Btatlatioa for this atate, see table 1 of the corresponding 
chapter of the 1954 Census of Mineral Industries, Vol. II. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operntiono) 





Establish- 


1 
All enployees 


Production 


and 


Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 


Selected expenses ($1,000) 


Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ^ 

($1,000) 


Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 

($1,000) 


Biiergy used 

(kwh 
equivalent) 




number 


development workers 


Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sals, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 


Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 


Con- 
tract 
work 


Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
Iji- 
stalled 


Kind of oporatlon 
and y«ar 


To- 
tal 


20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploj^ 
ees 


Number 


Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 


Number 


Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 


Wayes 
($1,000) 


Total 

(mil- 
lion) 


Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 


Mineral Industries 
only: 
1958 


967 
1,020 

992 

1,043 

*589 

431 

537 
1,060 
%,998 


129 
117 

132 

118 

(^^A) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


14,109 
13,550 

14,273 
13,690 
14,800 
16,061 

18,699 
24,227 
25,210 


76,236 
59,544 

76,923 
59,999 
19,823 
25,528 

28,999 
22,082 
24,316 


9,854 
10,840 

10,014 
10,977 
13,469 
15,099 

17,268 

22,612 

"22,856 


19,015 
21,045 

19,340 

21,317 

23,356 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


47,493 
43,934 

48,166 
44,381 
16,845 
23,075 

26,042 
19,663 
21,215 


249,446 
'204,547 

255,896 

'207,541 

41,875 

32,205 

35,632 
29,579 
31,588 


67,383 
49,949 

*67,986 

"50,243 

9,815 

8,712 

10, 879 
6,997 
8,038 


37,038 
'3,355 

37,038 

33,355 

(NA) 

(NA) 

4,282 

5,959 

(NA) 


36,338 
40,750 

■'36,338 

*40,761 

601 

613 

424 

3,145 

977 


31,374 
24,767 

'31,390 

'24,787 

(NA) 

1,847 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


362,473 
'258,895 

369,520 

'262,214 

52,291 

41,530 

51,217 
45,680 
40,603 


59,106 
56,479 

'59,128 

'56,479 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


%i30 
4,872 

%^32 

'4,873 

2,113 

2,329 

^^3,205 
(NA) 
(NA) 


■-63. 
449 


1954 


Including operations 
In manufactures: 
1958 


^622 


1954* 


444 


1939' 


157 


1929' 


154 


1919^° 


186 


1909^° 


(NA) 


1902^^ 


(NA) 





NA Not available. 
For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment. For 1958, 1954, 1919, 1909, represents gross value of shipments (or production for 1919 and 
1909) and contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for preparation. The approximate magni- 
tude of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other years, represents production and 
excludes this duplication. For years prior to 1938, excludes the value of residue gas from natural gas liquids plants. 

'Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. No data on value of shipments or cost of minerals received for preparation were 
obtained for this industry. 

■'Excludes the cost of natural gas received for processing, but includes the estimated value prior to processing of natural gas liquids contained in 
such gas. See also footnote 2. 

*For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, and for dimension stone mining 
operations in manufactures in 1958, the cost of contract work is included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels, etc. 
'Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 
^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

''Excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants, if any, operated in conjunction with 5 dimension stone quarries. 

^Represents number of mines and quarries, number of natural gasoline plants, and, for crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services indus- 
tries, number of operating companies. 

'Excludes data for the oil and gas extraction industries and for common clay and shale mining operations. In 1939, the value of products and serv- 
ices of such operations was $1,607 thousand. 

^"Excludes data for sand, gravel, common clay, and shale mining operations. In 1939, the value of products of such operations was $576 thousand. 
^ ^Excludes purchased electricity. For 1929, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to only 4 percent of the total kwh equivalent of energy 
used. 

•"■'includes data for one cement plant and for lime plants producing lime valued at $46 thousand. See also footnote 10. 
^'Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 
Revised. 



5-6 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



1958 and 1954 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group and industry 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Total 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



195*^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 
added in 



($1,000) 



10 



104 
1042 



108 
1082 



109 
1094 



1211 



13 

1311 



138 

1381 

1389 



14 



1421 



1441 



145 
147 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manuf actures . • • . 

Metal mining 

Gold and silver ores 

Lode gold 

Metal mining services 

Metal mining services, nee... 

Miscellaneous metal ores: 

Uranlum-radlum-vanadium ores.. 

Bituminous coal mining (Bituminous 
coal) 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas. 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 

Oil and gas field services: 
Drilling oil and gas wells.... 
Oil and gas field services, 
nee 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures .... 
Dimension stone 

Crushed and broken stone: 

Mineral industry 

Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures 

Clay and related minerals 

Mineral industries 

Chemical and fertilizer minerals 



992 

967 

25 

382 

59 
41 

24 
15 



227 



105 

341 

222 

200 

22 

56 

39 

164 

139 

25 

17 



12 



132 

129 

3 

37 

3 
3 

4 
4 



14,273 

14, 109 

^164 

5,763 

229 
197 

317 
280 



2,500 



2,016 

5,252 

3,665 

3,470 

195 



1,009 

350 

1,242 

1,078 

^164 

61 

216 

520 
457 
363 

112 
91 

230 



76,923 

76,236 

^687 

28,821 

922 

724 

1,728 
1,576 



12,688 



9,628 

32,482 

24,344 

23,163 

1,181 

5,376 
1,565 

5,992 

5,305 

^687 

216 



1,098 

2,559 

2.302 

*257 

453 
376 

1,213 



10,014 

9,854 

^160 

4,680 

203 
176 

302 
265 



1,990 



1,800 

2,465 

1,141 

1,024 

117 



829 

304 

1,069 

909 

3l60 

51 

192 

421 
358 
^63 

100 
79 

207 



19,340 

19,015 

325 

9,185 

424 
370 

656 
585 



4,181 

2,807 

5,018 

2,267 

1,995 

272 

1,709 

661 

2,330 

2,005 

325 

120 

385 

924 

798 
126 

195 
155 

510 



48,166 

47,493 

673 

22,104 

820 
650 

1,623 
1,471 



9,805 



8,359 

12,655 

6,290 

5,690 

600 



4,019 

1,349 

5,048 

4,375 

673 

177 

948 

2,047 

1,790 

257 

390 
313 

1,055 



255,896 

249,446 

6,450 

70,130 

1,867 
1,417 

2,773 
2,470 



29,176 



16,348 

151,420 

132,435 

127,094 

5,341 

9,740 

3,199 

17,998 

11,548 

6,450 

389 



2,002 

7,982 
5,639 
2,343 

1,427 
830 

2,358 



2 172, 752 

172,133 

^619 

92,752 

1,869 
1,714 

1,268 
1,154 



75,830 

4,698 

69,671 

55,880 

48,202 

7,678 

6,854 
1,159 



^5,631 

5.0X2 

*619 

213 



1,008 

2,270 

2.069 

*201 



442 
380 

1,308 



^369,520 
362,473 

37, 047 

141, 830 

3,102 
2,889 

3,967 
3,580 



87, 773 

19,698 

185,346 

155,256 

149,004 

6,252 

15,309 

4,016 

^22,646 

15, 599 

^7,047 

537 

2,845 

9,884 

7,340 

'2,544 

1,720 
1,061 

3,481 



'59,128 

59,106 

*22 

21,052 

634 
242 

74 
44 



17,283 



1,348 

35,745 

33,059 

26,292 

6,767 

1,285 

342 

*983 

961 

*22 

65 

165 

(HA) 

368 

(NA) 

(NA) 
149 

185 



13,690 

13,550 

^140 

'6,178 

'337 
*318 

(NA) 
(NA) 



1,631 



2,618 

4,754 
2,340 

•2,340 



1,604 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(«) 

^140 

79 

'113 

(NA) 
482 
(NA) 

197 
132 

1O219 



'207,541 

'204,547 

2,994 

"65,599 

'1,892 
*1,823 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 



13,480 

125,468 
107,149 

107,149 



11,465 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(*) 

2,994 

343 

'2,849 

(NA) 

5,028 

(NA) 

1,774 
1,020 

'■°2,336 



NA Not available. 

■"■Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased 
machinery installed. 

■'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the number of production and 
development workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same 
figures are included for production and development workers and for all employees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes 
the estimated value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment. 

^Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadlum Ores Industry. 

*Data for the Nonmetallic Minerals Mining Industries are included with those for the Metal Mining Industries. 

'includes data for the Copper Ores Industry. 

^Includes data for the Placer Gold Industry. 

'includes data for mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

■"■^Represents da^ta for -the Fluorspar Industry only. 



COLORADO 



5-7 



Table 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries; 1958 



(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group and industry 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Total 



Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



Capital expenditures 
(*1,000) 



Total 



De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment' 



Net shipments of primary products^ 



By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



10 
109A 



1211 



13 
1311 



138 
1381 



lAAl 



All mineral industries. 



Metal mining 

Uranium-radium-vanadium ores. 



Bituminous coal. 



Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural 

Crude petroleum 

Natural gas 



Oil and gas field services: 
Drilling oil emd gas wells. 



Nonmetallic minerals mining. 
Sand and gravel 



172,133 

92,752 
75,880 

<i,698 

69,671 

55,880 

^8,202 

7,678 



6,854 
5,012 
2,069 



67,383 

38,430 
26,441 

3,578 

^25,466 

15,556 

11,589 

3,967 



4,157 
"^3,998 
■*1,709 



37,038 

32,949 
31,413 

{') 






36,338 

8,740 
6,645 

236 

26,928 

24,713 

21,805 

2,908 



1,961 
434 
122 



31,374 

12,633 
11,381 

884 

17,277 

15,611 

14,808 

803 



736 
580 
238 



59,106 

21,052 
17,283 

1,348 

35,745 

33,059 

26,292 

6,767 



1,285 
961 
368 



14,832 

1,923 
1,213 

193 

12,587 

12,554 

8,983 

3,571 



32 

129 

20 



44,274 

19,129 
16,070 

1,155 

23,158 

20,505 

17,309 

3,196 



1,253 
832 
348 



XXX 

^836 



3,121 

XXX 
XXX 

'48,033 
* 35, 272 



XXX 

7,258 



XXX 

56,279 
19,129 

XXX 

154,815 

142,805 

6,026 



''15,673 

XXX 



9,099 



XXX 

XXX 



XXX 
XXX 

'161 
^43,231 



XXX 
XXX 

*2,248 



XXX 
XXX 



XXX 

271 

465 

5,790 



XXX 



^Represents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or 
less minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

^Represents crude uranium-vanadium ores mined. 

''Figures for the cost of minerals received for preparation are included with those for the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased 
fuels and electricity, 

'Represents thousands of barrels of crude petroleum, field condensate, and drips shipped or used. 

^Represents millions of cubic feet of natural gas shipped. 

'Figures for primary products shipped or services performed in other industries are included with those for primary products shipped or services 
performed in the specified industry. 

'includes data for sand and gravel produced and used in the same establishment. For value of shipments, see also footnote 7. 



> MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 

Table 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Total 



Mining only 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Upen- 

plt 

mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods ^ 



Mines vd.th preparation plants 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 
rately 
oper- 
ated 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 



Nonpro- 

ducing 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 



10 



1094 



1211 



13 



lA 



1^1 



All industries: 

Number of establishments .... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Metal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Uranium-radium-vanadium ores: 
Number of establishments .... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Bituminous coal: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Oil and gas extraction: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Nonmetallio minerals mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 

Sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. . 



836 
12,3<W 

232,890 



358 
5,446 

67,357 



227 
2,500 

29,176 



105 
2,016 

16,348 



235 
■^3,893 

■'138,481 



138 
'1,078 

'll, 548 



55 
457 

5,639 



687 
11,722 

236,064 



269 
5,202 

67,674 



195 
2,436 

29,217 



105 
2,016 

16,348 



179 
*3,523 

*141,343 



134 
=1,070 

'11,543 



55 
457 

5,639 



513 
4,926 

153,626 



237 
1,275 

15,508 



185 
(D) 

(D) 



47 
187 

1,068 



166 
3,295 

135,297 



63 
169 

1,753 



(D) 
(D) 



244 
1,402 

16,349 



196 
1,227 

15,255 



163 
1,087 

13,707 



46 
(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



206 
1,913 



39 
(D) 

(D) 



146 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



58 
140 



1,634 



630 



171 
3,318 

135,364 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



166 
3,295 

135,297 



(D) 
(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



145 
5,256 

60,366 



21 
2,556 

35,567 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



56 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



45 
397 

4,958 



65 
4,373 

50,445 



12 
2,548 

35,522 



(D) 
(D) 

49 
1,674 

13,722 



4 
151 

1,201 



704 
,128 



45 



5 
105 

1,238 



54 
591 

6,845 



36 
348 

4,637 



12 
179 

1,793 



(D) 
(D) 



10 
(D) 

(D) 



321 



29 
1,540 

22,072 



11 
1,371 

16,599 



(D) 
(D) 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



13 
*228 

*6,046 



(D) 
(D) 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



149 
622 



89 
244 



32 

64 

(^) 



56 

370 

(3) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

■'■Includes data for 2 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was 
^Includes data for 3 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was 
^Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, 
expenditures . 

^Includes data for the Oil and Gas Exploration Services Industry, 
'includes data for the Nonmetallic Services, NEC, Industry. 



not specified, 
not specified, 
and purchased machinery installed exceeded capital 



COLORADO 



5-9 



Table 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establislunents, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 
or more 
employ- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts'' 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



195A' 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 



COLORADO: 

All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures. 

COUNTIES 



Adams , total 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 

Nonmetallio minerals mining 
(sand and gravel) 

Arapahoe (mineral industries 
only) 

Baca 

Bent 

Boulder (mineral industries 

only) 

Metal mining 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 
(including operations in 
manufactures ) 

Custer 

Delta 



Denver (mineral industries 
only): 

Including oil and gas 

extraction 

Excluding oil and gas 
extraction 



Dolores 

El Paso (mineral industries 
only) 

Fremont (mineral industries 
only) : 

Including oil and gas 

extraction 

Excluding oil and gas 

extraction 

Metal mining 



Garfield (mineral industries 
only) 



Grand 

Gunnison 

Huerfano 

Jackson 

Crude petroleum and natural 
gas 

Jefferson (mineral industries 
only) 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 
(mineral industries only) . . 

Lake 

La Plata (mineral industries 

only) 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 



Larimer (mineral industries 
only) 

Oil and gas extraction. . . . 

Las Animas 



Logan 

Crude petroleiim and natural 
gas 



992 
967 

25 



132 

129 

3 



U,273 
14,109 



193 
64 

43 

129 

156 
46 
32 

225 
96 

''143 
11 
61 



2,008 

93 
112 

167 



220 



211 
39 



283 

6 

428 

59 

134 

19 

154 

68 

1,577 

636 

321 

298 

68 
24 

923 

336 

170 



76,923 

76,236 

'687 



1,124 
378 

275 

746 

923 
248 

179 

1,196 
553 

■^677 

31 
200 



13,378 

486 
551 

851 



835 



781 
196 



1,535 
29 

1,810 
239 
699 

124 

767 

307 
(D) 

(D) 
2,057 

1,942 

324 
147 

(D) 

1,926 

1,108 



10,014 

9,854 

^160 



(MA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

97 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
90 

■^124 

11 

(NA) 



(NA) 

51 
(NA) 

138 



(NA) 

188 
35 



(NA) 
(NA) 
354 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

55 
1,269 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



19,340 

19,015 

325 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

262 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
167 

285 

18 

(NA) 



(NA) 

98 
(NA) 

273 

(NA) 

326 
94 

(NA) 
(NA) 
587 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

106 
(D) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



48,166 

47,493 

673 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

576 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
512 

550 

31 

(NA) 



(NA) 

210 
(NA) 

724 



(NA) 

679 
158 



(NA) 
(NA) 
1,464 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

261 
(D) 

(MA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



255,896 

249,446 

6,450 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

2,273 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
1,400 

1,482 

14 

(NA) 



(NA) 

370 
(NA) 

1,188 



(NA) 

2,000 
681 



(HA) 
(NA) 
3,808 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

923 
(D) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



*172,752 

172,133 

■^619 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

456 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
906 

*833 

29 

(NA) 



(NA) 

244 
(NA) 



(NA) 

2,047 
(D) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
2,542 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

340 
(D) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



369,520 

362,473 

7,047 



5,085 
2,375 

2,080 

2,710 

951 
575 
132 

4,186 
2,279 

2,123 

35 

422 



1,043 

564 
955 

1,723 



3,130 

2,963 
1,032 



(D) 

42 

5,861 

662 
4,646 

2,698 

1,873 

1,100 
(D) 

(D) 
4,063 

3,323 

1,524 
1,159 

(D) 

23,168 

17,876 



'59,128 

59,106 

'22 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(MA) 

19 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(MA) 

(NA) 
27 

'192 

8 

(NA) 



(MA) 

50 
(NA) 

133 



(NA) 

1,084 
(D) 



(MA) 
(NA) 
489 
(MA) 
(MA) 

(NA) 

(MA) 

163 
(D) 

(NA) 
(MA) 

(NA) 

(MA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(MA) 



13,690 

13,550 

'140 



8x99 
(NA) 

28 

(NA) 

31 
(NA) 
(NA) 

359 
142 

'214 
(NA) 
(NA) 



»564 

91 
899 



147 
(NA) 



»187 
(NA) 

247 
i°48 

880 

(NA) 



75 
1,586 

=264 
(NA) 

74 

8 lljg 

830 

1,271 
8159 

(NA) 



10 



'207,541 

*204,547 

2,994 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

316 
(NA) 
(NA) 

«2,661 
*1,207 

1,503 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(MA) 

*1,099 
(NA) 

'556 



(MA) 

'1,092 
(NA) 



6 9202 

(NA) 

1,242 

i°285 

(NA) 

(NA) 

'835 

814 
(D) 

(MA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

'■°5,226 

(MA) 



(NA) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



5-10 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 3.-General Statistics by Selected Industry Group, for Counties: 1958 and 1954-Continued 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 

or more 

enploy- 

ees 



All employees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts'' 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



195-;^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 



($1,000) 



10 

131 

138 
10 
12 
132 



13 
138 



10 
109 



131 
10 

138 



13 
131 



12 



10 



13 
131 



131 

12 

13 
131 

138 



COUNTIES— Continued 

Mesa; 

Including oil and gas 

extraction 

Excluding oil and gas 

extraction 

Metal mining 

Moffat , total 

Crude petroleum and natural 
gas 

Oil and gas field services.. 

^ Metal mining, Bituminous 
coal mining, and Natural 
gas liquids 



Monteztima 

Oil and gas extraction 

Oil and gas field services 

Montrose 

Metal mining 

Uranium-rad ium- vanad ium 
ores 



Morgan 

Crude petroleum and natural 
gas 

Ouray 

Park 

Provers 



Pueblo (mineral industries 
only) 



Rio Blanco 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 

Routt 

Bituminous coal mining 

San Juan 

San Miguel 

Summit ....• ••••..•...... 

Teller (mineral industries 
only) 

Washington 

Crude petroleum and natural 
gas 

Weld (mineral industries only) 
Crude petroleum and natural 

gas 

Bituminous coal mining 

Undistributed , total 

Crude petroleum and natural 
gas 

Oil and gas field services.. 



10 



793 

662 

577 

327 

108 
82 



137 

147 

108 

75 

677 
674 

602 
260 

98 

321 

26 

37 

58 

518 
512 

244 

192 
140 

48 

525 

45 

154 
295 

151 
357 

66 
209 

685 

419 
266 



4,184 

3,418 

3,008 

1,902 

704 
410 



742 
590 
375 

3,277 
3,262 

2,892 
1,457 
639 
(D) 
147 
185 

326 

3,032 
3,016 

1,590 

985 
724 

240 

(D) 

251 

584 
1,710 

984 
2,044 

430 
1,252 

4,130 

2,733 
1,397 



(NA) 

443 
374 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



94 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
637 

568 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(D) 

20 

(NA) 

46 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
126 

(NA) 

(NA) 

43 

136 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
189 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

895 
766 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



215 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
1,342 

1,200 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(D) 

36 

(NA) 

79 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
173 

(NA) 

(NA) 

94 

305 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
381 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

2,229 
1,894 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



564 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
3,079 

2,730 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(D) 
132 

(NA) 

179 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
648 

(NA) 

(NA) 

246 

530 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
1,139 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

9,863 
9,251 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
7,450 

6,782 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(D) 
295 

(NA) 

646 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
1,507 

(NA) 

(NA) 

312 

1,428 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
2,391 

INA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

10,235 
10,046 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



9,925 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
2,759 

2,492 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(D) 
(D) 

(NA) 

502 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
581 

(NA) 

(NA) 

184 

1,539 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
450 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



19,829 

19,246 
18,532 

11,618 

4,253 
1,249 



6,116 

1,603 
1,137 
1,119 

9,990 
9,560 

8,683 
27,652 

22,806 
(D) 
129 
180 

1,055 

76,049 
75,982 

71,452 

2,950 
1,778 

314 

(D) 

476 

2,889 
22,154 

18,014 
10,C51 

6,284 
2,720 

8,846 

4,787 
4,059 



(NA) 

852 
765 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



2,866 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
649 

591 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(D) 
(D) 

(NA) 

93 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
310 

(NA) 

(NA) 

20 

78 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
121 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



8471 

44-0 
(NA) 

8149 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

779 
(NA) 

723 
8209 

(NA) 
318 

(NA) 
=26 

32 

8370 
(NA) 

292 

8288 
278 

211 

245 

58 

239 
8103 

(NA) 
8404 

(NA) 
361 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

^584 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

^391 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(D) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

286 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
1,624 

^1,335 

(NA) 

(D) 

(D) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
2,260 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. NA Not available. 

■^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. ^Companies operating oil and gas field properties were 
permitted to make only one report for all oil and gas field operations in each State. Companies engaged only in performing oil and gas field or other 
mining services were permitted to make only one report for all States; these reports were classified on the basis of the principal State in which the 
service was performed. For 1958, such reports contained employment on March 15 and selected other data by State and county. For such operations, the 
State total figures shown for nxmber of establishments represent the number of reports received which were classified in the State and those for 
number of establishments in a county represent the number of reports that indicated any operations in the specified county. All county statistics 
shown for such operations which were not reported separately were obtained by allocating the totals reported for each company on the basis of reported 
county data. ^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the 
estimated value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment. "^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining 
operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machinery installed. Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, 
sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. ^Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 
'See table 2A, footnote 3. 8Excludes data for the Oil and Gas Field Services Industries. 'Excludes data for the Oil and Gas Extraction Indus- 
tries. ^"Represents the Bituminous Coal Industry only. ■'^•'' Includes data for operations in manufactures, ^^Not shown since the cost of 
supplies, purchases for resale, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded capital expenditures. 



COLORADO 



5-11 



Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Gold and silver ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 Metal mining services 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 
120 Bituminous coal 



12C Coal mining services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

141 Dimension stone 

141M Dimension stone in manufactures 

142 Crushed and broken stone 

142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 
144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel In manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals In manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonmetallic minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e. 

manufactures 



In 



(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, countyj and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 



In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



104 



105 



106 



108^ 109 



120 



12C^ 



131^ 



132 



138- 



141 



142 



144 



145 



147 



1481 



149 



149 
M 



Colorado, total. 
No employees. . 
1-4 enqployees. 
5-9 employees. 



10-19 employees 
20-49 employees 
50-99 employees 
100-249 employees 

250-499 eiig)loyees 
1,000 employees 
and over 



COUNTIES 

Adams ^ 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 enployees . . . 

Alamosa: 

0-19 employees 

Arapahoe: 

0-19 employees . 

20-99 employees... 

Archuleta: 

0-19 enjiloyees 

Baca: 

0-19 employees . 

Bent: 

0-19 employees 

Boulder: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 

Chaffee: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 en^jloyees . . . 

Cheyenne: 

0-19 employees .... 

Clear Creek: 

0-19 employees .... 

Conejos: 

0-19 enjjloyees .... 

Costilla: 

0-19 en5)loyees. 

Crowley: 

0-19 eniployees .... 

Custer: 

0-19 employees .... 

Delta: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Denver: 

0-19 employees.... 

20-99 employees 

100-249 employees. 



992 
173 
446 
139 

102 
81 
33 
10 



40 
1 



15 



64 

14 

3 



967 
172 
433 
134 

99 
78 
33 
10 



40 

1 



15 

1 



15 



21 
2 



12 



61 

14 

3 



25 
1 

13 
5 

3 
3 



252 

55 

129 

29 

16 

11 

7 

3 



105 

14 

50 

9 

11 

14 

4 

1 



13 



222 
38 
91 

37 

22 

16 

12 

5 



13 



^See table 3, footnote 2. 



5-12 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Tabic 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 



In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



104 



105 



106 



108- 



109 



120 



120^ 



131^ 



132 



138^ 



Ul 



142 



144 



145 



147 



lAS^ 



149 



149 
M 



COUNTIES — Continued 

Dolores: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 en?)loyees . . . 

Douglas: 

0-19 employees.... 

Eagle: 

0-19 employees.... 

250 enfiloyees and 

over 



Elbert: 

0-19 enployees.... 

El Paso: 

0-19 employees . . . . 
20-99 enployees... 

Fremont: 

0-19 employees . . . . 
20-99 employees . . . 

Garfield: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 

Gilpin: 

0-19 employees.... 

Grand: 

0-19 employees.... 

Gunnison: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Hinsdale: 

0-19 employees .... 

Huerfano: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Jackson: 

0-19 enjjloyees . . . . 
20-99 employees . . . 

Jefferson: 

0-19 enjiloyees . . . , 
20-99 employees . . . 

Kiowa: 

0-19 employees,... 

Kit Carson: 

0-19 employees.... 

Lake: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 
250 eii5)loyees and 
over 



La Plata: 

0-19 enployees.... 

20-99 employees . . . 

250 enployees and 

over 



Larimer: 

0-19 employees. . 
20-99 employees. 



54 
3 



19 
2 

1 



13 
9 



11 

1 



15 
1 



40 
1 



^See table 3, footnote 2. 



22 



11 



14 



19 



COLORADO 



5-13 



Tabic 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 19 58— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries' 



In- 
cluded 

In 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles )- 



101 



102 



103 



104 



105 



106 



108- 



109 



120 



UC' 



131' 



132 



1381 



Wl 



142 



144 



145 



147 



14a' 



149 



149 
M 



COUNTIES — ContI nued 

Las Animas: 

0-19 employees.... 

250 employees and 

over 



Lincoln: 

0-19 emsloyees . . . . 

Logan: 

0-19 engjloyees.... 
20-99 employees... 

Mesa: 

0-19 en?jloyees . . . . 
20-99 employees... 
100-249 eII^>lQyees. 

Mineral: 

0-19 employees . . . . 
20-99 en5)loyees. . . 

Moffat: 

0-19 enqjloyees . . . . 
20-99 employees . . . 

Montezuma: 

0-19 enqjloyees.... 
20-99 employees... 

Montrose: 

0-19 enjjloyees , . . . 
20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 en?)loyees. 

Morgan: 

0-19 employees . . . . 
20-99 employees... 

Otero: 

0-19 employees . . . . 

Ouray: 

0-19 eii?)loyees . . . . 
250 enjjloyees and 



Park: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 

Phillips: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 

Pitkin: 

0-19 employees . . . . 
20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 

Prowers : 

0-19 employees . . . . 

Pueblo: 

0-19 eii5)loyees . . . . 
20-99 enqjloyees . . . 

Rio Blanco: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 enqjloyees. 

Rio Grande; 

0-19 eii5)loyees . . . . 

Routt: 

0-19 enjiloyees . . . . 
20-99 enjjloyees . . . 



21 



^See table 3, footnote 2. 



5-14 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4.-Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries ■'• 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


12C^ 


1311 


132 


138^ 


141 


141 
M 


1^2 


142 
M 


r 

144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148^ 


149 


149 
M 


COUNTIES— Continued 

Saguache: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 

San Juan: 

0-19 employees... . 
20-99 employees... 

San Miguel: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees... 
250 employees and 


10 
2 

11 
1 

Al 
2 

1 

7 
1 

17 
3 

68 
5 

59 
5 

1 

95 
U 


10 
2 

11 
1 

41 
2 

1 

7 

1 

16 

3 

68 
5 

58 
5 

1 

95 
U 


... 


1 


... 


2 

1 

1 
1 

1 






1 


1 


5 

1 

2 


1 
5 


,.. 
















1 












































3 




... 


1 


1 




3 


















































> ■ • 


... 


... 


6 


28 
2 

1 


• • • 


... 


4 


1 


• • • 


■ • • 


• • • 
















































































Summit: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 

Teller: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Washington: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 

Weld: 

0-19 employees, ... 
20-99 employees... 

Yuma: 

0-19 en^jloyees.... 

Undistributed: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees,, . 




... 


• - • 


5 


1 


. , , 




1 
1 






























































1 




... 


... 


14 
3 














1 


- • • 


• • • 














2 










































37 
3 

28 


1 
1 


30 

1 

25 




































































1 


























4 


1 




































































1 

35 

1 
















































... 


60 

3 















































































































■■•See table 3, footnote 2. 



CONNECTICUT 

6-1 



6-2 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES— AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining by County.- 1958 



CONNECTICUT 

RANK AMONG STATES 
EMPLOYMENT -43 
VALUE OF SHIPMENTS -43 



^ MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

Q INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 



EMPLOYMENT 
8000 - 12000 
4000- 7999 
2000 - 3999 
1000- 1999 
500 - 999 
200 - 499 

25 - 199 





U. S. DffARTMENT OF COMMBtCE 
MMEAU Of THE CB4SUS 



CONNECTICUT 



6-3 



Tabic 1— General Statistics for Mineral Operations: 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of coluim captions see Introduction. For nore detailed historical statistics for this State, see table 1 of the corresponding 
chapter of the 1954 Census of Mineral Industries, Vol. II. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 





Establish- 
ments, 
number 






Production 


and 


Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 


Selected expenses ($1,000) 


Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 1 

($1,000) 


Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 

($1,000) 


Energy used 

(kwh 
equivalent) 






development workers 


Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale and 
purchased 
fuels and 
alec- 
trioity 


Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 


Con- 
tract 
work 


Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
In- 
stalled 


Kind of operation 
and year 


To- 
tal 


20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploye 
ees 


Number 


Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 


Number 


Man- 
hours 

a,ooo) 


Wages 
($1,000) 


Total 

(mil- 
lion) 


Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 


Mineral industries 
only: 
1958 


81 
91 

97 

104 

^63 

52 

41 

71 

^90 


12 

7 

12 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


859 

790 

^"927 
833 
706 
932 
615 
1,470 
1,648 


4,656 
3,445 

4,939 
3,682 
935 
1,621 
791 
812 
941 


664 

605 

^^730 
647 
635 
816 
543 
1,385 
^^1,497 


1,466 
1,437 

1,601 
1,580 
1,370 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


3,302 
2,464 

3,570 
2,696 
754 
1,307 
647 
729 
809 


9,396 
8,003 

^10,540 
9,228 
2,241 
3,711 
1,197 
1,163 
1,190 


3,581 
1,891 

^3,737 
^2,025 
700 
482 
425 
199 
236 


10 
36 

10 

37 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 


■ 407 
302 

=407 

=302 

21 

"27 
14 


763 
586 

3766 
^594 
(NA) 
252 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


12,986 
9,719 

^14,286 
11,079 
2,962 
4,193 
1,649 
1,376 
1,426 


1,171 
1,099 

^1,174 
^1,107 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


^162 
143 

"^^162 

^143 

95 

153 

992 

(NA) 

(NA) 


""kkk 


1954 

Including operations 
in manufactures: 

1958 

1954* 

1939= 

1929' 


236 

^222 
221 
150 
188 


1919' 


169 


1909' 

1902^° 


(NA) 
(NA) 







NA Not available. Revised. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations In manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of minerals 
produced and used in the same establishment. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of shipments (or production for 1919 and 1909) and 
contains duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for preparation. The approximate magnitude of this dupli- 
cation is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other years represents net production and excludes this 
duplication. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is included 
with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

■'Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'Except, in part, for value of shipments and value added, excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction with quarries. 
The value added in dressing granite at such operations was $45 thousand; this value has been included In the value of shipments and in value added in 
mining. The corresponding value for sandstone is not available. 

^Represents number of mines and quarries. 

'Excludes data for common clay and shale and peat mining operations. There were 12 such mines in 1939, with products valued at between $63 thousand 
and $173 thousand. 

'Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations. There were 10 such establishments in 1929, with products valued at $383 thousand. For 1919 
and 1902, excludes data for one nonproducing establishment. See also footnote 7. 

'Excludes purchased electricity. For 1929, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to only 5 percent of the total kwh equivalent of energy 
jsed. 

^"includes data for lime plants producing lime valued at $204 thousand. See also footnotes 7 and 8. 

^^Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 



Employment in Mining 

including Mining in Manufactures: 1902-1958 
CONNECTICUT 



1,500 



1,000 



500 









































1 




INCLUDED IN 

MANUFACTURES 


^ 



















1929 

CENSUS YEAR 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



195^ 1958 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



6-4 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind 
code 



l<i21 



1<W1 



Industry group and industry 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures. 



Crushed and broken stone (mineral 
industry only) 

Crtished and broken stone, nee, 
(minei'al subindustry) 



Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry. 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Total 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All en5)loyees 



Number 



927 
.859 



397 
338 

4-23 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



4,939 

4 656 

^283 



2,280 
1,944 

^2,280 

2,170 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



1-3 



^730 

664 

^^66 



312 

261 

338 
315 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



1,601 

1,466 

135 



730 
625 



714 
665 



Wages 
($1,000) 



3,570 

3,302 

268 



1,636 

1,417 

1,580 
1,470 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



10,540 

9,396 

^1,144 



3,971 

3,523 

5,503 
5,073 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



($1,000) 



^4,920 

4 761 

^159 



2,594 

2,145 

^2,128 
2,047 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



^14,286 
a2,986 
^1,300 



6,134 

5,302 

^6,928 
6,417 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



*1,174 

1,171 

*3 

431 

366 

(NA) 
703 



1954^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



333 
790 
343 



306 

294 

(NA) 
340 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



9,228 
8,003 
1,225 



3,338 

3,151 

(NA) 
3,810 



NA Not available. Revised. 

■"■Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machinery 
installed. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the number of production and development 
workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the saBE figures are 
included for production and development workers and for all enployees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes the estimated 
value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment at such operations. 

Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 



Table 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 





Industry group and industry 


Selected expenses ($1,000) 


Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 


Net shipments of primary products ■"■ 


Ind. 
code 


Total 


Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 


Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 


Con- 
tract 
work 


Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 


Total 


De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 


Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 


By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 


By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 




Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 


Value 
($1,000) 


Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 


Value 
($1,000) 




All mineral industries 


4,761 

2,594 
2,145 

2,047 


3,581 

2,019 
1,627 

^^1,457 


10 


407 

211 
211 

196 


763 

364 
307 

394 


1,171 

431 
366 

703 


4 
4 


1,167 

431 
366 

699 


XXX 

4,135 
3,728 

5,215 


XXX 

6,120 
5,290 

=6,687 


XXX 

^575 
413 

^566 


XXX 


1421 
1441 


Crushed and broken stone 

Crushed and broken stone, nee.. 

Sand and gravel 


741 
565 



■"■Represents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 
Includes minerals produced and used in the same establishment in making manufactured products. For sand and gravel, includes a small tonnage 
transferred to other establishments in the Sand and Gravel Industry for preparation. 

■^^Cost of minerals received for preparation is included with cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

^Figures for the value of primary products shipped in other industries are included with those for the value of primary products shipped in the 
specified industry. See also footnote 3. 



CONNECTICUT 



6-5 



Tabic 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of line imti column captions see Inlroriiiclion) 



Ind 
code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All type;; 

of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing estnblichments 



Minim; only 



llnrter- 
t; round 

ininiv; 



Open- 
pit 

ml nes 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods^ 



Mines with preparation plant;; 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



Ojjen- 

plt 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 


Nonpro 


rately 


ducing 


oper- 


estab- 


ated 


lish- 


prepa- 


ments 


ration 




plants 





1421 



1441 



All industries: 

Number of establishments. . . 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Crushed and broken stone: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Crushed and broken stone, nee: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 



80 
^859 



^,396 



17 
397 

3,971 



13 
338 



51 
«3 



79 
(D) 

(D) 



17 
397 

3,971 



13 
338 

3,523 



50 
(D) 

(D) 



18 

(D) 

(D) 



9 
(D) 

(D) 



U 
(D) 

(D) 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



5 
(D) 

(D) 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



•61 
799 



17 
397 

3,971 



13 
338 

3,523 



41 
402 

4,758 



53 
702 

7,636 



17 
397 



13 
338 



33 
305 



8 
97 

1,127 



97 
1,127 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

^Includes data for 3 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
^Includes data for 5 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified, 
'includes data for one metal mining services establishment. 



6-6 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



1 



Table 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind 
code 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number 



Total 



With 20 

or more 

eii?)loy- 

ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
purchased 
machinery 
installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 

($1,000) 



1954^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 



K 



K2 
144 



14 



14 



142 
144 



14 



CONNECTICUT: 

All mineral operations 

Mineral Industries 

Included in manufactures.. 

COUNTIES 
Fairfield 

Hartford, total 

Mineral Industries 

Included in manufactures.. 
Crushed and broken stone. . . . 
Sand and gravel (mineral 
industries only) 

Litchfield (mineral industries 
only) 

Middlesex (mineral industries 
only) 

New Haven, total 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures.. 
Crushed and broken stone. . . . 
Sand and gravel 

New London (mineral Industries 
only) 



'927 

859 

"^68 



113 

253 
235 
*18 
164 

67 



52 



35 
354 
319 
635 

174 
145 



71 



4,939 

4,656 

^283 



578 

1,207 
1,130 

760 

357 

209 



159 

2,065 

1,961 

*104 

1,184 

777 



457 



730 

664 

"666 



97 

207 
189 
^18 
133 

52 



42 



24 
254 
219 
635 

128 
91 



62 



1,601 

1,466 

135 



190 

458 

420 

38 

303 

110 



92 



46 
562 
514 

4S 
322 
192 



141 



3,570 

3,302 

268 



500 

991 

914 

77 

641 

260 



164 



102 
1,322 
1,218 
104 
776 
432 



274 



10,540 

9,396 

^^1,144 



1,333 

2,922 

2,504 

418 

1,559 

929 



293 

198 
3,908 
3,691 

217 
1,964 
1,727 

778 



^4,920 

4,761 

'159 



n4,286 



^A 



12,986 



667 

^1,248 

1,214 

334 

835 

378 
259 



150 

'1,877 

1,804 

'73 
1,310 

494 



499 



1,300 



1,763 

*3,859 

3,407 

*452 

2,268 

1,122 



514 



307 

■^5,373 

5,083 

*290 

3,034 

2,049 



1,217 



^1,174 

1,171 

= 3 



237 

(NA) 
311 

(NA) 
126 

185 



38 



41 
(NA) 
412 
(NA) 
240 
172 



60 



833 
790 
643 



111 

188 
174 
^14 
107 

60 



86 



57 

(NA) 

291 

(MA) 

168 

108 



36 



9,228 
8,003 
1,225 



1,223 

2,143 

2,039 

104 

1,241 

762 



476 



354 

(HA) 

3,166 

(NA) 

1,836 

1,138 



511 



i 



NA Not available. Revised. 

■'■Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Companies engaged only in mining services were required to make only one report for all States; these reports were classified on the basis of the 
principal State in vftiich the ser'vlce was performed. For 1958, such reports contained employment on March 15 and selected other data by State and county. 
For such operations, the State total figures shown for number of establishments represent the number of reports received which were classified in the 
State and those shown for number of establishments in a county represent the number of reports that indicated any operations in the specified county. 
All county statistics shown which were not reported separately were obtained by allocating the totals reported for each company on the basis of the 
reported covmty data. 

'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes -the cost of purchased 
machinery installed. 

''For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. Includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment. 

^Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

*See table 2A, footnote 3. 



CONNECTICUT 



6-7 



Tabic 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958 



101 
102 
103 
104 
105 
106 
108 
109 
120 



Iron ores 

Copper ores 

Lead and zinc ores 

Gold and silver ores 

Bauxite 

Ferroalloy ores 

Metal mining services 

Miscellaneous metal ores 

Bituminous coal and lignite 



12C Coal mining services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

HI Dimension stone 

lAlM Dimension stone In manufactures 

1A2 Crushed and broken stone 

1A2M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 

144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel In manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonmetallic minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.o. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c, in 

manufactures 







(Counties and s 


ize 


classes 


In which 


no 


mineral operations were 


reported 


are 


omitted ) 


















All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, covmty, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


12C^ 


131^ 


132 


138^ 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


U8^ 


149 


149 
M 


Connecticut, total, , 


97 

7 

34 

18 

26 

10 
2 

12 

1 

25 

3 

8 

8 

17 
5 

7 
2 

6 

4 


81 

5 

26 

16 

22 

10 
2 

12 

1 

19 
3 

7 

7 

12 
5 

5 
2 

6 

3 


16 
2 
8 
2 

4 














1 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


... 


6 

1 
5 


3 
2 


17 

"4 

6 
5 
2 

1 


1 
1 


51 

1 

19 

12 

15 
4 


5 
"2 

3 


2 

1 

1 


7 
2 
4 

1 


... 




4 
3 

1 




No employees 
















1-4 employees 
























5-9 employees 
























10-19 employees... 






























1 




20—49 employees . . , 














1 


... 


... 


... 












50-99 employees... 








































COUNTY 

Fairfield: 

0-19 employees. . . . 
















1 




















10 

1 

11 
















20-99 employees... 

Hartford : 

0-19 employees. . . . 








































6 






















• • • 


■ • • 


• • • 


2 


• • • 


4 
3 

2 


• • • 


2 


. . . 


4 






2 




20-99 employees... 
























Utchfield: 
0-19 employees.... 

Middlesex : 

0-19 employees .... 

New Haven: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees . . . 

New London: 
0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 

Tolland: 

0-19 employees.... 

Windham: 

0-19 employees.... 


1 
1 
5 














1 


... 


... 


... 












1 


4 

3 

9 
2 

4 

1 

4 
2 






































2 


2 


1 
2 


... 


... 


2 
































1 


3 
3 

1 


... 


































2 






















• • • 


• • • 


• • • 


1 


1 


1 




































































... 


... 


... 


2 

1 


1 
















1 







































































^See table 3, footnote 2. 



I 



FLORIDA 

7-1 



7-2 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES— AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining by County.- 1958 

FLORIDA 



^ MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

Q INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 



EMPLOYMENT 

8000- 12000 

4000- 7999 

2000- 3999 — -. 
1000- 1999 — ^ 

500 - 999 

200 - 499 

25- 199 — " 



RANK AMONG STATES 

EMPLOYMENT - 25 
VALUE OF SHIPMENTS -22 





OFFSHORE© 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



..>X'. 



MINING IN FLORIDA 

Employment For Industry Group By County: 1958 



7-3 



Metal Mining 




01^- ' 



Oil and Gas Extraction 




^•■ 



Geoefal Extent o< Oil and Gas Fields 



Coal Mining 




NO PRODUCTION OR DEVELOPMENT 
OPERATIONS WERE REPORTED 



^- 



Nonmetallic Minera 

( — 7 — 1 — ' — ' — '' — ^ 


Is Mining 




XW-^ 


.« 


rT^^TZl 


^ ^ 


"A. 


/^ 






yjuci^ 


• 


V 


\\ 




u^ \ 


Lj • 


;5\vV 








xl?T« )^\ 








^r^ ' 


K> 


UIHERAL IHDUSTSIES 

INCLUDED IH MANUFACTURES 


Viv 




\\^^^ 


i 


i^o 


•\- 


• 




(^ 




\.^ 


-'' ' 


_/\ 






Y 


C] 




^ 


^ • 




y • 


o 




'\, 






..^=- -' 





u. s. o^MTMan Of commsice 




BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



7-4 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 1— General Statistics for Mineral Operations: 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of column captlcms see Introduction. For more detailed historical statistics for this dtate, see table 1 of the corresponding 
chapter of the 195A Census of Mineral Industries, Vol. II. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 





Establish- 
ments, 
number 






Production 


and 


Value 
added 

in 
mining 

($1,000) 


Selected expenses ($1,000) 


Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 1 

($1,000) 


Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 

($1,000) 


Energy used 

(kwh 
equivalent) 






development workers 


Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 


Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 


Con- 
tract 
work 


Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
in- 
atalled 


Kind of operation 
and year 


To- 
tal 


20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 


Number 


Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 


Number 


Man- 
hours 

a,ooo) 


Wages 
($1,000) 


Total 

(mil- 
lion) 


Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 


Mineral industries 
only: 

1958 

1954 

Including operations 
in manufactures: 

1958 

195A* 


206 
193 

220 

199 

*86 

66 

36 

36 

67^ 


69 

54 

72 
57 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


1-6, 694 
6,796 

r6,921 
6,889 
3,468 
3,567 
3,686 
5,518 
3,394 


r29,062 
26,080 

^30,133 
26,426 
3,190 
4,139 
3,774 
2,847 
1,321 


5,483 
5,532 

5,708 
5,625 
3,083 
3,173 
3,372 
5,214 
^^3,161 


11,689 
12,951 

12,142 
13,137 
6,017 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


22,022 
19,610 

23,085 
19,956 
2,415 
3,152 
3,108 
2,351 
1,087 


82,652 
■^267,366 

87,436 

8,143 
10,112 
5,332 
6,667 
2,306 


29,588 
24,798 

230, 556 
=25,170 
3,045 
3,875 
3,523 
1,962 
631 


38,712 
32,291 

%8,712 

32,291 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 


4,354 
4,952 

24,354 

=4,953 

43 

28 

121 

218 

7 


9,573 
11,067 

39,573 
^1,071 
(NA) 
766 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


153,198 
^^124, 839 

158,950 

■•2126,550 

11,231 

14,015 

8,976 

8,847 

2,944 


11,681 
15,634 

'11,681 
"15,636 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


^2, 909 
3,094 

"2,909 

^3,094 

1,046 

1,471 

'1,868 

(NA) 

(NA) 


"531 
559 

^510 
550 


1939' 


339 


1929'' 


464 


1919^ 

1909^ 


554 
(NA) 


1902^° 


(NA) 







NA Not available. Revised. 

■"■For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of minerals 
produced and used in the same establishment. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of shipments (or production for 1919 and 1909) and 
contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for preparation. The approximate magnitude of this 
duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For all other years represents net production and excludes 
this duplication. 

=For stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work and for 1958 the cost of minerals 
received for preparation is included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

•'Excludes data for stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Except for value of shipments and value added, excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction with quarries. The value 
added in dressing limestone at such operations was $57 thousand; this value has been Included in the value of shipments and value added in mining. 

^Represents number of mines and quarries and, for mining services industries, number of operating companies. 

'Excludes data for common clay and shale and peat operations and for one nonproducing limestone operation. In 1939, there were 4 such clay and 
peat mines, with products of the 3 clay operations valued at $25 thousand. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations and stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime plants. In 1929, there were 9 such 
sand and gravel operations, with products valued at $490 thousand, and 2 such stone quarries. See also footnote 7. Also, excludes data for non- 
producing phosphate rock operations: for 1919, one mine; and for 1909, 2 mines. 

'Excludes purchased electricity. For 1929, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to 7 percent of the total kwh equivalent of energy used. 

■"■"Excludes data for sand, gravel, common clay, and shale mining operations. Includes data for lime plants producing lime valued at $38 thousand. 

■'■■'■Figures for average enployment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 

"""^Excludes data for the Uranium-Rad ium-Vanadium Ores Industry. 



Employment in Mining 

Including Mining in Manufactures: 1902- 1958 
FLORIDA 



METAL MINING AND OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION 
NONMETALLIC MINERALS MINING 



INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 



1929 

CENSUS YEAR 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



1954 1958 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



FLORIDA 



7-5 



Tabic 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group and Industry 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Total 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All employees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Pi-oduction and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added In 

mining 



($1,000) 



COKt Of 

supplies, 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



1 1,0 00) 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added In 

mining 



($1,000) 



1311 
K21 



1441 



1475 

and 
14S 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures.. 

Crude petroleum and natural gas. 

Crushed and broken stone 

(mineral industry only) 

Crushed and broken limestone 

(mineral subindustry only) . . . 

Crushed and broken stone, nee 

(mineral subindustry) 



Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures. 



Clay and related minerals. 



1 Phosphate rock and Nonmetallic 
I mineral services 



220 
206 

14 

12 



37 



^6,921 

r6,694 

5227 



134 

1,789 

1,675 

«114 

802 

664 

^138 

189 

3,278 



1-30, 133 

'"29,062 

"l,071 

853 



7,571 

6,989 

^582 

3,248 

2,663 

3585 

566 

14,717 



5,708 

5 483 

^225 



71 

1,514 

1,415 

99 

711 
573 
^138 

174 
2,714 



12,142 

11,689 

453 

169 



3,422 

3,154 

268 

1,609 

1,334 

275 

324 
5,675 



23,085 

22,022 

1,063 

451 



6,036 

5,566 

470 

2,640 

2,055 

585 

464 
11.465 



87,436 
82,652 

4,784 

(*) 



20,673 

19,446 

1,227 

9,435 
6,622 
2,813 

1,480 
47,936 



=83,195 
82,227 

2QAft 



1,875 

10,964 

9,898 

1,066 

23,947 

3 618 

^329 

561 
60,912 



^158,950 

153,198 

^5,752 

1,004 



28,444 

26,249 

2,195 

^12,619 
9,477 
^3,142 

1,899 
104,432 



(NA) 

11,681 

(NA) 

846 



3,193 

3,095 

98 

(NA) 
763 
(NA) 

■7142 
4,416 



6,889 

6,796 

393 

(NA) 



51,216 

1,119 

(NA) 

(NA) 
324 
(NA) 

530 
4,027 



68,701 

67,365 

1,336 

(NA) 



511,708 

10,469 

(NA) 

(NA) 

2,421 

(NA) 

4,218 
46,474 



NA Not available. Revised. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^For stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machinery Installed. 

■'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the n\iinber of production and development 
workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same figures are 
included for production and development workers and for all enployees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts Includes the estimated 
value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment at such operations. 

Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, minerals received for preparation, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and 
purchased machinery installed exceeded the sum of the value of shipments and receipts and capital expenditures. 

^Includes data for 4 quarrying operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Includes data for separately reported central offices and related facilities in the Crushed and Broken Granite Subindustry. 

''Excludes data for mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 



Table 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries; 1958 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 





Industry group and industry 


Selected expenses ($1,000) 


Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 


Net shipments of primary products ■"■ 


Ind. 
code 


Total 


Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 


Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 


Con- 
tract 
work 


Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 


Total 


De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 


Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment 2 


By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 


By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 




Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 


Value 
($1,000) 


Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 


Value 
($1,000) 


1421 

1441 

1471 
and 


All mineral industries 

Crushed and broken stone 

Crushed and broken limestone.. 

Sand and gravel 

1 Phosphate rock and Nonmetallic 


82,227 

10,964 
9,898 

3,618 
60,912 


29,588 

6,818 
5,878 

■^2,568 
16,806 


38,712 

39 
39 

(*) 
38,655 


4,354 

2,256 
2,243 

523 
183 


9,573 

1,851 
1,738 

527 
5,268 


U,68l 

3,193 
3,095 

763 
4,416 


968 

62 
62 

32 
66 


10,713 

3,131 
3,033 

731 
4,350 


XXX 

20,412 
17,890 

10,701 
12,136 


XXX 

25,406 
23,413 

'12,054 
75,888 


XXX 

^1,199 
(D) 

^3,133 


XXX 

658 

(D) 

(') 


148 







D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

■'■Represents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the Industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

^Includes data for minerals produced and used in the same manufacturing establishment. For stone, the value of such stone is not included in the 
succeeding column. 

■^The cost of minerals received for preparation is included with the cost of si^jplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

'The value of primary products shipped in other industries is included with the value of primary products shipped in the specified industry. The 
combined figure shown includes the estimated value of minerals produced and used in the same manufactvuring establishment. 



7-6 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Mining only 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods ^ 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 
rately 
oper- 
ated 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 



Nonpro- 
ducing 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 



U21 



i<;^i 



U75 



All establishments: 

Number of establishments.., 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Crushed and broken stone: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining... $1,000, 

Crushed and broken limestone: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees , . . 

Value added in 
mining $1,000, 

Sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining.. .$1,000. 

Phosphate rock: 

Number of establishments 

Number of enployees 

Value added in mining... $1,000. 



200 
6,636 

S2,512 



76 

1,789 

20,673 



69 
1,675 

19,446 



63 

664 

6,622 



188 
6,524 

83,442 



76 

1,789 

20,673 



69 
1,675 

19,446 



63 

664 

6,622 



32 
(D) 
(D) 



31 
(D) 
(D) 



34 
355 

4,927 



2 
(D) 
(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



22 

103 
954 



(D) 
(D) 



23 
278 



3,556 



2 
(D) 
(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



12 
406 



7 
(D) 
(D) 



11 
77 

1,371 



143 
5,371 

67,049 



70 

1,669 

16,500 



10 

63 

548 



64 
(D) 

(D) 



41 

561 

5,668 



19 

2,560 

39,660 



134 
5,231 

65,658 



70 

1,669 

16,500 



64 
(D) 

(D) 



32 

421 

4,277 



19 

2,560 

39,660 



9 
140 



1,391 



U 
798 



11,466 



4 
(D) 
(D) 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



9 

140 

1,391 



5 

673 

7,928 



12 
112 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

■"■Includes data for 6 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 

^Includes data for 2 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 

■'Not shovm since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract ■work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded capital expendi- 



tures. 



FLORIDA 



7-7 



Tabic 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number ^ 



Total 



With 20 

or more 

enploy- 

ees 



All enployees 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts' 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



1954' 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 



FLORIDA: 

All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures.. 



COUNTIES 



Alachua. 



Broward (mineral industries 
only) 



Citrus.. 
Collier. 



Dade: 

Including operations in 
manufactures 

Mineral industries only. . . 

Crushed and broken stone 
(mineral industry only) .... 

Duval (including operations 
in manufactures ) 



Escaoibla. 
Gadsden. . 
Hernando. 



Hillsborough (including 
operations in manufactures ) . . 



Lake. 



Lee. 



Leon. 
Levy. 



Marian 

Crushed and broken stone.. 



Palm Beach. 
Pinellas... 



Polk 

PhoSDhate rock. 



Putnam 

Sunrter 

Walton 

Undistributed. 



220 
206 



6,890 

6 663 

4227 



126 

=182 
23 

50 

*647 
619 

A37 

'*175 

79 

216 

529 

38 

66 

35 

80 

231 
117 

35 

31 

2,971 
2,823 

112 

64 

A 

56 



29,9A8 
28 ,877 
■'1,071 



346 

'1,003 

60 

218 

^3,056 
2,911 

2,032 

■^832 

241 

677 

2,327 

*1,926 

123 

313 

180 

216 

877 
460 

139 

105 

13,433 
12,779 

404 

230 

17 

233 



-L. 



_L 



5,708 

5,483 

*225 



116 

134 
21 

(NA) 

''sis 

489 
338 

"141 
(NA) 
(NA) 
503 

*392 
35 

(NA) 

(NA) 

71 

184 
77 

(NA) 

26 

2,422 
2,303 

96 

60 

(NA) 

(NA) 



12,142 

11,689 

453 



202 

345 
35 

(NA) 

1,122 
1,067 

727 

292 
(NA) 
(NA) 

987 

887 

86 

(NA) 

(NA) 

119 

413 
147 

(NA) 

33 

5,000 
4,740 

216 

168 

(NA) 

(NA) 



23,085 

22,022 

1,063 



315 

670 

43 
(NA) 

2,283 
2,146 

1,54S 

593 

(NA) 

(NA) 

2,096 

1,728 

116 

(NA) 

(NA) 

190 

619 
237 

(NA) 

83 

10,237 
9,785 

313 

214 

(NA) 

(NA) 



87,436 

82,652 

4,784 



610 

3,046 
203 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

6,944 

1,081 
(NA) 
(NA) 

5,760 

7,500 

310 

(NA) 

(NA) 

581 

1,375 
695 

(NA) 

339 

44,190 
42,452 

886 

702 

(NA) 

(NA) 



'83,195 

82.227 

^968 



312 

2,048 

(D) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

4,081 

(D) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

2,104 

'2,190 

114 

(NA) 

(NA) 

175 

769 
(D) 

(NA) 

209 

59,4S7 
58,886 

689 

(D) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



*158,950 

153,198 

*5,752 



752 

4,916 

240 

1,469 

■'13,062 
12,347 

9,898 

■'1,582 

355 

1,988 

7,134 

■'9,335 

369 

1,085 

306 

731 

2,009 
1,078 

551 

389 

99,498 
97,307 

1,373 

952 

98 

307 



(NA) 

11,681 

(NA) 



170 

178 
(D) 

(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 



1,127 

(D) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
730 

'355 

55 

(NA) 

(NA) 

25 

135 
(D) 

(NA) 

159 

4,179 
4,031 

202 

(D) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



6,889 

6,796 

■'93 



(NA) 

95 
125 
*26 

6355 
(NA) 

273 
(NA) 

511 
339 

^263 
(NA) 
(NA) 
652 

76 

164 
(NA) 

39 

(NA) 

3,739 
3,581 

129 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



68,701 

67,365 

1,336 



(NA) 

1,604 
758 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

2,903 

(NA) 

C) 

3,627 

3,331 

(D) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

601 

890 
(NA) 

359 

(NA) 

43,463 
42,157 

654 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual conpanies. 

NA Not available. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operatlans in manufacturing establishments. 

^Coii5)anies operating oil and gas field properties were permitted to make only one report for all oil and gas field operations in each State. Com- 
panies engaged only in performing oil and gas field or other mining services were permitted to make only one report for all States; these reports 
were classified on the basis of the principal State in which the service was performed. For 1958, such reports contained enployment on March 15 and 
selected other data by State and county. For such operations, the State total figures shown for number of establishments represent the number of 
reports received which were classified in the State and those shown for number of establishments in a county represent the number of reports that 
indicated any operations in the specified county. All county statistics shown which were not reported separately were obtained by allocating the 
totals reported for each con^any on the basis of the reported county data. 

'For stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machinery Installed. 

*See table 2A, footnote 3. 

'includes data for separately reported central offices and related facilities in the Oil and Gas Extraction Industries. 

^Excludes data for Oil and Gas Field Services Industries. 

''Not shown since the cost of s'^jplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded the value of 
shipments plus capital expenditures. 

^Represents mineral industries only. 

'Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 



7-8 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4 —Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Gold and silver ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 Metal mining services 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 
120 Bituminous coal and liguite 



12C Coal mining services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

141 Dimension stone 

141M Dimension stone in manufactures 

142 Crushed and broken stone 

142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 
144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel in manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonmetallic minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, 
149M Miscellaneous minerals 

manufactures 



n.e. 
n.e. 



In 



(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 



In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



104 



105 



106 



108^ 109 



120 



12C^ 



131^ 



132 



138^ 



141 



142 



144 



145 



147 



148^ 



149 



149 
M 



Florida, total.. 
No employees.. 
1-4 employees. 
5-9 employees. 



220 

7 

63 

39 

39 
39 
13 
18 

1 
1 



11 
4 



10-19 employees... 
20-49 employees . . . 
50-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 

250-499 employees. 
500-999 employees. 

COUNTIES 

Alachua: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 
20-99 employees . . . 

Baker: 

0-19 employees . . . . 

Bay: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 

Brevard: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees . . , 

Broward: 

0-19 eiployees . . . . 
20-99 employees . . . 

Charlotte: 

0-19 enploy ees . . . , 

Citrus: 

0-19 enploy ees . . . . 

Clay: 

0-19 employees . . . . 
20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 

Collier: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 eii5)loyees. . . 

Dade: 

0-19 employees . . . . 
20-99 employees... 

Dixie: 

0-19 en^jloy ees . . . . 

Duval: 

0-19 employees . . . . 
100-249 employees. 

Escambia: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 
20-99 employees . . . 

Flagler: 

20-99 employees . . . 

Franklin: 

0-19 enployees . . . , 



^See table 3, footnote 2. 



23 
12 



206 

7 

58 

35 

37 
37 
12 
18 

1 
1 



11 
3 



18 
12 



14 



FLORIDA 



7-9 



Tabic 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and slie classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied In 
mineral 
indus- 
triesl 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


1081 


109 


120 


12C^ 


1311 


132 


1381 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


14^1 


149 


149 
M 


COUNTIES— Con. 

Gadsden: 

0-19 e]i?)loyees.... 
20-99 einployees... 
100-249 enployees. 

Glades: 

0-19 enployees.... 

Hendiy: 

0-19 engjloyees,... 

Hernando : 

0-19 pmpi nyppH .... 


4 
2 

1 

2 

2 

2 

2 
2 

7 
2 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

2 

4 

1 

5 

1 

8 

5 

1 

1 
1 

8 

3 

2 

2 

8 

2 

4 

10 

7 

11 

2 


4 
2 

1 

2 

2 

2 
2 
2 

5 

1 
1 

1 
1 

1 

2 

4 

1 

5 

1 

8 

5 

1 

1 
1 

8 

3 

1 

2 

8 

2 

4 

10 

7 

11 

2 




















... 


... 


1 




1 










1 
2 










1 












































































1 






























... 


... 


2 

1 






























... 


... 


1 

2 
2 
2 


1 




















































20-99 eu^jloyees . . . 














































100-2'i9 employees. 














































Hillsborough: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 
20-99 en^jloyees . . . 


2 

1 




























2 


1 


... 


1 


1 
1 


... 


3 


































100-249 eii5)loyees. 

Holmes: 

0-19 eii5)loyees . . . . 

Indian River: 

0-19 engjloyees.. . . 
20-99 employees... 

Jackson: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 

Lafayette: 

0-19 eii?)loyees .... 

Lake: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 
20-99 eiiployees . . . 

Lee: 

0-19 engjloyees .... 
20-99 eii5)loyees... 

Leon: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Levy: 

0-19 enjjloyees .... 
20-99 enjjloyees . . . 

Manatee: 

0-19 ei^jloyees .... 
20-99 enployees... 

Marion: 

0-19 en^iloyees.... 
20-99 enployees... 

Monroe: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Orange: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 

Palm Beach: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 

Pasco: 

0-19 eii?)loyees . . . . 

Pinellas: 

0-19 eii5>loyees . . . . 

Polk: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 
20-99 e]i5)lcryees... 
100-249 enpioyees. 
250 employees 
and over . 


































1 
































1 


1 


































































1 
























































1 
1 


... 














































1 

3 

1 

1 




















































1 


• > • 
































































1 


• • ■ 


3 














































1 




































4 


... 


1 






3 






































5 

1 

1 
1 

3 
2 


... 
























































































































































































4 

1 


1 


... 










































1 




























1 


1 














































2 

1 






















... 


... 


1 


... 


... 


2 
2 

1 


... 


4 








































































3 

6 
3 












































... 


... 


... 


2 

4 

11 

2 


2 


... 































































































































































i-See table 3, footnote 2. 



7-10 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4.-Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


lOA 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


120^ 


131^ 


132 


1381 


lAl 


Ul 
M 


U2 


142 

M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148^ 


149 


149 
M 


COUNTIES— Con. 

Putnam: 

0-19 einployees . . . . 
20-99 employees . . . 

St. Johns: 

0-19 employees .... 

St. Lucie: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Santa Rosa: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Sarasota: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 


7 

2 

1 

2 

1 

1 

2 

1 

1 
2 

3 

1 

1 
2 

1 

3 

1 
1 

11 


7 
2 

1 

1 
1 

1 

2 

1 

1 
2 

3 

1 

1 

2 

1 

3 

1 
1 

11 




















... 


... 
















4 

1 

1 
1 




1 
1 








2 








































































1 






























1 
































1 












































... 


1 
1 
















































1 
1 

1 
2 

1 
1 


... 




















































Sumter: 

0-19 enployees .... 














































20-99 employees . . . 














































Suwannee: 

0-1 9 ^mpl nyf^ppi .... 


















• .> 


... 


• • • 


... 






1 
















20-99 enployees... 

Taylor: 

0-19 enjployees .... 

Volusia: 

0-19 eii5>loyees .... 
















































... 


... 


1 
















































2 
















Wakulla: 

0-19 eiployees .... 

Walton: 

0-19 employees .... 

Off snore: 

0-19 enployees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Undistributed: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 




















1 


... 


1 
3 

1 










































































































































































7 





































































i 



^See table 3, footnote 2. 



GEORGIA 

8-1 



;-2 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES— AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining by County: 1958 



GEORGIA 



RANK AMONG STATES 
EMPLOYMENT -28 
VALUE OF SHIPMENTS -29 



p MINERAL INDUSTRIES 
Q INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 



EMPLOYMENT 
8000 - 12000 
4000- 7999 
2000- 3999 
1000- 1999 
500 - 999 
200 - 499 

25 - 199 




U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



MINING IN GEORGIA 

Employment For Industry Group By County: 1958 



8-3 



Nonmetallic Minerals Mining 




Employment in Mining 

Including Mining in Manufactures: 1902-1958 
GEORGIA 



I METAL MINING 

I NONMETALLIC MINERALS MINING 



|4 



INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 



1902 1909 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



1929 

CENSUS YEAR 



195^ 1958 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



8-4 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 1.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations; 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction. For more detailed historical statistics for this State, see table 1 of the corresponding 
chapter of the 195'i Census of Mineral Industries, Vol. II. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 



Kind of operation 
and year 



Establish- 
ments, 
number 



To- 
tal 



20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
in- 
stalled 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts •' 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



Energy used 

(kwh 
equivalent ) 



Total 

(mil- 
lion) 



Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 



Mineral industries 
only: 

1958 

1954 



Including operations 
in manufactures: 

1958 

195'i'' 

1939' 

1929' 

1919^ 

1909' 

1902^° 



173 
192 



202 

220 

'110 

82 

74 

94 

'158 



70 

58 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(HA) 
(MA.) 
(NA) 



5,201 
4,354 



6,182 
5,286 
3,906 
4,026 

2,575 
3,606 

3,171 



19,575 
13,297 



22,737 

15,742 

2,808 

3,647 

2,372 
1,468 
1,319 



4,500 
3,928 



5,393 
4,782 
3,674 
3,752 

2,397 

3,411 

^2,860 



9,669 
8,783 



11,378 

10,490 

7,440 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



15,591 
10,957 



18,273 

13,016 

2,279 

2,969 

2,017 
1,278 
1,101 



52,022 
32,724 



58,048 

37,326 

5,864 

7,473 

3,082 
2,472 
2,421 



21,546 
11,167 



^23,322 

^12,160 

2,204 

1,792 

947 
401 
573 



879 
613 



2879 

647 

(NA) 

(NA) 

18 

(NA) 



1,128 
1,297 



^1,151 

^1,311 

130 

346 

35 
2 

123 



6,996 
4,192 



^7,278 

^4,309 

(NA) 

188 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



74,746 
43,439 



82,545 

49,066 

8,198 

9,611 

4,082 
2,875 
3,117 



7,825 
6,554 



^8,133 

'6,687 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



■1,880 

1,317 



'1,905 

'1,339 

770 

952 

»464 
(NA) 
(NA) 



'4l8 
335 



'553 
280 
210 
254 

194 
(NA) 
(NA) 



NA Not available. Revised. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of shipments (or production for 1919 
and 1909) and contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for preparation. The approximate 
magnitude of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other years represents net 
production and excludes this duplication. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is 
included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. AJ.SO for 1958, the cost of minerals received for 
preparation at dimension stone operations in manufacturing industries is included with supplies. 

"'Excludes data for crushed and broiten stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations m manufacturing establ.ishments . 

■^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'Excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction with quarries and for one nonproducing bauxite mine. 

'Represents number of mines and quarries and, for mining services industries, number of operating companies. 

'Excludes data for common clay and shale mining operations. In 1939, there were 11 such mines with products valued at $168 thousand. 

Excludes data for common sand and gravel mining operations, limestone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime plants, and for 
nonproducing establishments. In 1929, there were 5 such sand and gravel establishments with products valued at $172 thousand, and 3 such 
limestone quarries. See also footnote 7. 

'Excludes purchased electricity. For 1929, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to only 2 percent of the total kwh equivalent 
of energy used . 

■^"Excludes data for sand, gravel, common clay, and shale mining operations. Includes data for 2 cement plants and for lime plants producing 
lime valued at $72 thousand . 

■"^ ■'■Figures for average employment were reduced to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 

^Revised. 



GEORGIA 



8-5 



Table 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanaticai of oolunm captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Industry group and industry 



Total 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All employees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 



(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



:95A^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



10 & 
13 



12 



U 



lAll 



1421 



145 



U55 



1496 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures . 

Metal mining and Oil and gas 
extraction 



Bituminous coal mining. 



Nonmetallic minerals mining. 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures... 

Dimension stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures. 
Dimension granite 



Crushed and broken stone (miner- 
al industry only) 

Crushed and broken limestone 
(mineral subindustry only) . . . 

Crushed and broken granite 
(mineral subindustry) 

Crushed and broken stone, nee 
(mineral subindustry only) . . . 

Sand and gravel (mineral 
industry only) 



Clay and related minerals . . . . 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures. 



Kaolin and ball clay 

Clay and related minerals, nee. 

Miscellaneous minerals, nee: 
Talc, soapstone, pyrophyllite . . . 



202 

173 

29 



23 



174 
145 
29 
34 
23 
11 
28 



6,182 

5,201 

'981 



14 

6,074 

5,093 

^981 

1,106 

266 

840 

636 



1,424 
193 
778 
453 

463 

2,764 

2,672 

392 

2,157 
^142 

100 



22,737 
19,575 
'3,162 



268 

35 

22,434 

19,272 

'3,162 

3,269 

664 

2,605 

1,880 



5,233 

•729 

2,759 

1,745 

1,612 

11,283 

10,933 

'350 

8,970 
'564 



226 



5,393 

4,500 

'893 



13 



5,300 

4,407 

'893 

1,002 

250 

752 

579 



1,238 
173 
663 
402 

436 

2,336 

2,244 

'92 

1,822 
'135 

85 



11,378 
9,669 
1,709 



110 

19 

11,249 
9,540 
1,709 
1,855 

429 
1,426 

998 



2,884 

404 

1,473 

1,007 

858 

4,993 

4,810 

183 

3,854 
278 

166 



18,273 

15,591 

2,682 



224 

34 

18,015 
15,333 
2,682 
2,749 
624 
2,125 
1,577 



4,181 

581 

2,146 

1,454 

1,485 

8,711 

8,361 

350 

6,914 
517 

169 



58,048 

52,022 

6,026 



812 

4S 

57,188 
51,162 
6,026 
4,751 
1,147 
3,604 
2,868 



17,898 
2,435 
9,009 
6,454 

3,776 

27,824 

26,149 

1,675 

20,963 
2,011 

310 



^32,630 
30,549 
=2,081 



2 31, 674 

29,593 

=2,081 

2,270 

611 

1,659 

1,588 



11,784 
1,999 
5,663 
4,122 

1,844 

=14,461 

14,190 

=271 

11,201 
=476 

186 



'82,545 
74,746 
'7,799 



1,590 



'80,902 
73,103 
'7,799 
6,665 
1,710 
4,955 
4,299 



26,392 
4,093 

12,880 
9,419 

5,258 

'38,646 
36,700 
'1,946 

29,081 
'2,460 

462 



''8,133 

7,825 

^308 



171 



*7,960 

7,652 

■'308 

356 

48 

308 

157 



3,290 

341 

1,792 

1,157 

362 

''3,639 

3,639 

(NA) 

3,083 
''27 

34 



5,286 

4,354 

'932 



5,110 

4,178 

'932 

1,071 

366 

705 

687 



1,063 

(NA) 

507 

(NA) 

322 

2,262 
2,161 

'101 

2,057 
3240 

(NA) 



37,326 

32,724 

4,602 



835 
33 

36,458 
31,856 
4,602 
4,516 
1,630 
2,886 
2,940 



9,530 
(NA) 

4,201 
(NA) 

2,179 

18,030 

16,933 

1,097 

16,486 
(NA) 

(NA) 



NA Not available. 
Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments . 

=For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machin- 
ery installed . 

'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the number of production and development 
workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same figures are 
included for production and development workers and for all employees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes the estimated 
value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment at such operations. 

*Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 



8-6 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries; 1958 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 





Industry group and industry. 


Selected expenses ($1,000) 


Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 


Net shipments of primary products-"- 


Ind. 
code 


Total 


Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for j:e-_ 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 


Miner- 
jals_j:ie-_ 
eeived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 


—Con- 
tract 
work 


Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 


Total 


De- 
velop- 
ment 
^and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 


Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
strue - 
ticm, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 


By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 


By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 




Quan-tity 

(1,000 
short 
■tons) 


Value 
($1,000) 


Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 


Value 
($1,000) 


14 
1421 

1441 

145 
1455 


All mineral industries 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Crushed and broken stone 

Crushed and broken granite . . . 
Crushed and broken stone, nee 

Sand and gravel 

Clay and related minerals 

Kaolin and ball clay 


30,549 

29,593 

11, 784 

5,663 

4,122 

1,844 

14,190 
11,201 


21, 546 

^21,916 
7,105 
2,802 
3,150 

1,555 

11,308 
38,760 


879 

517 


1,128 

784 

37 

26 

8 

57 

498 
286 


6,996 

6,893 

4,125 

2,835 

964 

232 

2,384 
2,155 


7,825 

7,652 
3,290 
1,792 
1,157 

362 

3,639 
3,083 


356 

265 
3 

34 

193 

191 


7,469 

7,387 
3,287 
1,792 
1,157 

328 

3,446 
2,892 


xxx 

XXX 

■^12,453 
8,399 
2,267 

4,917 

xxx 

1,678 


xxx 

xxx 

25,042 

12,880 

7,886 

*5,153 

xxx 

28,743 


xxx 

xxx 

(') 

46 

17 

189 
xxx 


xxx 

xxx 

76 

81 

419 

(') 
xxx 



■"-Represents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

■'Cost of minerals received for preparation is included with cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

"•Figures for primary products shipped in other industries are included with those for primary products shipped in the specified industry. For 
crushed and broken stone includes stone produced and used in the same manufacturing establishment in making manufactured products. 



GEORGIA 



8-7 



Tabic 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



14 



l-iZl 



14A1 



U5 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All industries: 

Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000 

Nonmetallic minerals mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1 , 000 

Crushed and broken stone: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000 

Crushed and broken granite: 
Number of establishments ... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1, 000 

Crushed and broken stone, nee; 
Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000, 

Clay and related minerals: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Kaolin and ball clay: 

Number of establishments.... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
m in ing $1,000. 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



170 
5,186 

51,908 



1-43 
*5,093 

^51,162 



31 
1,424 

17,898 



18 
778 

9,009 



453 

6,454 



42 
463 

3,776 



29 
2,672 

26,149 



18 
2,157 

20,963 



Producing establishments 



Total 



165 
5,181 

52,139 



140 
5,089 

51,257 



31 
1,424 

17,898 



18 
778 

9,009 



6 
453 

6,454 



42 
463 

3,776 



28 
(D) 

(D) 



18 
2,157 

20,963 



_L 



Mining only 



Total 



70 
(D) 

(D) 



56 
412 

3,162 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



390 



7 
(D) 

(D) 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



7 
(D) 

(D) 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



56 
372 

2,908 



47 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



186 



7 
(D) 

(D) 



714 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods ^ 



204 



204 



204 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



94 
4,74b 

48,778 



84 
4,677 

48,095 



30 
(D) 

(D) 



18 
778 

9,009 



6 

453 

6,454 



25 
410 

3,386 



21 
2,631 

24,919 



14 
2,139 

20,249 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



4 
285 

3,681 



4 
285 

3,681 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



82 
4,371 

44,368 



72 
4,308 

43,685 



28 
1,144 

14,204 



18 
778 

9,009 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



17 
326 

2,657 



21 
2,631 

24,919 



14 
2,139 

20,249 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



84 
729 



729 



84 
729 



Sepa- 


Nonpro 


rately 


duoing 


oper- 


estab- 


ated 


lish- 


prepa- 


ments 


ration 




plants 





1 

(D) 
(D) 



(') 



3 

4 



(D) 
(D) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. ""^Revised. 
Includes data for 4 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
Includes data for 2 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 

Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded cacital 
expenditiires . 

Includes data for mining services operations. 



8-8 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 

or more 

enfiloy- 

ees 



All employees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
purchased 
machinery 
installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



1954^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
nuniber 



Value 

added 

In 

mining 

($1,000) 



14 
W 

14 

14 



149 
14 
14 
141 



12 

145 
145 



GEORGIA: 

All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures.. 

COUNTIES 

Baldwin (including operations 
in man\if actures ) , 

Bartow. 

Bibb (mineral industries only) 

De Kalb (mineral industries 
only) 

Dougherty 

Elbert, total 

Mineral Industries. . .', 

Included in manufactures.,.. 

Fulton (including operatlqns 
in manufactures ) 

Hart 

Murray 

Muscogee 

Oglethorpe 

Polk (mineral industries only) 

Richmond (including operations 
in manufactures ) 

Stewart 

Walier (Bituminous coal mining 
only) 

Washington 

Wilkinson 



202 

173 

29 



6,182 

5 201 

*98l 



*12 
218 
245 

324 

50 

353 
102 
251 

■^90 
18 
90 
85 
74 
99 

*168 
19 

14 
404 
817 



22,737 
19, 575 
■^3,162 



^42 
908 
699 

1,281 

135 

1,141 
259 
882 

■^419 
54 
202 
265 
203 
332 

*611 
84 

35 
1,547 
3,411 



5,393 

4 500 

*893 



*11 
189 
219 

282 

47 

318 

96 

222 

17 
77 
73 
69 
84 

■^161 
17 

13 
361 
664 



11,378 
9,669 
1,709 



21 
423 
414 

572 

40 

562 
166 
396 

211 
33 
159 
143 
116 
154 

380 
21 

19 

775 

1,365 



18,273 

15,591 

2,682 



34 

704 
622 

999 

123 

931 
245 
686 

370 
41 
165 
217 
185 
258 

580 
73 

34 
1,323 
2,450 



58,048 

52,022 

6,026 



290 
3,118 
1,837 

3,198 

263 

1,758 

543 

1,215 

1,960 
141 
276 
430 
319 
789 

1,921 
423 

48 
4,019 
9,477 



^32,630 
30, 549 
^2,081 



338 
2,277 
1,216 

(D) 

101 

1,046 
289 
757 

(D) 
(D) 
175 
809 
(D) 
374 

^1,720 
304 

7 
2,204 
3,771 



■'82,545 
74,746 
■^7,799 



*328 
5,160 
2,117 

4,307 
294 

2,653 

754 
1,899 

'^2,215 
217 
413 
979 
451 
1,055 



*2,889 
670 

53 

5,181 

12,374 



'8,133 

7,825 

'308 



(NA) 
235 
936 

(D) 

70 

151 
78 
73 

(D) 
(D) 
38 
260 
(D) 
108 

'752 
57 

2 

1,042 

874 



5,286 

4 354 

^932 



(NA) 
248 

10 

'414 

■^20 

321 
187 
134 

*43 

(M) 

97 

96 

8 62 
61 

*170 
(NA) 

9 
383 
859 



37,326 

32,724 

4,602 



(NA) 

2,328 

102 

*3,035 

■^83 

1,569 

1,040 

529 

311 
(NA) 

384 

738 
«246 

364 

1,488 
(NA) 

33 
2,353 
6,605 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

MA Not available. 

■"■Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Gonpanies operating oil and gas field properties were permitted to make only one report for all oil and gas field operations in each State. 
Confianies engaged only in performing oil and gas field or o^ther mining services were permitted to make only one report for all States; these reports 
were classified on the basis of the principal State in viiich the service was performed. For 1958, such reports contained employment on March 15 and 
selected other data by State and county. For such operations, "the State total figures shown for number of establishments represent ■the number of 
reports received which were classified in the State and those shown for number of establishments in a county represent the number of reports •that 
Indicated any operations in ■the specified county. All county statistics shown which were not reported separately were obtained by allocating the 
totals reported for each company on the basis of the reported county data. 

■'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes ■the cost of purchased 
machinery installed. 

*See table 2A, footnote 3. 

'Excludes figxires for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations In manufacturing establishments. 

'includes data for mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

''Represents the Sand and Gravel Industry only. 

"Represents mineral industries only. 



GEORGIA 



8-9 



Tabic 4.— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 19 58 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Gold and sil\fer ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

lOS Metal mining services 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 

120 Bituminous coal 



12C Coal mining services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

141 Dimension stone 

141H DlmenslcQ stone in manufactures 

142 Crushed and broken stone 

142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 
144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel in manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerala 

145M Clay and related minerala in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonmetallic minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c., in 

manufactures 







(Counties 


md E 


ize 


classes 


tn whlo^ 


no 


mineral operations were 


reported 


are 


omitted) 


















All mineral tjperations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied tn 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 


In- 
cluded 

tn 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108' 


109 


120 


120^ 


131 1 


132 


138^ 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148' 


149 


149 
M 


Georgia, total 

No employees 


202 
14 
60 
28 

30 
42 
15 

7 

^6 

3 

1 

5 
3 

6 
3 

1 

2 

1 

1 

2 

3 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

2 

2 

1 

1 

5 
3 
2 


173 
14 
53 
22 

26 
33 
13 

7 

"^5 

1 

1 

5 
3 

3 
3 

1 

2 

1 

1 

2 

3 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

2 

2 
1 

1 

5 
1 
2 


29 

7 
6 

4 
9 
2 


10 
2 
4 


... 


... 


... 


9 

3 

5 


1 
1 


1 
1 


... 


5 

4 
1 


... 


2 

1 
1 


... 


... 


23 


11 


31 


4 


42 

2 

20 

10 

3 
5 

1 
1 


1 
1 


29 

1 
4 
1 

4 
9 
3 
2 

^5 

1 


13 

4 
6 

3 
2 


4 
2 

1 

1 


2 

1 
1 


14 
4 
4 
2 

3 

1 


... 


1-4 employees 

5-9 employees 

10-19 employees . . . 
20-49 employees... 
50-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 

250-499 employees. 


... 


... 


7 
7 

5 
3 

1 


8 
2 


6 

15 

6 

4 


2 

1 
1 


... 


4 


... 




... 


1 


... 


... 


... 


... 














































1 
2 






























1 




COUNTIES 

Baldwin: 

0-19 employees .... 

Barrow: 

20-99 employees . . . 

Bartow: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 

Bibb: 

0-19 employees .... 






























































1 




















































2 
2 




... 


















3 
2 




::: 


2 




3 


































20-99 employees. .. 
100-249 employees. 

Brooks : 

0-19 employees 

Bryan: 

0-19 employees .... 

Camden: 

0-19 employees .... 

Chatham: 

0-19 employees .... 

Cherokee: 

0-19 employees .... 

Clayton: 

20-99 employees . . . 

Cobb: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Colquitt: 

0-19 enployees . 

Columbia: 

0-19 employees .... 

Crawford : 

20-99 employees . . . 

Dade: 

0-19 employees .... 

Decatur: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees... 
250 employees 
































1 








































1 








... 








































2 
































1 
1 




































































































1 




1 








3 










































































1 




















































1 
















































1 




















































1 
















1 








































1 






... 






































1 
1 








































1 




















































1 
1 

1 


... 






... 
























































































De Kalb: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 






























4 


2 


1 
1 




1 






2 


































































1 

































































'See table 3, footnote 2 



Revised . 



8-10 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries''" 



In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



10^ 



105 



106 



108^ 



109 



120 



120^ 



131 '• 



132 



138^ 



Wl 



\i,2 



144 



U5 



147 



14S^ 



149 



149 

M 



COUNTIES— Continued 

Dougherty: 

0-19 employees .... 5 
20-99 employees ... 1 

Douglas : 

0-19 employees . . . 

Effingham: 

20-99 employees . . 

Elbert: 

0-19 employees ... 
20-99 employees . . 

Fayette : 

20-99 employees.. 

Floyd : 

0-19 employees . ... 
20-99 employees . . , 

Franklin: 

0-19 employees . . . , 

Fulton: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . , 

Gilmer: 

100-249 employees, 

Glynn: 

0-19 employees .... 

Gordon: 

0-19 employees .... 

Grady: 

20-99 employees . . , 

Gwinnett: 

20-99 employees . . . 

Hall: 

20-99 employees . . , 

Hancock: 

20-99 employees . . , 

Hart: 

0-19 employees 

Henry: 

20-99 employees . . . 

Houston: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Jasper: 

20-99 employees . . . 

Jefferson: 

20-99 employees . . . 

Jones : 

20-99 employees . . . 

Liberty: 

0-19 employees 

Long: 

0-19 employees .... 

Lowndes : 

0-19 employees .... 

Lumpkin: 

0-19 employees .... 

Mcintosh: 

0-19 employees .... 

Macon: 

0-19 employees .... 

Madison: 

20-99 employees . . 

■■■See table 3, footnote 2 



1 


1 


1 


1 


10 


10 


8 


1 


1 


1 


4 


4 


1 


1 


1 


1 


6 


4 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


... 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


3 


1 


1 


2 




2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


2 


1 


1 


1 


1 


3 


3 


1 


1 



GEORGIA 



8-11 



Tabic 4— Distribution of Mi 



ncral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 
for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries ^ 



In- 
cluded 

In 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



10^ 



105 



106 



108 



109 



120 



120^ 



131 1 



132 



138^ 



Ul 



1^2 



144 



145 



147 



148' 



149 
M 



COUNTIES — Continued 

Mitchell: 

0-19 employees.. 

Montgomery: 

0-19 employees . . 

Murray: 

0-19 employees . . 
20-99 employees. 

Muscogee: 

0-19 employees . . 
20-99 employees. 

Oconee : 

0-19 employees . . 

Oglethorpe: 

0-19 employees . . 
20-99 employees. 

Pickens: 

0-19 employees . . 
20-99 employees. 
100-249 employees 
250 employees 
and over 

Poli: 

0-19 employees . . 
20-99 employees, 

Rabun: 

0-19 employees . . 

Richmond : 

0-19 employees . , 
20-99 employees, 

Rockdale : 

20-99 employees, 

Screven: 

0-19 employees . , 

Stewart : 

0-19 employees . , 

Sumter: 

0-19 employees . , 

Talbot: 

0-19 employees . , 

Taylor: 

0-19 employees., 

Thomas: 

0-19 employees . , 
20-99 employees, 

Tift: 

0-19 employees . . 

Twiggs: 

20-99 employees , 
250 employees 
and over 

Union: 

0-19 employees . , 

Upson: 

0-19 employees . , 

Walker: 

0-19 employees. , 

Ware: 

0-19 employees . , 

Warren: 

100-249 employees 

Washington: 

0-19 employees . . . 
20-99 employees . . 
100-249 employees 



^See table 3, footnote 2 



8-12 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4.-Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries 1 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


lOi 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


12C^ 


131^ 


132 


138^ 


Ul 


Ul 
M 


\U2 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


1481 


149 


149 

M 


COUNTIES— Continued 

Wayne: 

0-19 employees .... 

Webster: 

0-19 employees .... 

Wheeler: 

0-19 employees. . . . 

Whitfield: 

0-19 employees. ... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Wilkinson: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 
250 employees 


1 
2 

1 

1 
1 

3 

1 

2 


1 
2 

1 

1 

3 

1 

2 




























1 


























... 


2 
















































































1 
















1 








































1 


























































































3 

1 

2 


... 


... 


... 


... 





































































































































\ 



^See table 3, footnote 2 



IDAHO 

9-1 



A 



< 



9-2 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES— AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining by County.- 1958 



IDAHO 



RANK AMONG STATES 
EMPLOYMENT - 29 
VALUE OF SHIPMENTS -32 




YELLOWSTONE 
iNATlONAL PARK 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



MINING IN IDAHO 

Employment For Industry Group By County: 1958 



9-i 




IX 1,000 2.500 5,000 7,500 10,000 

Number of Employees 



Employment in Mining 

Including Mining in Manufactures:i902-1958 
IDAHO 









□oa COAL MINING, OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION. 


1 












I«XX>«X1 AND NONMETALLIC MINERALS MINING 1 








5 


"^ 


^ 


V7 








Hm METAL MINING 1 










4 






















- 





- -- 


















2 

1 
n 


















- 






- 


--- 


- 


- 


- - 



1902 1909 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



1919 



1929 

CENSUS YEAR 



/95« 1958 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



9-4 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 1.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations; 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of column captlcais see Introduction. For more detailed historical statistics for this State, see table 1 of the corresponding 
chapter of the 1954 Census of Mineral Industries, Vol. II. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 





Establish- 
ments, 
number 




1 »-..»nn 


Production 


and 


Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 


Selected expenses ($1,000) 


Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts '^ 

($1,000) 


Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 

($1,000) 


Energy 


used 






development workers 


Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 


Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 


Con- 
tract 
work 


Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
In- 
atalJfid 


equivalent) 


Kind of operation 
and year 


To- 
tal 


20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 


Number 


Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 


Number 


Man- 
hours 

a,ooo) 


Wages 
($1,000) 


Total 

(mil- 
lion) 


Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 


Mineral industries 
only: 

1958 

1954 

Including operations 
in manufactures: 

1958 

1954' 

1939 

1929 

1919'' 

1909'' 

1902'' 


170 
249 

183 
257 

^116 
153 
132 
890 

^617 


22 
28 

22 
28 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


3,932 
4,767 

3,979 
4,781 
5,049 
5,114 
3,123 
4,599 
4,949 


20,836 
22,358 

21,085 
22,405 
8,146 
9,055 
5,385 
5,889 
5,542 


3,305 
4,121 

3,352 
4,135 
4,654 
4,777 
2,828 
4,324 
'4,415 


6,344 
8,622 

6,436 
8,651 
9,753 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


16,366 
18,664 

16,565 

18,711 
7,086 
8,254 
4,735 
5,348 
4,801 


36,815 
^^38,558 

38,427 

^=38,757 

18,952 

15,593 

8,654 

5,533 

5,982 


11,392 
11,477 

^11,538 
3 11, 498 
4,335 
4,847 
2,970 
2,796 
2,031 


2,147 
2,672 

■^2,147 
■^2,672 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 


3,4^6 
1,787 

^3,446 
^1,787 
102 
306 
216 
320 
202 


1,195 
3,254 

*1,195 
*3,256 

(NA) 
1,014 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


52,084 
^51,883 

53,842 

2 52, 083 

23,389 

20,746 

11,840 

8,649 

8,215 


2,911 
5,820 

*2,911 
■*5,822 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


527 
^*58o 

*527 
233 
300 
8181 
(NA) 
(NA) 


^175 
128 

^73 

127 

50 

63 

64 

(NA) 

(MA) 



NA Not available. Revised. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of min- 
erals produced and used in the same establishment. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of shipments (or production for 1919 and 
1909) and contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to amother for preparation. The approximate magni- 
tude of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of "Minerals received for preparation. " For all other years the figures represent 
net production (or net shipments for copper, lead, zinc, gold, and silver ores) and exclude this duplication. 

^Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. No data were obtained for 1954 on the value of shipments and cost of ores received 
for milling by this industry. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations (and for 1958, dimension stone quarries) in manufacturing establishments, 
the cost of contract work is included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

^Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments, if any. 

^Represents number of mines and quarries and, for mining services Industries, number of operating companies. 

''Excludes data for sand and gravel operations, and, for 1919 and 1909, any stone quarries in cement and lime establishments. Only one sand and 
gravel operation was reported for 1929, and no such stone quarries. 

^Excludes purchased electricity. For 1929, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to 40 percent of the total kwh equivalent of energy used. 

'Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 



IDAHO 



y-3 



Table 2A— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Industry group and industry 



Total 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Pay- 
roll 



fl,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



pl,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



10 

1031 

104 

law 

109 



12 
13 

lA 

1421 



1441 
147 

1475 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures... 



Metal mining 

Lead and zinc ores 

Gold and silver ores 

Silver ores 

Miscellaneous metal ores. 



Bituminous coal mining. Oil and 
gas extraction, and Nonmetallic 
minerals mining 



} 



Mineral industries. 



Included in manufactures. 
Crushed and broken stone 
(mineral industry only) . . . 

Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures. 
Chemical and fertilizer 
minerals : 
Phosphate rock 



183 

170 

13 

111 
42 
44 

14 
10 



16 



3,979 
3,932 

'47 

3,372 

1,946 

907 

878 

81 



607 

560 

^47 

85 
212 
178 
^34 



21,085 

20,886 

^199 



18,225 

10,243 

5,182 

5,094 

415 



2,860 
2,661 

^199 

411 

854 

705 

^149 

1,036 



3,352 

3,305 

347 

2,840 

1,578 

819 

793 

56 



512 

465 

347 

77 
192 

158 
^34 



6,436 

6,344 

92 

5,517 
2,846 
1,679 
1,634 

124 



919 

827 

92 

124 
348 
280 



16,565 

16,366 

199 

14,323 

7,384 

4,608 

4,529 

276 



2,242 

2,043 

199 

364 
780 
631 

149 



38,427 

36,815 

1,612 

30,255 

11,701 

9,606 

9,588 

727 



8,172 

6,560 

1,612 

705 
3,102 
1,760 
1,342 

2,799 



=18,326 

18,180 

^146 

14,104 

6,785 

3,203 

3,032 

462 



■^4,222 

4,076 

^146 

536 

^1,079 

954 

^125 

2,120 



353, 842 
52,084 
^1,758 

41,779 
17,638 
11,975 
11,915 
925 



^12,063 
10,305 
^1,758 

1,135 
34, 064 

2,597 
^1,467 

4,856 



42,911 
2,911 

(MA) 

2,580 
848 
834 
705 
264 



■^331 

331 

(NA) 

106 
(NA) 

117 
(NA) 



4,781 
4,767 

^14 

4,190 
2,522 
1,129 

1,060 
(NA) 



591 
577 

3l4 

(NA) 

(NA) 

195 

(NA) 

(NA) 



^'38,737 
^'38,558 

179 

=32,446 

18,162 

9,186 

8,816 

(NA) 



6,246 

6,067 

179 



(NA) 

(NA) 

1,868 

(NA) 



(NA) 



MA Not available. '^Revised. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments, if any, 

=For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machinery 
installed . 

■'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the number of production and development 
workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same figures are 
included for production and development workers and for all employees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes the estimated 
value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment. 

^Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufactiiring establishments. 

'Excludes data for the Uranium-Radium-Vanadium Ores Industry. No data were obtained for 1954 on the value of shipments and cost of ores received 
for milling by this industry. 



9-6 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries; 1958 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group and industry 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 



Total 



Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
Cor re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 
and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



Total 



De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 



Net shipments of primary products-' 



By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



I 



10 

1031 

104 
1044 

12 

13 
14 
147 

1475 



All mineral industries. 

Metal mining 

Lead and zinc ores 



Gold and silver ores. 
Silver ores 



") Bituminous coal mining. Oil and 
> gas extraction, and Nonmetalllc 

J minerals mining 

Chemical & fertilizer minerals: 
Phosphate rook 



18,180 

14,104 

6,785 

3,203 
3,032 

4,076 
2,120 



11,392 

9,221 

^6,510 

2,751 
2,673 

2,171 
854 



2,147 
2,147 



3,446 

1,865 

77 

143 
102 

1,581 
1,225 



1,195 

871 

198 

309 
257 

324 
41 



2,911 

2,580 

848 

834 
705 

331 
63 



1,358 

1,300 

587 

328 
304 

58 

44 



1,553 

1,280 

261 

506 
401 

273 
19 



'■873 



XXX 

■^440 



XXX 

^1,250 



XXX 

^15,607 

XXX 

^11,681 



XXX 

(NA) 



XXX 
XXX 

(NA) 

XXX 

(NA) 

XXX 

(NA) 



XXX 
XXX 

(') 

XXX 



(NA) 



NA Not available. 

■"■Represents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

^Figures for cost of minerals received for preparation are included with those for cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and 
electricity. 

^Represents crude ore mined, hence, is not directly comparable with the value of net shipments of ores and concentrates shown in the succeeding 
column. 

'Figures for primary products shipped in other industries are included with those for primary products shipped in the specified industry. 

^Represents thousands of long tons. 



IDAHO 



9-7 



Tabic 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for industry Groups and Selected Industries: 195H 

(Kor expiimntloii of lliie iiiul column c/ipllon:: -see Lnlroriuc tlon) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing ostHblisliments 



Mlnlnn only 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
lULiies 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods ' 



Mlnou with preparation plant:; 



Under- 
ground 
mines 



0()en- 

plt 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



oepti- 


Nonpro 


rately 


duclng 


oper- 


estab- 


ated 


lish- 


prepa- 


ments 


ration 
plants 





10 



1031 



lOi 



104^ 



12 
13 
14 



1475 



I 



A.i industries: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Metal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Lead and zinc ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Gold and silver ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Silver ores: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Bituminous coal. Oil and gas ex- 
traction, and Nonmetallic 
minerals mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Phosphate rock: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 



166 
^3,932 

^36,815 



111 
^3,372 

'30,255 



42 
1,946 

11,701 



44 
907 

9,606 



14 
878 

9,588 



55 
'560 

'6,560 



4 
181 



113 
'3,789 

'37,026 



63 
'3,251 

'30,388 



26 
1,921 

11,794 



24 
840 

9,707 



9 
836 

9,661 



50 
'538 

^6,638 



4 

181 



44 
(D) 

(D) 



27 
(D) 

(D) 



12 
129 



1,793 



104 



17 
(D) 

(D) 



15 
136 

1,814 



15 
136 

1,814 



9 
129 



1,775 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



583 



217 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 

(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



2,799 2,799 



68 
3,478 

32,329 



35 
(D) 

(D) 



14 
1,792 

10,001 



15 
832 



9,594 



4 
828 

9,557 



33 

(D) 

(D) 



4 

181 

2,799 



20 
2,639 

19,662 



20 
2,639 

19,662 



14 
1,792 

10,001 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



45 
452 

6,682 



13 
91 

2,002 



32 

361 

4,680 



4 

181 

2,799 



3 
387 

5,985 



2 

(D) 



(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



53 
143 

(*) 



48 
121 



16 
25 



20 
67 



5 
42 



5 
22 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

^Includes data for 4 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
^Includes data for one sand and gravel establishment for which the method of mining was not specified. 
^Includes data for service establishments, in part, classified in other States. 

*Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded capital 
expenditures. 



9-8 



Ind. 
code 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 
Table 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 
or more 
employ- 
ees 



All employees 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
purchased 
machinery 
installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts^ 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



195^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added 

In 

mining 

($1,000) 



14 



10 

103 

104 



IDAHO: 

All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures.. 

COUNTIES 

Ada (mineral industries only). 

Bannock (mineral Industries 
only) 

Blaine 

Bonneville (mineral industries 
only) 

Idaho (mineral industries 
only) 

Shoshone 

Lead and zinc ores 

Gold and silver ores 



183 

170 

13 



3,979 

3,932 

347 



27 

17 
20 

19 

34 

2,501 

1,649 

833 



21,085 

20 886 

^199 



120 

72 
89 

95 

174 

13,800 
8,876 
4,821 



3,352 

3,305 

347 



22 

15 
18 

18 

20 

2,073 

1,314 

754 



6,436 

6,344 

92 



42 

25 
36 

35 

40 

3,916 
2,361 
1,545 



16,565 

16,366 

199 



107 

56 
75 

92 

85 

10,515 
6,188 
4,305 



38,427 

36,815 

1,612 



121 

137 
201 

391 

157 

19,267 

10,019 

9,224 



2 18, 326 

18 180 

^146 



214 

60 
92 

179 

121 

8,458 
5,960 
2,457 



353,842 
52,084 
^1,758 



309 

184 
139 

526 

240 

26,898 
15,320 
11,516 



^2,911 

2,911 

(NA) 



26 

13 
154 



44 



38 

827 
659 
165 



4,781 
4,767 

(NA) 

21 
(NA) 

29 

39 

2,917 

1,829 

953 



38,737 
=^=38,558 
*179 



(NA) 

199 
(NA) 

276 

345 

23,015 

14,307 

8,673 



NA Not available. Revised. 

■"■Companies operating oil and gas field properties were required to make only one report for all oil and gas field operations in each State. Com- 
panies engaged only in performing oil and gas field and other mining services were required to make only one report for all States; these reports 
were classified on the basis of the principal State In which the service was performed. For 1958, such reports contained employment on March 15 and 
receipts for services by State and county. For such operations, the State total figures shown for number of establishments represent the number of 
reports received which were classified in the State and those shown for number of establishments in a county represent the number of reports that 
Indicated any operations in the specified county. All county statistics shown for such operations which were not reported separately were obtained 
by allocating the totals reported for each company on the basis of the reported county data. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machin- 
ery installed. 

^See table 2A, footnote 3. 

■^Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for the Uranium-Radi^um-Vanadl^um Ores Industry. 

^Excludes data for sand mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 



IDAHO 



9-9 



Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Cold and silver ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 Metal mining services 

109 Miscellaneous netal ores 
120 Bituminous coal 



12C Coal mining services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

I'tl Dimension stone 

KIN Dimension stone in manufactures 

142 Crushed and broken stone 

142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 

144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel in manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonmetalllc minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c., in 

manufactures 



(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied In 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 



In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



104 



105 



106 



108^ 109 



120 



12C- 



131^ 



132 



138' 



141 



142 



144 



145 



147 



148^ 



149 



149 
M 



Idaho, total 

No employees . . 
1-4 employees. 
5-9 employees. 



10-19 employees 
20-49 employees 
50-99 employees 
100-249 employees 

250-499 employees 
500-999 employees 

COUNTIES 



Ada: 

0-19 employees . . . . 

Adams: 

0-19 employees . . . . 

Bannock: 

0-19 employees. . . . 

Bear Laie: 

0-19 employees . . . . 

Benewah: 

0-19 employees 

Bingham: 

0-19 employees . . 
20-99 employees . 

Blaine: 

0-19 employees . . 

Boise: 

0-19 employees.. 

Bonner : 

0-lV employees . . 

Bonneville: 

0-19 employees . . , 

Boundary: 

0-19 employees . . , 

Butte : 

0-19 employees . . , 

Canyon: 

0-19 employees . . , 

Caribou: 

0-19 eirployees . . 
20-99 enjloyees . . 

Cassia: 

0-19 employees . . . 

Clearwater : 

0-19 employees... 

Custer : 

0-19 employees . . . 
20-99 employees . . 

Elmore : 

0-19 employees . . . 

Franklin: 

0-19 employees . . . 

Gem: 

0-19 employees . . , 



133 
39 
89 
20 

13 

9 



170 
39 
79 
18 

12 
9 

7 



13 



10 



25 



^See table 3, footnote 1. 



9-10 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 







(Counties and size 


classes 


in which 


no 


mineral operations were 


reported 


are 


oml 


tted) 


















All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


state, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries 1 


In- 
cluded 

In 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


1081 


109 


120 


120^ 


1311 


132 


1381 


Ul 


Wl 
M 


1A2 


142 

M 


144 


144 

M 


J.45 


145 
M 


147 


14^1 


149 


149 
M 


COUNTIES— Continued 

Gooding: 

0-19 employees 

Idaho: 

0-19 employees 

Jerome: 

0-19 employees 

Kootenai : 

0-19 employees 

Latah: 

0-19 employees .... 

Lemhi: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 
250 emjiloyees 
and over 


1 

13 

3 

5 

2 

10 
1 

1 
1 
1 
1 
2 

2 

1 

1 
1 

1 

29 

7 
1 

3 
1 

2 

2 

5 

1 

2 


1 

12 

3 

2 

10 
1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 

1 
1 

1 

1 

1 

29 

7 
1 

3 
1 

2 

4 
2 

I 

2 




















1 


















1 

1 
1 
















1 


... 


... 


... 


8 




















4 




1 






















1 




1 


















1 




2 


1 




















1 


































1 












1 








3 


3 






1 


1 


3 




































































1 
































Lewis: 

0-19 employees 

Lincoln: 

0-19 employees 

Madison: 

0-19 employees 

Minidoka: 

0-19 employees 

Nez Perce: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 

Owyhee: 

0-19 employees.... 

Payette: 

0-19 employees .... 

Power : 

0-19 employees. . . . 

Shoshone : 

0-19 employees. . . . 
20-99 employees . . . 
100-2^9 employees. 
250 employees 
























1 
















































1 
1 
1 






























































1 
1 
































1 
1 








































1 
1 






























































1 


































































1 
1 


































































1 


19 
5 


6 
2 

1 

1 






1 










































































































2 








































Teton: 

0-19 employees .... 
250 employees 














































1 










































Twin Falls: 

0-19 employees .... 

Valley: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 

Washington: 

0-19 employees. . . . 
20-99 employees... 

Undistributed: 

n-T9 pinpl nypp"; 


























2 
























2 




1 
1 




1 

1 

2 






































































2 




































1 






























^ 




































2 








































. 


_ 





























iSee table 3, footnote 1. 



ILLINOIS 

10-1 



10-2 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES- -AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining by County:1958 



ILLINOIS 



RANK AMONG STATES 
EMPLOYMENT -8 
VALUE OF SHIPMENTS -8 



•"^ MINERAL INDUSTRIES 



Q INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES / 



EMPLOYMENT 

8000- 12000 ~->^ 

4000- 7999 . 

2000- 3999 — > 
1000- 1999 — . 

500- 999 ^ 

200 - 499 — 

25- 199 — ' 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COA/U>AERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 




MINING IN ILLINOIS 

Employment For Industry Group By County. 1958 



10-3 



Metal Mining 




Oil and Gas Extraction 




General Extent of Oil and Gas FieWs 



Coal Mining 




General Extent o( Coal Fields 



Nonmetallic Minerals Mining 





U. S. C}€J>ARTM£NT OF COMMERCE 



100 1000 ?wo sooo ?wo 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



10-4 MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 

Employment in Mining 

Including Mining in Manufactures:i902-1958 
ILLINOIS 



100 



80 



to 
i 60 



40 



20 



1902 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



1909 



LEGEND 

OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION (Not available for 1929, 
*IN 1902 ONLY 1 EMPLOYEE 

METAL MINING AND NONMETALLIC MINERALS MURING 

COAL MINING 




1919 1929 1939 

CENSUS YEAR 



1954 1958 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



ILLINOIS 



10- -5 



Tabic 1. -General Statistics for Mineral Operations; 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of coluim captions see Introduction. For more detailed historical statlstlca for this dtate, see table 1 of the corresponding 
chapter of the 1954 Census of Mineral Industries, Vol. II. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 



Kind of operation 
and year 



Establish- 
ments, 
number 



To- 
tal 



20 
or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All employees 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration^ 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
in- 
stalled 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts^ 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



Energy used 

(kwh 
equivalent) 



Total 

(mil- 
lion) 



Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 



Mineral industries 
only: 

1958 

1954 



Including operations 
in manufactures: 
All operations: 

1958 

1954' 

1939* 

1919^ 

1909^ 

1902^° 

Excluding oil and 
gas extraction 
industries : 

1958 

1954' 

1939^3 

1929' 

1919* 

1909* 

1902^° 



1,323 
1,345 



1,375 
1,384 
'1,233 
772 
995 
■^1,107 



576 
615 
'847 
536 
536 
668 
X083 



253 
470 



258 
269 

(HA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



154 
157 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



27,112 
30,157 



27,482 

30,494 
48,887 
83,618 
74,662 
41,859 



18,465 
20,533 
37,436 
56,126 
80,561 
70,577 
41,858 



142,651 
126,847 



14^,359 

128,189 
65,418 

104,303 
49,524 
28,578 



105,481 
88,244 
46,818 
80, 560 

100,283 
46,461 
28,577 



22,848 
26,627 



23,218 
26,964 
44,422 
79,123 
72,131 
1^0,040 



15,608 
18,397 
34, 573 
53,415 
76,371 
68,358 
^^0,039 



43,151 
48,697 



43,891 

49,370 

68,509 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



30,226 
32,858 
50,807 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



113,007 
107,174 



114,715 
108,516 
54,325 
94,179 
46,410 
26,726 



83,837 
75,624 
39,384 
73,818 
90,901 
43,784 
26,725 



452,357 
375,191 



462,230 
378,595 
165,538 
153,649 
64,291 
34,106 



232,858 

188,373 

70,803 

112,497 

124,683 

51,825 

34,104 



98,866 
77,040 



^100,060 

77,986 

23,710 

24,500 

9,823 

3,333 



^77,693 

^45,948 

19,386 

20,178 

22,653 

5,709 

3,333 



81,294 
23,804 



81,294 

23,804 

(NA) 

92 

102 
(NA) 



21,221 
(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 



28,071 
41,728 



'28,071 

'41,728 

22,406 

432 

2,443 

26 



^3,480 

'5,445 

288 

273 

73 

140 

25 



31,155 
38,327 



*31,155 
*38,327 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



,554 
,580 
(NA) 
,240 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



638,774 
492,465 



649,841 
496,815 
211,654 
178,673 
76,659 
37,465 



307,707 
259,635 

90,477 

132,948 

147,409 

57,763 

37,462 



52,969 
63,625 



'52,969 
•63,625 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



■^23,878 
^16,932 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



8,647 
7,909 



'^*8,6W 

^7,909 

8,705 

'16,645 

(NA) 

(NA) 



"*2,o09 

*2,927 

7,057 

9,163 

'16,048 
(NA) 
(NA) 



"578 
297 



572 
293 
196 

210 
(NA) 
(NA) 



^180 
159 
204 
172 
210 
(NA) 
(NA) 



X 



NA Not available. Revised. 

^For years prior to 1958, excludes the cost of natural gas processed at natural gas liquids plants, but for 195''- includes the estimated value prior 
to processing of natural gas liquids contained in such gas. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of minerals 
produced and used in the same establishment. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of shipments (or production for 1919 and 1909) and 
contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for preparation. The approximate magnitude of this 
duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other years, represents net production and excludes 
this duplication. For years prior to 1958, excludes the value of residue gas from natural gas liquids plants. 

'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is included 
with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. For "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries" in 1958, 
see footnote 12. 

"Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'Excludes data for any sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for dimension stone dressing operations, if any, in conjunction with one dimension limestone quarry. 

''Represents number of mines and quarries, number of natural gas liquids plants, and, for the crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services 
industries, number of operating companies. 

^Excludes data for sand, gravel, common clay, and shale mining operations and limestone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime plants. There 
were 137 such mines and quarries in 1939 with products valued at $5,822 thousand. For 1919, excludes data for one nonproductng establisliment. For 
"Excluding oil and gas extraction industries" in 1909, except for number of establishments, includes data for nonproducing crude petroleum and natural 
gas operations. 

'Excludes purchased electricity. For 1939, the quantity of purchased electricity for "All operations" amounted to only 3 percent of the total kwh 
equivalent of energy used; and for 1929 for "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries, " to only 2 percent. 

•"■"Excludes data for sand, gravel, common clay, and shale mining operations and limestone quarries operated as parts of cement plants. Includes data 
for lime plants producing lime valued at $486 thousand. 

•'■■'•Figures for average employment were converted to a 300-day basis for "establishments which operated for a shorter period. 

■'■^Figures for minerals received for preparation are included wi-th those for supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

■'■■'Excludes data for 5 nonproducing mines. See also foo"tnote 6. 



10-6 MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 

Table 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Industry group and industry 



Total 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added tn 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery In- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



1954 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures. 



12 
1211 



13 
1311 



Bituminous coal mining'. 
Bituminous coal 



Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural 



ami ^1 



letal mining and Noometallic 

linerals mining 

Mineral industries' 

Included in manufactures. 



1421 



14i;i 



Crushed and broken stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures. . . 

Crushed and broken limestone 

(mineral subindustry) 



Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures 

Common sand and gravel (mineral 

subindustry) 

Glass sand and Molding sand 

(mineral subindustries) 



145 



1459 



1473 



Clay and related minerals 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures 

Fire clay 

Included in manufactures 

Clay and related minerals, nee. 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures 



1,375 

1,323 

52 

141 
141 

799 
547 



435 

383 

52 

158 

153 

5 

147 

179 
171 



161 

10 

51 
13 
38 
12 

7 
39 

8 
31 



258 

253 

5 

71 
71 

104 
62 



27,AS2 

27,112 
*370 



11,140 
11,139 

9,017 
6,089 



7,325 
6,955 

^370 

2,796 

2,669 

^127 

2,625 

2,439 

2,370 

^69 

2,069 

301 

*306 

*137 

^169 

81 

260 

225 

116 

^109 



144,359 

142,651 

^1,708 

66,595 
66,591 

38,878 
28,181 



38,886 
37,178 
^1,708 

14,563 

13,881 

^682 

13,712 

12,583 

12,306 

^277 

10,714 

1,592 

*1,328 

'594 

^734 

347 

^256 

981 

503 

^478 



Chemical and fertilizer minerals 
(Fluorspar) 



25 



(D) 



(D) 



23,218 

22,848 

^370 

9,871 
9,870 

7,610 
4,977 



5,737 

5,367 

^370 

2,466 

2,339 

^127 



2,298 

2,046 

1,977 

269 

1,744 

233 

293 
129 

^169 

79 

260 

219 

110 

^109 



691 



43,891 

43,151 

740 

18,058 
18,057 

13,665 
9,070 



12,168 

11,428 

740 

5,493 

5,239 

254 

5,148 

4,215 
4,076 

139 

3,596 

480 

628 
291 
337 
151 
120 
477 
260 
217 



1,344 



114,715 

113,007 

1,708 

56,815 
56,812 

30,878 
21,312 



27,022 

25,314 

1,708 

12,070 

11,388 

682 

11,230 

9,941 

9,664 

277 

8,591 

1,073 

1,272 
538 
734 
337 
256 
935 
457 
478 



2,772 



462,230 

452,357 

9,873 

138,898 
138,893 

229,372 
195,517 



93,960 

84,087 

9,873 

45,358 

41,725 

3,633 

41,287 

36,769 

32,745 

4,024 

27,984 

4,761 

3,046 
850 

2,196 
686 
594 

2,360 
758 

1,602 



6,590 



^240,580 

239,386 

^1,194 

60,479 
60,474 

141,853 
60,694 



^38,248 
37,054 
^1,194 



^16,473 

15,990 

U83 

15,835 



^13,842 

13,712 

^130 

11,590 

2,122 

^1,730 

1,155 

^575 

^519 

^301 

^1,211 

937 

^274 



4,012 



■^649, 841 
638,774 
2ll,067 

186,781 
186,772 

342,134 
229,662 



^120,926 
109,859 
^11,067 

^56,329 
52,213 
24,116 

51,674 

246,719 
42,565 
24,154 

36,496 

6,069 

24,060 
1,289 

22,771 

2l,127 
^895 

22,933 
1,057 

2l,876 



9,627 



'52,969 

52,969 

(NA) 

12,596 
12,595 

29,091 
26,549 



'11,282 

11,282 

(NA) 

35, 502 

5,502 

(NA) 

5,448 

^3,892 

3,892 

(NA) 

3,078 

814 

3 716 
716 

(NA) 
378 

(NA) 

^638 
638 

(NA) 



975 



Y 



•30,494 
30,157 
2 *337 

14,956 
14,956 

9,961 
6,428 



*5,577 

5,240 

2 *337 

2,588 
2,588 

2,380 

(NA) 

1,907 

(NA) 

1,829 

78 

187 
• 2i87 

38 

(NA) 

149 

149 



682 



*378,595 

375,191 

■^3,404 

129,161 
129,161 

190,222 
150,753 

^59,212 
55,808 
*3,404 

29,428 
29,428 

27,396 

(NA) 

20,412 

(NA) 

19,975 

437 

1,787 

1,787 

305 

(NA) 

1,482 

1,482 



5,426 



NA Not available. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machinery 
installed. 

2For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the number of production and development 
workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same figures are 
included for production and development workers and for all employees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes the estimated 
value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment. 

'Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes figures for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'Except for number of establishments, includes figures for the Illinois operations of certain service establishments primarily engaged in performing 
mining services in other States. 

'Excludes data for separately reported central offices and related facilities in the Bentonite Industry. Such figures are included in the totals 
shown for the State and for the major group. 



ILLINOIS 



10-7 



Tabic 2B.-Sclcctcd Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 



(For explaiiQtion of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



12 
12H 

13 

1311 

ID and 

U 

1-^21 



14^1 
1473 



Industry group and industry 



All mineral industries. 



Bituminous coal mining. 
Bituminous coal 



Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas 

iMetal mining and Nonmetallic 

I minerals mining 

Crushed and broken stone 

Crushed and broken limestone. 



Sand and gravel 

Common sand and gravel. 
Fluorspar 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Total 



239,386 

60,479 
60,474 

141,853 
60,694 



37,054 
15,990 
15,835 

13,712 

11,590 

4,012 



Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
I'or re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 



98,866 

^46,726 
^46,721 

3 103, 661 
24,973 



27,716 
^13,104 
^13,002 

^10,719 
^9,003 
^3,052 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 



81,294 



,057 
(^) 



Con- 
tract 
work 



28,071 

1,412 
1,412 

24,591 
23,741 



2,068 
381 
379 

992 

882 
527 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



31,155 

12,341 
12,341 

13,601 
11,980 



5,213 
2,505 
2,454 

2,001 
1,705 



Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 



52,969 

12,596 
12,595 

29,091 
26,549 



11,282 
5,502 
5,448 

3,892 

3,078 

975 



De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



13,117 



566 
566 



11,773 
11,064 



778 
198 
197 

90 

90 

391 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 



39,852 

12,030 
12,029 

17,318 
15,485 



10,504 
5,304 
5,251 

3,802 

2,? 
584 



Net shipments of primary products^ 



By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



XXX 

44,309 



XXX 

'75,691 



XXX 

32,379 
32,057 

34,558 

32,290 

150 



Value 



(*1,000) 



XXX 

176,880 



XXX 

'226,730 



XXX 

48,821 
48,347 

«41,550 

^36, 792 

7,675 



By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



XXX 



XXX 

'867 



XXX 

■^2,756 
'2,756 

■^2,098 

'2,499 

(*) 



Value 



($1,000) 



XXX 

3 

XXX 

'2.347 



XXX 

'4,219 
'4,219 



(«) 
5 



^Represents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

•'Figures for minerals received for preparation are included with those for supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

*tess than 500 tons. 

'Represents thousands of barrels of crude petroleum shipped or used only. In addition, 4,614 million cubic feet of gas was shipped by the Crude 
Petroleum and Natural Gas Industry and 4 million cubic feet by other industries. 

'For the Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Industry, represents $226,117 thousand for crude petroleum shipped and $513 thousand for natural gas 
shipped. For other industries, represents crude petroleum shipped; the value of natural gas shipped in these industries was less than $500. 

'includes minerals produced and used in the same establishment in making manufactured products. The value of such minerals was estimated. 

'Figures for the value of primary products shipped in other industries or subindustries are included with those for the value of primary prod- 
ucts shipped in the specified industry. See also footnote 7. 



10-8 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2C.— Number ot Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Mining only 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods ■'■ 



Mines vri. th preparation plants 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 


Nonpro 


rately 


ducing 


oper- 


estab- 


ated 


lish- 


prepa- 


ments 


ration 




plants 





12II 



1311 



1421 



1441 



1473 



All industries: 

Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Bituminous coal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. . .$1,000. 

Crude petroleum and natural gas: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. . .$1,000. 

Crushed and broken stone: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. . .$1,000. 

Sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. . .$1,000. 

Fluorspar: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. . .$1,000. 



1,072 
24,351 



432,732 



141 

11,139 

138,893 



547 

6,089 

195,517 



153 

2,669 

41,725 



171 

2,370 

32,745 



25 

(D) 

6,590 



1,037 
24,280 



432,668 



139 
(D) 
(D) 



523 

6,073 

196,099 



631 
7,278 

208,832 



50 
(D) 
(D) 



523 

6,073 

196,099 



39 
899 



8,340 



31 

744 

7,172 



50 
250 

3,759 



18 

153 

2,639 



542 
6,129 



196,733 



1 

(D) 
(D) 



523 

6,073 

196,099 



393 
16,723 

208,628 



10,186 
128,242 



55 
7,979 

77,605 

46 

6,899 

66,905 



311 
8,401 

127,270 



40 

3,287 

61,337 



27 
343 

3,753 



13 
279 

15,208 



3 

(D) 
(D) 



152 
(D) 
(D) 



171 

2,370 

32,745 



19 

(D) 

6,617 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



32 

109 
1,798 



10 

81 

778 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



5 

66 

673 



19 

54 

889 



5 
15 

105 



13 

55 

909 



148 
(D) 
(D) 



139 

2,261 

30.947 



2 
(D) 
(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



713 
5,645 



146 

2,344 

37,413 



112 

1,918 

27,194 



2 
(D) 
(D) 



3 
(D) 
(D) 



27 
343 

3,753 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



35 
71 



64 



2 
(D) 



24 
16 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



6 
12 
(3) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

■"■Includes data for 11 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
^Includes data for 7 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 

■'Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded capital expendi- 
tures . 



ILLINOIS 
by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954 



J 0-9 



Tabic V— General Statistics 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



County and Industry group 



1958 



Establlshraents, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 

or more 

eiiploy- 

ees 



All enployees 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
Installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



195-;^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 
added 

in 
mining 

($1,000) 



ILLINOIS; 

All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures.. 

COUNTIES 

Adams (mineral industries 
only) 



l-i 



131 



l-i 
lA. 

131 



13 
131 



131 



13 
131 



12 
14 



131 

14 

131 

131 

13 
13 

131 



Alexander. 



Bond (mineral industries only) 

Crude petroleum and natural 

gas 



Boone 

Brown (mineral industries only) 

Calhoun 

Carroll 

Champaign 



Christian 

Crude petroleum and natural 
gas 

Clark, total 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 

Nonmetallic minerals mining. 



Clay. 



Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 



Clinton, total 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 

tuminous coal mining and 
Nonmetallic minerals mining 



\ Bit 
/ No 



Coles 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 



Cook (including operations 
in manufactures) 

Nonmetallic minerals mining: 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures. . 



Crawford 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 



Cumberland 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 



Douglas . 
Edgar. . . 



Edwards (mineral industries 

only) 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 



Effingham 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 



1,375 

1,323 

52 



12 

5 

38 

22 

3 

4 

4 

6 

6 

35 

24 

44 
39 

26 
5 

116 

79 

78 
74 

50 

4 

48 

37 



258 

253 

5 



27,482 
27,112 

•^370 



126 
50 
64 
20 

7 

16 

11 

21 

16 

839 

56 

200 
143 

118 
57 

521 

346 

294 

194 

148 

100 

190 

95 

^1,877 

1,450 
*68 

584 

482 

62 

45 

153 

9 

162 
126 
123 

105 



144,359 

142,651 

'1,708 



523 

176 

246 

92 

37 

53 

20 

71 

69 

4,166 

258 

847 
631 

544 
216 

2,221 

1,594 

1,083 
843 

682 

240 

823 

437 

^13,351 

9,980 
*299 

2,577 

2,220 

265 

207 

1,041 

39 

706 
580 
550 
484 



23,218 

22,848 

*370 



110 

44 

(NA) 

(NA) 

7 

15 

10 

20 

14 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
46 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

96 

(NA) 
(HA) 

764 

696 
*68 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



43,891 

43,151 

740 



234 

92 

(NA) 

(NA) 

14 

26 

15 

35 

26 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(MA) 

(NA) 
91 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

117 

(NA) 

(NA) 

1,512 

1,377 

135 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



114,715 

113,007 

1,708 



477 

146 

(NA) 

(NA) 

37 

51 

19 

69 

62 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
176 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(HA) 

206 

(NA) 

(NA) 

4,121 

3,822 

299 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



462,230 

452,357 

9,873 



1,345 

422 

(NA) 

(NA) 

135 

112 

46 

249 

207 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
393 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

458 

(NA) 

(NA) 

19,839 

18,627 
1,212 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



^240,580 

239,386 

^1,194 



609 

193 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(D) 
50 
14 

114 

(D) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(HA) 
133 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(HA) 
(HA) 

(HA) 

(D) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

^6,413 

6,279 
^134 

(NA) 

(HA) 

(NA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(NA) 

(HA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 
(HA) 



■*649,841 
638,774 
*11,067 



1,827 
585 

2,258 

1,612 
217 
162 
59 
288 
210 
14,484 

2,583 

2,306 
1,843 

1,610 
463 

11,825 

9,062 

13,338 
12,776 

12,254 

562 

2,251 

1,424 

■^23, 850 

22,504 
■^1,346 

10,592 

9,251 

2,135 

2,075 

(D) 

281 

4,366 
3,989 
2,267 
1,927 



^52,969 

52,969 

(HA) 



127 

30 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(D) 

1 

75 

(D) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(HA) 

(NA) 
63 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(NA) 
(HA) 

(HA) 

(D) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

^2,402 

2,402 
(HA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



30,494 

30,157 

*337 



90 
55 

(NA) 
10 

(NA) 

(NA) 

12 

16 

^1,934 

(NA) 

^162 
«101 

101 
'61 

^426 
(HA) 
6339 
'162 

162 

177 

'158 

(HA) 

^1,395 
1,097 

'608 
(NA) 
'64 
63 
'118 
(HA) 

'136 
136 
'44 

(HA) 



378,595 

375,191 

3,404 



642 

525 
(NA) 
(NA) 

122 

(NA) 

(NA) 

70 

134 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(HA) 
(HA) 

(NA) 
''416 

(HA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(HA) 

475 

(HA) 

(HA) 

12,697 

12,133 
'564 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(HA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(HA) 
(HA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



10-10 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 3.-Gencral Statistics by Selected IndustryGroups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954-Continucd 

(For explanation of coluiui captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



County and Industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 
or more 
employ- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
Installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



1954^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



13 
131 



131 

12 

13 

131 

138 



13 
131 



1A7 



13 
131 

138 
131 

144 

131 

142 
14 



COUNTIES— Continued 

Fayette (mineral industries 

only) 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 



Franklin 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 



Fulton (Bituminous coal only). 

Gallatin 

Oil and gas extraction, 
total 

Crude petrolexim and natu- 
ral gas 

Oil and gas field services 



Greene . 



Hamilton 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 



Hardin 

Nonmetallic minerals mining. 
Chemical and fertilizer 
mineral mining 
( Fluorspar) 



Henderson. 

Henry 

Jackson . . . 



Jasper , total 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 

Oil and gas field services 



Jefferson 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 



Kane 

Lake (mineral industries only) 



La Salle, total 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures. 
Sand and gravel (mineral 
Industries only) 



Lawrence 

Crude petroeum and natu- 
ral gas 



Lee (mineral industries only). 

Livingston (mineral industries 
only) 

Crushed and broken stone.... 



Logan. 



McDonough (mineral industries 
only) 



48 
45 

30 

54 

37 

12 

88 

85 

52 
33 

4 

106 

74 

29 
26 

20 
6 
7 
9 

67 

43 
24 

84 

56 

8 

12 

33 
23 

10 

14 



McHenry 

Macon 

See footnotec at end of table. 



397 
385 

228 

1,617 

77 

805 

196 

167 

84 
83 

32 

368 

224 

837 
828 

789 

55 

63 

374 

169 

63 

106 

1,051 

272 

118 

51 

891 

741 

*150 

579 

661 

533 

28 

137 
81 

87 

63 

219 
37 



1,727 
1,691 

1,050 

8,974 

355 

5,017 

761 

677 

387 
290 

109 

1,622 

1,032 

3,668 
3,651 

3,502 
215 
258 

2,222 

660 

290 
370 

6,115 

1,253 

633 

266 

4,667 

3,857 

*810 

3,182 

2,901 

2,455 

105 

617 
509 

400 

216 

1,483 
154 



(HA) 
(MA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

736 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

32 

(NA) 

(NA) 

712 
705 

666 

(NA) 

62 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

108 

41 

(NA) 
(NA) 
*150 

442 

(NA) 

(NA) 

26 

103 
69 

62 

(NA) 

189 

(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

1,388 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

56 

(NA) 

(NA) 

1,338 
1,332 

1,258 

(NA) 

108 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

205 

102 

(NA) 

(NA) 

299 

934 

(NA) 

(NA) 

32 

146 
82 

117 

(NA) 
460 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

4,576 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

109 

(NA) 

(NA) 

2,851 
2,841 

2,692 

(NA) 

2AA 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

558 

239 

(NA) 

(NA) 

810 

2,101 

(NA) 

(NA) 

99 

466 
376 

247 

(NA) 

1,289 

(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

15,709 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

274 

(NA) 

(NA) 

6,693 
6,697 

6,322 

(NA) 

341 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

1,892 

812 

(NA) 

(NA) 

2,942 

3,637 

(NA) 

(NA) 

404 



1,440 
1,049 

652 



(NA) 

4,475 

(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

5,447 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

197 

(NA) 

(NA) 

4,229 
4,160 

3,957 

(NA) 

(D) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

1,195 

335 

(NA) 
(NA) 
^688 

8,324 

(NA) 

(NA) 

232 



490 
388 

(D) 



(NA) 

2,089 

(NA) 



40,315 
40,236 

39,138 

26,712 

5,81'3 

19,506 

9,945 

9,619 

7,783 
1,836 

361 

10,495 

8,285 

9,946 
9,919 

9,387 

1,085 

522 

7,298 

6,522 

5,873 
649 

22,383 

7,718 

2,409 

987 

*15,403 
U,773 
*3,630 

*10,747 

16,427 

15,036 

566 



1,784 
1,317 

865 



679 

6,242 

648 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

1,650 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

110 

(NA) 

(NA) 

976 
938 

892 
(NA) 

(D) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

678 

160 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

1,214 

(NA) 

(NA) 

70 



146 

120 

(D) 



(NA) 
322 

(NA) 



*348 

(NA) 

329 

'2,579 

87 

1,025 

*202 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

34 

*258 

(NA) 

584 
709 

642 

16 

90 

321 

*14S 

148 
(NA) 

*669 

(NA) 

63 

18 

*373 
*178 
*195 

327 

«438 

(NA) 

47 



91 
(NA) 

73 



«34 
121 
635 



ILLINOIS 



10-11 



Table 3 -General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



1958 and 1954-Continued 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 
or more 
employ- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
Installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



195^1 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 



COUNTIES— Continued 

Madison (mineral industries 
only) 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 
(mineral industries and in- 
cluded in manufactures) . . . . 



Marion 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 



Menard (mineral industries 
only) 

Mercer (including operations 
in manufactures ) 



Moultrie. 
Ogle 



Peoria (mineral industries 
only) 

Bituminous coal mining 

Sand and gravel (including 
operations in manufactures) 



Perry. 
Piatt. 
Pike.. 
Pope. . 



Randolph 

Nonmetallic minerals mining. 

Richland , total 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 

Oil and gas field services 



Rock Island. 



St. Clair (mineral industries 
only) 

Crushed and broken stone . . . . 



Saline 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 



Sangamon (mineral industries 
only) 

\ Bituminous coal mining and 
f Nonmetallic minerals mining 



Scott 

Shelby 

Stephenson. 



Tazewell (mineral industries 
only) 



Union 

Vermilion (including opera- 
tions in manufactxires) . . . . 
Bitiminous coal raining... 



Wabash 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 



137 
97 



537 

*202 
503 
409 

32 

2-4 

3 

89 

199 
87 

*74 

584 

2 

58 

17 

416 
112 

597 

443 
154 

80 

1,184 
239 

768 

77 

138 

137 

17 

16 

12 

59 
80 



*241 
193 



480 
318 



2,784 

*1,351 
2,668 
1,884 

90 

107 

10 

381 

1,029 
468 

*379 

(D) 

9 

227 

56 

2,703 
603 

2,578 

2,040 
538 

386 

7,451 
1,169 

4,207 

355 

610 

607 

80 

71 

33 

286 
285 

'*1,460 
1,244 

2,028 

1,465 



(NA) 

*135 
(NA) 
(NA) 

29 

24 

(NA) 

80 

170 
69 

*68 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

14 

(NA) 
108 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
212 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
121 

17 
(NA) 

12 

(NA) 
73 

4223 
179 

(NA) 

(NA) 



(NA) 

236 

(NA) 
(NA) 

46 

46 

(NA) 
199 

350 
121 

144 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

18 

(NA) 
258 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

168 

(NA) 
368 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
203 

32 
(NA) 

18 

(NA) 
94 

407 
330 

(NA) 

(NA) 



(NA) 

635 

(NA) 
(NA) 



90 

(NA) 

330 

874 
391 

326 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

46 

(NA) 
570 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

348 

(NA) 
1,038 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
531 

77 

(NA) 

33 

(NA) 
212 

1,312 
1,122 

(NA) 

(NA) 



(NA) 

1,503 
(NA) 
(NA) 

164 

238 
(NA) 
681 

2,713 
1,247 

1,050 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

135 

(NA) 
2,077 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

1,317 

(NA) 
2,816 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
994 
298 

(NA) 
133 

(NA) 
618 

4,459 
3,521 

(NA) 

(NA) 



(NA) 

3 307 
(NA) 

(NA) 

114 

70 
(NA) 
816 

939 
366 

^353 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(D) 

(NA) 
280 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

492 

(NA) 
536 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
303 

75 
(NA) 

59 

(NA) 
265 

^1,636 
1,386 

(NA) 

(NA) 



5,158 

*1,749 
23,298 
20,382 

199 

267 

29 

1,166 

3,517 
1,600 

"^1,384 

(D) 

75 

640 

96 

8,362 
2,305 

7,602 

5,867 

1,735 

1,423 

21,407 
3,165 

19,738 

3,053 

1,313 

1,193 

372 

290 

164 

1,154 
746 

*5,967 
4,784 

12,344 

10,029 



(NA) 

=61 
(NA) 
(NA) 

79 

41 

(NA) 

331 

135 
13 

5l9 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(D) 

(NA) 
52 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

386 

(NA) 
187 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(MA) 

104 

1 

(NA) 

28 

(NA) 
137 

'128 
123 

(NA) 

(NA) 



10 



132 
*767 
(NA) 

38 

(NA) 

(NA) 

76 



292 

141 



'•864 

(NA) 

30 

36 

*602 

(NA) 

^338 

338 

(NA) 

^60 

^1,052 

(NA) 

^1,105 
(NA) 

149 

149 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
58 

6233 

190 

*455 
432 



(NA) 

10764 
(NA) 
(NA) 

246 

(NA) 

(NA) 

633 

2,730 
1,514 

10g30 

(NA) 

(NA) 

148 

216 

^5,982 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

11^79 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

757 
757 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

3,141 
2,574 

(NA) 

(NA) 



See footnotes at end of table. 



10-12 MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 

Table 3.-Gencral Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954-Continued 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 
or more 
employ- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
Installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



195^^ 



All 

eitt- 
ploy- 

ees, 
number 



Value 

added 

in 

($1,000) 



13 
131 



13 
131 

138 

131 
138 
lA 

12 
144 



13 
131 



138 



COUNTIES— Continued 

Washington 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 

Wayne , total 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 

Oil and gas field services 

White 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 

Oil and gas field services 

Whiteside 

Will 

Sand and gravel 

Williamson 

Bituminous coal mining 

Winnebago (mineral industries 
only) 

Sard and gravel (mineral 
industries only) 

Undistributed, total 

Crude petroleum and natu- 
ral gas 

Oil and gas field services 



3A 
160 



112 
'i8 



192 



125 
62 



17 

10 

158 

76 
82 



12 



130 
82 

53 

655 

538 

117 

962 

530 
372 

21 

550 
203 

1,630 
1,618 



222 

187 

903 

5';8 
355 



A63 
345 

244 

2,887 

2,478 
409 

4,023 

2,441 
1,299 

90 

3,393 
1,039 

9,718 
9,675 

1,039 

875 

3,926 

2,526 

1,400 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

19 

497 

194 

(NA) 
1,446 



184 

153 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

29 

995 
356 

(NA) 
2,651 



427 

358 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

78 

2,970 
949 

(NA) 
8,533 



875 

733 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

257 

8,614 
3,283 

(NA) 
19,512 



1,587 

1,262 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

80 

3,718 
1,168 

(NA) 
9,382 



728 
495 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



3,106 
2,810 

2,472 

21,514 

19,357 
2,157 

26,339 

20,316 
4,871 

308 

10,832 
4,173 

25,897 
25,693 

2,142 

1,660 

13,084 

9,263 
3,821 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

29 

1,500 
278 

(NA) 
3,201 



173 

97 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



*82 
*36 

36 

*725 

725 
(NA) 

'704 

641 
(NA) 

36 

366 
(NA) 

2,048 
2,043 

157 

145 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

256 

4,222 
(NA) 

17,674 
17.674 



1,559 

1,379 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

NA Not available. 

■"■Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Companies operating oil and gas field properties were permitted to make only one report for all oil and gas field operations in each S'tate. 
Companies engaged only in performing oil and gas field or other mining services were permitted to make only one report for all States; these reports 
were classified on the basis of the principal State in which the service was performed. For 1958, such reports contained employment on March 15 and 
selected other data by State and county. For such operations, the State tctal figures shown for number of establishments represent the number of 
reports received which were classified in the State and those shown for number of establishments in a county represent the number of reports that 
indicated any operations in the specified county. All county statistics shown which were not reported separately were obtained by allocating the 
totals reported for each company on the basis of the reported county data. 

■'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased machin- 
ery installed. 

*See table 2A, footnote 2. 

'Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, aand and gravel, and clay mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'Excludes data for the Oil and Gas Field Services Industries. 

'includes data for the Bituminous Coal Mining Industries. 

*For 1958, includes data for central offices and related facilities in the Bituminous Coal, Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas, and Uranlum-Radium- 
Vanadium Ores Industries and for 1954, in the Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Industry. 

'Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 
^"Represents mineral industries only. 
■"■^Excludes data for one establishment in the Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Industry. 



ILLINOIS 



10-1 !. 



Tabic 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Cold an\ silver ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 Metal mining services 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 
120 Bituminous coal 



12C Coal ml nine services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

141 Dimension stone 

141M Dimension stone in manufactures 

142 Crushed and broken stone 

142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 
144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and grravel in manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonmetalllc minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c, in 

manufactures 



(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 





All mineral operetlcais 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


12C' 


1311 


132 


138^ 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148^ 


149 


149 
M 


Illinois, total 

No enployees 

0-4 employees 

5-9 employees 

10-19 employees. . . 

20-49 employees 

50-99 employees. . . 
100-249 employees. 

250-499 employees. 
500-999 employees. 

COUNTIES 

AdBM: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 

Alexander: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees... 

Bood: 

0-19 employees. .. . 

Boone; 

0-19 employees. .. . 

Brown: 

0-19 employees. . . . 

Bureau : 

0-19 employees. . .. 
100-249 employees. 

Calhoun: 

0-19 employees 

Carroll: 

0-19 employees.... 

Cass: 

0-19 employees.... 

Champaign: 

0-19 employees.... 

Christian: 

0-19 employees. . . . 
20-99 employees... 
250 employees 


1,375 

114 
574 
216 

213 

158 

44 

41 

9 
6 

12 

1 

4 

39 

3 
5 

9 

1 

4 
6 
2 
6 

32 

2 

41 
3 

112 

3 
1 

76 

2 

45 
3 

20 
8 
2 


1,323 
112 
547 
205 

206 
134 
43 

41 

9 
6 

11 

1 

4 
1 

38 

3 
4 
8 

4 
6 
2 
6 

32 

2 

1 

41 
3 

112 
3 

1 

76 
2 

45 
3 

12 
7 
2 


52 

2 
27 

11 

7 

4 

1 

1 


... 




5 

1 
1 

1 
2 




... 








141 

7 

21 

25 

17 
24 
10 
27 

6 
4 


' 


547 
75 

298 
65 

47 

45 

4 

2 
2 


5 
5 


247 

7 

97 

44 

62 

29 

7 

1 


7 

1 
5 

1 


1 

1 


153 

7 

45 

34 

37 

18 

8 

4 


5 

1 

2 

1 
1 


171 
10 
65 
25 

36 

28 

4 

3 


8 

4 
2 

2 


13 
2 
5 
2 

1 
2 

i 


38 
2 

23 
7 

5 

1 


25 

3 
5 
8 

3 
1 
2 
2 

1 


4 

2 

1 

1 


5 
3 

1 
1 




























1 






8 

1 

1 


1 


1 










































































2 












1 
1 












































- 


















22 




14 










2 
2 

1 
7 


1 
































1 
2 
















1 
2 
































1 
2 


































































































3 




1 
2 
















































































2 














































6 


































23 

- 




9 

1 












































































































Clark: 

0-19 employees. .. . 
20-99 employees... 

Clay: 

0-19 employees. . . . 
20-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 

Clinton: 

0-19 employees. . . . 
20-99 employees... 

Coles: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Cook: 

0-19 employees. . . . 
20-99 employees. . . 
100-24^ employees. 




















24 
2 

78 

1 

49 
36 




13 










1 




































































33 
3 






















































































































24 






2 




1 




































































8 

1 


3 




1 

1 
4 
2 






















































8 

1 


















6 

3 






7 






2 






















































... 







'See table 3, footnote 2. 



10-14 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4.-Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties; 1958— Continued 







(Counties and s 


ize 


classes 


in which 


no 


mineral operations were 


reported 


are 


omitted) 


















All mineral operations 


Number of operations by Industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


state, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


12Ci 


ml 


132 


138^ 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148^ 


149 


149 
M 


COUNTIES— Continued 

Crawford: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 

Cumberland: 

0-19 employees. . .. 
20-99 employees... 

De Kalb: 

0-19 employees. . . . 
20-99 employees . . . 

De Witt: 

0-19 employees. . . . 

Douglas: 

0-19 employees. . . . 
20-99 employees... 

Du Page: 

0-19 employees. .. . 
20-99 employees... 

Edgar: 

0-19 employees. . . . 

Edwards : 

0-19 employees. .. . 
20-99 employees... 

Effingham: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 

Fayette: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 

Ford: 

0-19 employees. .. . 

Franklin: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 
250 employees 
and over. 


73 
4 

1 

10 

1 

2 

1 

2 

14 
2 

2 
3 

7 

74 

1 

53 

1 

45 
3 

1 

1 

49 

1 
1 

3 

8 

3 
4 

87 

1 

4 

3 

101 
5 

5 

23 
3 
2 

1 
6 
6 


73 
4 
1 

10 
1 

2 

1 

2 

14 
2 

2 
2 

7 

73 

1 

53 

1 

44 
3 

1 

1 

49 

1 
1 

3 

8 
3 
4 

87 

1 

4 

2 

101 
5 

5 

23 

3 
2 

1 
6 
6 




















1 
1 

3 

5 
3 
4 

2 

1 

1 

1 

2 

1 


1 


43 
3 

1 

5 

1 




28 
1 










2 






















































































































4 










1 






















































































2 

1 

2 






























































































































14 






































































































2 

1 
















1 




























1 




1 






























5 

56 

1 

38 

1 

29 

1 




2 

17 


















1 
































1 
























































14 




























































1 




















12 
2 










3 






1 












































































































1 


































37 




11 


































































































































































Fulton: 

0-19 employees.. .. 
20-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 

Gallatin: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees... 

Greene : 

0-19 employees. . . . 

Grundy: 

0-19 employees. . .. 

Hamilton: 

0-19 employees. . . . 
20-99 employees... 

Hancock: 

0-19 employees . 

Hardin: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 
250 employees 
and over 


































2 




























































































































52 




33 
































































































2 




1 




1 


1 




1 






1 














































72 
2 

1 




29 
2 












































































3 
4 




1 
















... 
































14 
3 
2 

1 


2 














































































































Henderson: 

0-19 employees. . . . 

Henry: 

0-19 emp-oyees. . . . 
20-99 employees... 




















... 




1 
1 






5 
































3 














/ 


... 






















• ■ • 






• • ■ 








./. 





^See table 3, footnote 2. 



ILLINOIS 



10-15 



Tabic 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties; 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes In which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 


All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles)— 


Total 


Classi- 
fied In 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


12C^ 


131' 


132 


138^ 


141 


141 
M 


K2 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148^ 


149 


149 
M 


COUNTIES— Continued 

Iroquois: 

0-19 employees 

Jackson: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 eaployees... 
100-249 employees. 

Jasper: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 

Jefferson: 

0-19 employees. . .. 
20-99 eaployees... 
2S0 eaployees 
and oTer 


1 

5 
2 
2 

64 

3 

4 
1 

1 

3 
3 

1 
2 

5 
3 

6 

1 

2 

4 
1 
3 

14 

24 
7 
2 

S4 
3 

1 

8 

7 
3 

2 
2 

9 

1 

7 

4 

2 

1 

10 
2 


1 

5 
2 
2 

64 

3 

TV 
4 

1 
1 

3 

3 

1 
2 

5 
3 

3 

1 

2 

3 
1 
3 

12 

17 

4 
2 

84 

3 

1 

6 

6 
3 

2 

2 

7 

i 

7 
4 

2 

1 

10 

2 

1 




















1 
2 
2 

1 
1 

1 
3 




1 


















































1 














1 
























































, 










































43 

53 
3 


... 


21 
3 

24 

1 


























































































































































































Jersey: 

0-19 eaployees.. .. 

Jo Darless: 

0-19 eaployees.... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Johnsoo: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 eaployees... 

Kane: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 

Kankakee: 

0-19 employees 

100-249 employees. 

Kendall: 
0-19 eaployees.... 

Knox: 

0-19 eaployees.... 
20-99 eaployees... 
100-249 eaployees. 

Ukn: 

0-19 eaployees.... 

U Salle: 

0-19 eaployees 

20-99 eaployees . . . 
100-249 eaployees. 

Lawrence: 

0-19 eaployees .... 
20-99 employees... 
250 eaployees 
and over ......... 
























































1 
3 




















































































































































































































































































3 




























































































































































































2 

7 
3 
































11 

10 
2 
2 

1 


1 


3 
1 


1 

6 
1 


... 




1 
































1 
2 






















... 














































49 
2 

1 


... 


34 

1 










































































































Lee: 

0-19 employees.... 

Lirlngston: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 eaployees... 

Logan: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 

McDonough: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 

McHenry: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 

McLean: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 e^loyees... 


2 

1 














1 














1 


1 
2 

1 
1 

1 


1 


























1 










1 


1 


... 




... 






































































































2 


















2 
















3 


2 
































































6 
4 

2 
1 

3 








































































































































... 




... 




— 






Macon: 

0-19 employees 

Macoupin: 

0-19 employees.. . . 

20-99 employees... 

100-249 employees. 


... 








... 


... 




... 




5 

1 


... 






... 




... 






















































. . . 
































. . . 


. . . 









^See table 3, footnote 2. 



10-16 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Tabic 4.-Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(CouDtles and size classes In which no mineral operations were reported are ondtted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 



In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



104 



105 



106 



108^ 



109 



120 



12C^ 



131 ^ 



132 



138^ 



Ul 



1A2 



144 



K5 



U7 



148' 149 



149 
M 



COUNTIES— Continued 

Madison: 

0-19 employees... 
20-99 employees.. 
100-249 employees 

Marion: 

0-19 employees . . . 
20-99 employees . . 
250 employees 
and over 



Marshall: 

0-19 employees . . . 
20-99 employees.. 

Mason: 

0-19 employees 

Massac: 

0-19 employees . . . 

Menard: 

0-19 employees . . . 

Mercer: 

0-19 employees... 

Monroe : 

20-99 employees.. 

Montgomery: 

0-19 employees... 
250 employees 
and over 



Moultrie: 

0-19 employees . . . 

Ogle: 

0-19 employees . . . 
20-99 employees.. 

Peoria: 

0-19 employees... 
20-99 employees . . 

Perry: 

0-19 employees... 
100-249 employees 

Piatt: 

0-19 employees . . . 

Pike: 

0-19 employees . . . 

Pope: 

0-19 employees . . . 

Pulaski: 

0-19 employees . . . 
20-99 employees.. 

Randolph: 

0-19 employees... 
20-99 employees.. 
100-249 employees 

Richland: 

0-19 employees . . 
20-99 employees. 
250 employees 
and over 



Rock Island: 

0-19 employees. . 
20-99 employees, 

St. Clair: 

0-19 employees. . 
20-99 employees. 
100-249 employees 
250 employees 
and over 



26 

3 
1 

73 

3 



14 
3 

9 

3 

6 

11 
3 

1 

1 

9 
1 
2 

77 

1 



9 

1 

14 
7 
3 



14 



52 



^See table 3, footnote 2. 



LLINOIS 



10-17 



Tabic 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 





All ndneral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries 1 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


1081 


109 


120 


120^ 


131 1 


132 


138^ 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148^ 


149 


149 
M 


COUNTIES— Continued 

Saline: 

0-19 employees . 

20-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 


78 

1 
3 

S 

4 

3 

1 

4 

11 

1 

6 

5 
3 

4 

1 

10 
2 

1 

132 
5 

1 

50 

155 
4 

1 

180 

12 

8 

5 
7 
2 

27 
8 
2 

3 

14 
4 

154 
4 


78 

1 
3 

6 

4 

3 

1 

4 

11 

1 

6 

4 
3 

4 

1 

9 
2 

1 

132 
5 

1 

50 

155 
4 

1 

180 
12 

8 

5 
7 
2 

27 
8 
2 

3 

13 
4 

154 
4 
















1 




7 
1 
3 

2 

1 
1 

5 

1 
1 

2 

1 
1 

16 
8 
2 

3 


... 


46 




21 






i 




























































































Sangamon: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 


2 


















1 




3 










1 
2 





1 


2 





































Schuyler : 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees... 

Scott : 

0-19 employees 

Shelby: 

0-19 employees 

Stark: 

0-19 employees 

Stephenson ; 

0-19 employees 

Tazewell: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 

Union: 

0-19 employees . 

20-99 employees . . . 

Vermilion: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 

Wabash: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees... 

Warren: 

0-19 employees 

Washington: 

0-19 employees 

Wayne: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 

White: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees... 

Whiteside: 

0-19 employees 

Will: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees... 
100-249 employees. 

Williamson: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 
250 employees 






























2 
















































































9 




1 


... 


... 


2 


... 


2 

1 
1 




















































































































6 


... 
















1 






















2 






2 
3 






1 





























































2 





2 

1 


... 


















































1 














1 















3 






1 
































1 




































































93 

4 




38 

1 










1 














































































1 
1 


... 




































34 

108 
3 
1 

119 
6 


... 


13 

47 

1 


... 


... 


























































































































































1 


57 
5 










2 










1 
































































5 
3 


... 


3 

3 
3 

1 























































































































































6 




5 


































































































































































Winnebago : 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees... 

Undistributed: 

0-19 employees 

20-99 employees... 


1 




























7 




6 

4 








































































74 
2 


... 


80 
2 













































































































'■See table 3, footnote 2. 



i 



i 



INDIANA 



11-1 



11-2 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES --AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining by County: i958 



INDIANA 



RANK AMONG STATES 
EMPLOYMENT • 20 
VALUE OF SHIPMENTS -24 




© 



KOSCIUSKO 



^ MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

Q INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 




U. S. DEPARTMEhfT OF COAAAAERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



© ly EMPLOYMENT 

8000- 12000 

4000- 7999 

2000- 3999 — - 

1000- 1999 

500 - 999 

200 - 499 — - 

25- 199 — ^ 




MINING IN INDIANA 

Employment For Industry Group By County: 1958 



11-3 



Metal Mining 



•Lew THAN as EuPLOvees 




Oil and Gas Extraction 




General Extent of Ol and Gas Ftekls 



Coal Mining 




General Extent of Coal Fields 



Nonmetallic Minerals Mining 





U. S. DEPAITMEKT Of COMMSKI 



2.500 5,000 

Numtmf of Cmployci 



'SCO 10.000 



HIKAU or THE CBffiUS 



11-4 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 

Employment in Mining 

including Mining in IVIanufactures: 1902- 1958 
INDIANA 



30 



20 



10 



1902 1909 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



p$pnOIL AND GAS EXTRACTION 

l v , - . v , v . v ,l (^p, ovoiloblo (or 1920) 



^^ NONMETALLIC MINERALS MINING 
l^H COAL MINING 



INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 




1919 1929 

CENSUS YEAR 



1939 



1954 1958 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



INDIANA 



11-5 



Tabic 1.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations; 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of coluim captions see Introduction. For more detailed hiatorioal statistics for this State, see table 1 of the correspondtng 
chapter of the 1954 Census of Mineral Industries, Vol. II. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 



Kind of operation 
and year 



Establish- 
ments, 
number 



To- 
tal 



20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 
added 

in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
in- 
stalled 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ^ 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



Quergy used 

(kwh 
equivalent ) 



Total 

(mil- 
lion) 



Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
vrorker 

(1,000) 



Mineral Industries 
only: 

1958 

1954 



Including operations 
in manufactures: 
All operations: 

1958 

1954* 

1939' 

1919' 

1909'' 

1902' 

Excluding oil and 
gas extraction 
Industries: 

1958, 

1954* 

1939' 

1929^1 

1919' 

1909' 

1902' 



720 
776 



781 

815 

^576 

503 

1,035 

63,975 



429 
486 

'453 
399 
372 
388 

*516 



95 
101 



109 
113 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



95 
99 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



8,768 
9,184 



10,418 
11,039 
12,396 
28,399 
25,057 
17,512 



8,769 
9,315 
11,663 
17,984 
27,878 
22,905 
14,413 



43,549 
38,153 



50,579 
45,112 
15,854 
34,271 
15,895 
11,826 



43,619 
38,828 
14,833 
26,449 
33,633 
14,834 
9,603 



7,076 
7,782 



8,591 

9,576 

11,398 

26,751 

23,952 

1°15,906 



7,381 
8,308 
10,832 
16,742 
26,348 
22,577 
'13,504 



13,069 
14,304 



15,783 

17,863 

18,542 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



13,779 
15,745 
17,558 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



32,432 
29,866 



38,547 
36,443 
13,671 
30,193 
14,793 
10,463 



34,478 
32,714 
13,040 
23,376 
29,717 
13,966 
8,830 



102,989 
85,201 



117,928 
98,331 
28,094 
44,065 
19,210 
21,353 



89,134 
75,016 
^27,147 
40,995 
42,064 
16,785 
12,069 



27,967 
22,739 



2 30,468 

2 25, 502 
7,955 
8,384 
2,399 
3,400 



2 24, 557 

^20,404 

7,690 

7,884 

8,o;6 

1,904 
1,236 



2,372 
18,418 



2,372 

18,429 

(NA) 

51 

23 

(NA) 



2,372 

18,429 

(NA) 

(NA) 



(NA) 



6,034 
6,498 



^6,220 

=6,589 

1,338 

340 

302 

2,186 



^1,894 

=1,063 

133 

114 

126 

20 

27 



12,479 
12,772 



^12,922 

^13,270 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



'10,726 
'10,871 
(NA) 
1,596 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



136,511 
129.720 



154,118 
145,816 
37,387 
52,840 
21,934 
26,939 



117,943 
115,129 
34,970 
48,993 
50,236 
18,709 
13,332 



15,330 
15,908 



^15,792 
^16,305 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



^10,740 
^10,654 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



1, 630 
1,369 



^1,721* 

^1,506 

1,888 

^6,107 

(NA) 

(NA) 



'■^1,25'^ 
1,140 
1,766 
3,643 
5,945 
(NA) 
(NA) 



250 
176 



201 
157 
166 
228 
(NA) 
(NA) 



170 
137 
163 
218 
226 
(NA) 
(NA) 



NA Not available. ^Revised. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsvrai mining operations in maniifacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment in making manufactxired products. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of ship- 
ments (or production for 1919 and 1909) and contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for 
preparation. The approximate magnitude of this duplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other 
years, represents net production and excludes this duplication. 

=For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is in- 
cluded with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

■'Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

*Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'Except, in part, for value of shipments and value added, excludes data for dimension stone dressing plants operated in conjunction with quarries. 
The value added in dressing limestone at such operations was $1,119 thousand; this value has been included in the value of shipments and value added 
in mining. For "All operations," includes data for 1 or 2 oil and gas field hauling operations, with receipts for services amounting to less than 
$417 thousand; such operations were not classified in the mineral industries for 1958 and 1954. For "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries," 
except for number of establishments, excludes data for 1 mining services establishment. 

^Represents number of mines and quarries and, for crude petroleum and natural gas and mining services industries, number of operating companies. 

'Excludes data for sand and gravel operations and stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime establishments . In 1929 there were 58 such 
sand and gravel establishments with products valued at $4,453 thousand; 4 such stone quarries at cement plants with products valued at $535 thousand; 
and 1 such stone quarry at a lime plant. See also footnote 11. For "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries" in 1909, except for number of estab- 
lishments, excludes data for 1 nonproducing establishment. 

^Excludes purchased electricity. For "All operations" in 1939, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to 5 percent of the total 
tarti equivalent of energy used; and for "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries" in 1929, to only 3 percent. 

'Excludes data for sand and gravel and common clay and shale operations and for stone quarries at cement plants. Includes data for lime plants pro- 
ducing lime valued at $312 thousand. For "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries," excludes data for nonproducing establishments. 

^"Figures for average eiqjloyment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments irtiich operated for a shorter period. 

^•"■Excludes data for common clay and shale establishments. For 1939, the value of products of such establishments was $154 thousand. 



11-6 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



12 
1211 

13 

1311 
138 
1381 



14 



1411 



U21 



1441 



145 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Industry group and industry 



Total 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included In manufactures . . . . 

Bituminous coal mining 

Bituminous coal 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas 

Oil and gas field services ,. 

Drilling oil and gas wells . . . . 

Nonnietallic minerals mi-n^-nQ .,,,,,, 

Mineral industries' 

Included in manufactures 

Dimension stone 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures .... 

Dimension limestone 

Mineral eubindustry 

Included in manufactures .... 

Dimension stcme, nee 

Mineral subindustry 

Crushed and broken stone 

(mineral industry only) 

Crushed and broken limestone 
(mineral subindustry only)... 

Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry 

Included in manufactures .... 

Clay and related minerals 

Mineral industries 

Included in man\if actures .... 

Clay and related minerals, nee 



781 

720 

61 

91 



352 

266 

86 

64 

338 

277 

61 

29 

17 

12 

23 

14 

9 

6 

3 



67 

62 

195 

178 

17 

34 

7 

27 

25 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



109 
95 
14 

34 
34 

14 

12 

2 

2 

61 

47 
14 

16 
7 
9 

14 
6 



All enployees 



Number 



10,418 

8,768 

*1,650 

4,105 
4,104 

1,649 

1,179 

470 

384 

4,664 

3,014 

*1,650 

1,767 

398 

1,369 

1,669 

343 

1,326 

98 
55 



1,169 

1,045 

1,407 

1,335 

*72 

142 

66 

*76 

*111 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



50,579 
43,549 
*7,030 

22,858 
22,853 

6,960 
5,347 
1,613 
1,366 

20,761 
13,731 
*7,030 

7,494 
1,705 
5,789 

7,148 
1,500 
5,648 

346 

205 



5,196 

4,790 

6,652 
,377 
^275 



6,377 

4 



603 

289 

*314 

*447 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



8,591 

7,076 

*1,515 

3,412 
3,411 

1,210 
787 
423 
348 

3,969 

2,454 

*1,515 

1,580 

346 

1,234 

1,491 

298 

1,193 

89 
48 



988 

889 

1,112 

1,040 

*72 

121 

45 

*76 

*105 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



15,783 

13,069 

2,714 

5,726 
5,724 

2,004 

1,299 

705 

586 

8,053 
5,339 
2,714 

2,811 

657 

2,154 

2,675 

573 

2,102 

136 
84 



2,132 

1,958 

2,510 

2,367 

143 

282 
130 
152 

214 



Wages 
($1,000) 



38,547 

32,432 

6,115 

18,218 
18,213 

4,069 
2,737 
1,332 
1,114 

16,260 

10,145 

6,115 

6,157 
1,283 
4,874 

5,886 
1,120 
4,766 

271 
163 



4,021 

3,709 

4,759 

4,484 

275 

566 
252 
314 

422 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



117,928 

102,989 

14,939 

44,289 
44,268 

28,794 

25,323 

3,471 

2,959 

44,845 
29,906 
14,939 

11,399 
2,951 
8,448 

10,659 
2,506 
8,153 

740 
445 



12,989 

12,241 

14,130 

12,917 

1,213 

1,572 
659 
913 

1,121 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



^51,982 
48,852 
^3,130 

21,570 
21,542 

12,433 

10,716 

1,717 

1,527 

^17,979 
14,849 
^3,130 

2,824 

658 

2,166 

2,453 

500 

1,953 

371 
158 



7,519 
7,053 

^6,030 

5,937 
I93 

^825 

518 

^307 

^510 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



154,118 
136,511 
''17,607 

61,060 
61,014 

36,175 

31,361 

4,814 

4,124 

56,883 

39,276 

*17,607 

13,487 

3,335 

10,152 

12,568 
2,758 
9,810 

919 
577 



17,176 

16,181 

18,514 
17,208 
*1,306 

2,260 

1,040 

*1,220 

■^1,540 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



•15,792 

15,330 

^462 

4,799 
4,796 

5,052 

4,678 

374 

362 

25, 941 

5 479 

^462 

736 
274 
462 

544 
24S 
296 

192 
26 



3,332 

3,113 

^1,646 

1,646 

(NA) 

^137 
137 
(NA) 

291 



1954 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



^11,039 
9,184 
3l,855 

4,747 
4,744 

1,724 

1,238 

486 

336 

34, 568 

2,713 

^1,855 

1,912 

272 

1,640 

1,862 

222 

1,640 

50 
50 



^1,189 

1,082 

(NA) 
1,265 

(NA) 

188 
188 

118 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



^98,331 

85,201 

^13,130 

39,598 
39,588 

23,315 

19,951 

3,364 

2,330 

^35,418 

22,288 

^13,130 

11,748 
1,866 
9,882 

11,399 
1,517 
9,882 

349 
349 



^10,662 

8,495 

(NA) 

10,952 

(NA) 

1,985 
1,985 

1,276 



NA Not available. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsim mining operations in manufactiirlng establishments, excludes the cost of purchased 
machinery installed. 

^Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum m-tnlTig operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel nrlnine operations in manufacturing establishments. 

*For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the number of production and 
development workers was estimated frcm reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same 
figures are included for production and development workers and for all einplcyees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes the 
estimated value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment. 

'Except for number of establishments, includes figures for the Indiana operations of one service establishment primarily engaged in metal mining 
services in other States. 

'includes data for ininiTig operations in manufacturing establishments. 



INDIANA 



11-7 



Tabic 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 



(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



lad. 
code 



Industry group and industry 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Total 



Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 



De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 



Net shipments of primary products^ 



By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



12 

i?n 

13 
1311 

138 
1381 

1421 

lUl 



All Mineral Industries ., 

Bltmlnous coal ml nine 

Bituminous coal 

Oil and gas extraction. 

Crude petroleuB and natural 
gas 

Oil and gas field services 

Drilling oil and gas wells.,, 

Nazmetalllc minerals mining. , . . . , 

Crushed and broken stone 

Crushed and broken limestone, 

Sand and gravel 



48,852 

21,570 
21,542 

12,433 

10,716 

1,717 
1,527 

14,849 
7,519 
7,053 

5,937 



27,967 

^14,587 
^14,559 

5,911 

4,700 

1,211 
1,037 

39, 841 

34, 789 
34, 650 

^4,142 



2,372 



(') 



6,034 

775 
775 

4,326 

4,173 

153 
139 

933 
286 
243 

507 



12,479 

6,208 
6,208 

2,196 

1,843 

353 
351 

4,075 
2,444 
2,250 

1,288 



15,330 

4,799 
4,796 

5,052 

4,678 

374 
362 

5,479 
3,332 
3,113 

1,646 



2,262 

97 
97 

2,011 

1,971 

40 
40 

154 
119 
114 

22 



13,068 

4,702 
4,699 

3,041 

2,707 

334 
322 

5,325 
3,213 
2,999 

1,624 



XXX 

15,047 



^^10,309 

XXX 
XXX 

XXX 

11,979 
11,458 

17,412 



XXX 

58,071 



30,771 

XXX 

*4,134 



XXX 

16,871 
15,824 

'17, 209 



XXX 

12 



5g3 

XXX 
XXX 

XXX 

■^2,268 
■^2,179 

''1, 368 



XXX 

45 



271 

XXX 

(*) 

XXX 

'2,468 
''2,425 



(«) 



^Represents gross shipments of the mineral Indicated by the Industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received frcm other establishments for preparation, 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment, 

^Figures for cost of minerals received for preparation are included with those for cost of 8V5)plies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and 
electricity. 

^Represents thousands of barrels of crude petroleum shipped or used. In addition, 467 millicm cubic feet of natural gas were shipped, valued at 
$62 thousand; this value Is included in the succeeding column. 

'Represents thousands of barrels of crude petroleum shipped or used. 

^Figures for primary servloes performed in other Industries are Included with those for prlnaiy services performed in the specified industry. 

'includes minerals produced and used in the same establishment in tub vt Tig manufactured products. The value of such minerals was estimated. 

^Figures for the value of primary products shipped in other industries are included with those for the value of primary products shipped in the 
specified industry. See also footnote 7. 



11-8 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Mining only 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods ^ 



Mines with preparation plants 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 
mines 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 


Nonp re- 


rately 


ducing 


oper- 


estab- 


ated 


lish- 


prepa- 


ments 


ration 




plants 





1211 



1311 



lA 



1«1 



1^1 



All Industries: 

Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mln±ng $1,000. 

Bituminous coal: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in miniog... $1,000. 

Crude petroleum and natural gas: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining... $1,000. 

Nonmetallic minerals mining: 

Number of establishments.. 

Number of employees 

Value added in mining. ..$1,000. 

Crushed and broken stone: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees , 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Crushed and broken limestone: 
Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 



629 
8,281 

99,255 



-ijlO^ 
<W,268 



266 

1,179 

25,323 



275 

2,998 

29,664 



67 
1,169 

12,989 



62 
1,045 

12,241 



178 
1,335 

12,917 



612 
8,268 

100,351 



86 

(D) 
(D) 



252 

1,169 

25,419 



383 
2,148 

39,214 



43 
(D) 
(D) 



252 

1,169 

25,419 



24 
136 



585 



20 
(D) 
(D) 



83 
816 

12,636 



23 

283 

8,533 



276 
1,196 

25,993 



226 
6,052 

60,729 



42 
(D) 
(D) 



22 
2,169 

14,874 



21 
(D) 
(D) 



186 
3,581 

43,644 



21 

1,493 

21,340 



18 
302 

2,211 



274 
(D) 
(D) 



67 
1,169 

12,989 



62 
1,045 

12,241 



178 
1,335 

12,917 



(D) 
(D) 



6 
(D) 

(D) 



5 
(D) 

(D) 



60 

94 

1,067 



4 
(D) 
(D) 



3 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



60 

533 

4.103 



268 



4 
(D) 

(D) 



36 
67 



493 



252 
1,169 

25,419 



24 

27 

574 



574 



184 
(D) 
(D) 



59 
(D) 

(D) 



56 
(D) 

(D) 



118 
1,241 

11,850 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



165 

2,088 

22,304 



58 
1,098 

12,301 



55 
988 

11,643 



100 
939 

9,639 



18 

302 

2,211 



18 
302 

2,211 



408 



1 
(D) 
(D) 



2 

(D) 
(D) 



2 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



17 
13 



2 
(D) 
(D) 



14 
10 

(3) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual conjianies. 

•"•Includes data for 19 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
^Includes data for 8 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of m^jTTJTig was not specified. 

^Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery Installed exceeded the capital 
expenses. 



INDIANA 



11-9 



Tabic 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954 









(For explanation of c 


oluim ca 


jtions see Introductic^n) 














County and industry group 


1958 


19 


54^ 


Ind. 


Establishments, 
number^ 


All enployees 


Production and 
development vrorkers 


Value 

added in 

mining 


Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
installed 


Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts' 


Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 


All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 


Value 


code 


Total 


With 20 
or more 
einjloy- 


Number 


Pay- 
roll 


Number 


Man- 
hours 


Wages 


In 
mining 








ees 




($1,000) 




(1,000) 


($1,000) 


($1,000) 


($1,000) 


($1,000) 


($1,000) 




($1,000) 




INDIANA: 

All Mineral operatians 

Mineral Industries 

Included in manufactures.. 


781 

720 

61 


109 
95 
14 


10,418 

8,768 

*1,650 


50,579 
43,549 
*7,030 


8,591 

7,076 

*1,515 


15,783 

13,069 

2,714 


38,547 

32,432 

6,115 


117,928 

102,989 

14,939 


3 51, 982 
48,852 

33,130 


*154,118 
136,511 
*17,607 


'15,792 

15,330 

*462 


11,039 

9,184 

^1,855 


98,331 
85,201 
13,130 




COUimKS 






























Adaas (including qperatlcns 
In ■miMf'x'trrp^s) , , 


6 
5 

5 


1 
1 


653 
57 

56 


*222 
303 

285 


*47 
20 

50 


101 
39 

111 


197 
95 

226 


463 
613 

590 


3155 
294 

337 


*573 
860 

806 


545 
47 

121 


50 
89 

77 


293 


144 


Allen. 


642 


14 


Clark (aineral industries 
cnlj) 


728 


1211 


Clay (Mineral industries 
csUy) 


19 

12 


3 
3 


284 
233 


1,476 
1,253 


(NA) 
193 


(NA) 
311 


(NA) 
1,034 


(NA) 
2,907 


(NA) 
834 


4,404 
3,678 


(NA) 
63 


•^378 
345 


(NA) 
3,063 




Daviess 


7 


1 


46 


118 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


203 


(NA) 


■^70 


(NA) 


U2 


Decatur. ...................... 


4 
7 
9 

9 


2 

1 


50 
19 
67 

14 


156 

79 

352 

55 


46 
17 
52 

(NA) 


80 
36 
92 

(NA) 


137 

72 

248 

(NA) 


367 
205 
871 

(NA) 


(D) 

27 

424 

(NA) 


577 

214 

1,168 

117 


(D) 

18 

127 

(NA) 


37 
17 
38 

'24 


165 


144 


De Kalb 


172 




Delaware 


685 




Dubois (Mineral industries 
only) 


(NA) 


144 


only) 


4 




21 


U4 


17 


39 


85 


236 


73 


299 


10 


28 


270 




Fountain (including operatioms 


7 
126 

79 


1 
3 

2 


*49 
643 

255 


«296 
2,658 

1,141 


639 
(NA) 
(NA) 


76 
(NA) 

(NA) 


188 
(NA) 

(NA) 


473 
(NA) 

(NA) 


(D) 
(NA) 

(NA) 


*623 
13,662 

9,961 


(D) 
(NA) 

(NA) 


«43 
'631 

267 


8359 




Gibson. 


(NA) 


131 


Crvkle petroleum and 
natural gas 


(NA) 


U 


HaMllton. 


8 


... 


37 


161 


30 


65 


124 


662 


(D) 


800 


(D) 


33 


293 


1A2 


Harrison. 


4 


... 


35 


102 


35 


53 


102 


377 


258 


325 


310 


23 


123 




Hendrlclcs (mineral industries 
aaly) 


4 




43 


211 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


627 


(NA) 


(NA) 


(NA) 


VA 


Heniy (Mineral Industries 
only) 


7 


... 


17 


113 


14 


39 


73 


85 


136 


122 


99 


12 


(NA) 


U 




3 
5 
5 


1 

• • • 

• • • 


45 

*14 

4 


102 

647 

18 


44 
^14 
(NA) 


38 

24 

(NA) 


97 

47 

(NA) 


424 
153 
(NA) 


183 
335 
(NA) 


577 

*167 

20 


30 
(NA) 


32 

«22 

16 


294 




Jackson (includliig operations 
■•i Mwnuf wctiirf^p) ............. 


^163 






83 


i?n 


Knnr (vtitpral industries 
only) 

Bit\Klnous co€a irlTiIng 


33 
7 


5 

5 


495 
437 


2,567 
2,331 


(NA) 
389 


(NA) 
616 


(NA) 
1,970 


(NA) 
3,861 


(NA) 
1,332 


5,796 
4,909 


(NA) 
284 


'553 
494 


(NA) 
3,788 




only) 


4 




25 


no 


18 


24 


75 


143 


(D) 


424 


(D) 


12 


134 




Ti'>vr<TVje, t.<rt*l.,... ........ .. 


16 
9 
7 


8 
4 
4 


985 
151 
834 


4,125 

640 

3,435 


890 
128 
762 


1,509 

194 

1,315 


3,534 

538 

2,996 


6,435 
1,150 
5,335 


2,064 

882 

1,182 


8,069 
1,700 
6,369 


480 
332 
143 


(NA) 

97 

(NA) 


(NA) 


14 


Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures.. 


785 
(NA) 


U 


MadlBon, ...................... 


9 

12 


1 
2 


54 
256 


325 
1,684 


45 
107 


120 
254 


260 
551 


729 
1,828 


323 
737 


893 
2,468 


159 
97 


57 
354 


543 




M»rlon (Mineral Industrlep 


2,142 


144 


Marshall 


6 

6 

17 
11 

6 


2 

10 
5 

5 


3 

69 

835 
302 

533 


15 

320 

3,722 
1,383 

2,339 


3 

68 

730 
260 

470 


8 

135 

1,380 
442 

938 


15 

313 

2,925 
1,012 

1,913 


105 

2,857 

6,222 
2,667 

3,555 


43 

(D) 

1,346 
437 

909 


124 

3,163 

7,051 
2,771 

4,280 


24 

(D) 

517 
333 

184 


(NA) 

826 

1,166 

204 

962 


(NA) 




■fTi ■'OlUfnotUT^p) ,,,,...,,.... 


(NA) 






8,016 




Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures 
(dlMinision stone) 


1,438 
6,528 




Morgan: 

!wniiif'>''tirrpn. ............ 


9 
6 


1 
1 


37 
30 


157 
130 


34 
27 


76 
61 


144 
117 


503 
359 


(D) 
(D) 


744 
576 


(D) 
(D) 


(NA) 
13 


(NA) 


14 


Mineral industries only... 


81 


144 


Noble 


5 
7 
6 


2 
2 


35 
101 
113 


149 
366 
634 


32 
78 
99 


72 
159 
182 


133 
271 
440 


251 

557 

1,316 


33 
393 
647 


247 

839 

1,641 


37 
111 
322 


(NA) 

50 

125 


(NA) 


14 




220 




Oven 


894 



See footnotes at end of table. 



11-10 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 3.-General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954-Continued 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



County and Industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 

or more 

enfiloy- 

ees 



All employees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts^ 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



195^1 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added 

in 

($1,000) 



12 

13 
131 

1^ 

13 

131 
133 

14 



12 



131 



1211 



12 



13 

131 



C OUNTIES — C ontinued 

Parke (mineral industries 
only) 



Pike, total 

Bituminous coal mining. 



Oil and gas exrtraction. 
Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 



Porter 

Posey 

Oil and gas extraction, 
total 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Oil and gas field services 

Putnam (minerals industries 
only) 



Randolph 

St. Joseph (mineral Industries 
only) 

Shelby (including qperatians 
in manufactures) 



66 
9 

57 

39 

A 

126 

123 

84 
39 



Spencer 

Sullivan. 

Bituminous coal mining. ..... 

Vanderburgh (mineral indus- 
tries only) 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas .............. 

Vermillion (mineral industries 
only) 

Vigo (mineral industries 
only) 

Bituminoxis coal mining. ..... 

Wabash (mineral industries 
only) 

Warrick 

Bituminous coal mining 

Wayne (including operations 
in manufactures ) 

Undistributed (oil and gas 

extraction) 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 



30 

671 
551 

120 

102 

16 

293 

281 

196 
85 

75 
46 

34 

60 

96 

390 
340 

311 
196 

83 



1,165 
964 



11 

671 
627 



^40 

268 
220 



159 

4,100 
3,582 

518 

456 

71 

1,200 

1,168 

876 
292 

383 
189 

186 

233 

424 

2,034 
1,803 

1,242 

876 

396 



6,504 
5,618 



44 

3,576 
3,421 

«164 

1,186 
983 



29 

(MA) 
464 

(NA) 

(NA) 

10 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

68 

(NA) 

30 

60 

(NA) 

(NA) 
288 

(NA) 
(NA) 

75 

(NA) 
855 

(NA) 

(NA) 
570 

^36 

(NA) 
(NA) 



66 

(NA) 
843 

(NA) 

(NA) 

30 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

153 
(NA) 

64 

120 

(NA) 

(NA) 
460 

(NA) 
(NA) 

141 

(NA) 
1,536 

(NA) 

(NA) 
965 

69 

(NA) 
(NA) 



154 

(NA) 
2,935 

(NA) 

(NA) 

46 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

298 

(NA) 

165 

233 

(NA) 

(NA) 
1,484 

(NA) 
(NA) 

349 

(NA) 
4,833 

(NA) 

(NA) 
2,984 

153 

(NA) 
(NA) 



329 

(NA) 
8,035 

(NA) 

(NA) 
230 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

959 

(NA) 

399 

686 

(NA) 

(NA) 
3,105 

(NA) 
(NA) 

805 

(NA) 
8,690 

(NA) 

(NA) 
12,035 

520 

(NA) 
(NA) 



105 

(NA) 
2,125 

(NA) 

(NA) 

76 

(NA) 

(HA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(D) 
(NA) 

279 

174 

(NA) 

(NA) 
1,005 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(D) 

(NA) 
3,383 

(NA) 

(NA) 
7,625 

^82 

(NA) 
(NA) 



419 

14,144 
9,947 

4,197 

3,626 

289 

10,493 

10,403 

9,229 
1,174 

1,510 
592 

658 

779 

1,459 

5,206 
4,046 

4,692 
3,881 

1,129 

13,136 
11,805 

74 

16,402 
16,045 

*602 

1,979 
1,393 



15 

(NA) 
213 

(NA) 

(NA) 

17 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(D) 
(NA) 

20 

81 

(NA) 

(NA) 
64 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(D) 

(NA) 
268 

(NA) 

(NA) 
3,615 

(NA) 

(MA) 
(NA) 



41 

■^627 
525 

(NA) 

102 

16 

■^267 

'256 

256 
(NA) 

79 
19 

41 

67 

'38 

'569 
486 

'236 
(NA) 

183 

'1,222 
1,006 

'10 

'863 
343 

*60 

(NA) 
(NA) 



382 

(NA) 
6,282 

(NA) 

(NA) 
186 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

849 
115 

425 

469 

(NA) 

(NA) 
3,309 

(NA) 
(NA) 

1,183 

(NA) 
7,263 

(NA) 

(NA) 
9,526 

464 

(NA) 
(NA) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

NA Not available. 

■"■Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operatlanB in manufacturing es"tablishments. 

^Conpanles operating oil and gas field properties were permitted to make only one report for all oil and gas field operations in each State. Cam- 
panles engaged in performing oil and gas field or other nrlTrlTig services ■were permitted to make only one report for nil States; these reports were 
classified on the basis of the principal State in which the service -was performed. For 1958, such reports contained e^loyment on March 15 and other 
selected data by State and county. For such operations, the State total figures shown for number of establishments represent the number of reports 
received which were classified in the State and those shown for nuniber of establishments in a county represent the number of reports that Indicated 
any operations In the specified county. All county statistics shown which were not reported separately were obtained by allocating the totals report- 
ed for each company on the basis of the reported coun'ty data. 

■'For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum m^jn-l-ng operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes ■the cost of purchased 
machinery installed. 

For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. Includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment. 

^Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum m^i-n^lTig otperatians in manufacturing establishments. 

*See table 2A, footnote 4. 

'Excludes data for Oil and Gas Field Services Industries. 

^Represents mineral Industries only. 



INDIANA 



1 1-11 



Tabic 4.— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 19 58 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Gold and silver ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 Metal mlnliig services 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 
120 Bituminous coal 



12C Coal mining services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

Kl Dimension stone 

141M Dimension stone in manufactures 

142 Crushed and broken stone 

142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 

144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel in manufactures 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonmetalllc minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c, in 

manufactures 



(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 



In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



104 



105 



106 



108^ 109 



120 



12C^ 



131^ 



132 



US- 



UI 



141 
M 



142 



144 



145 



147 



148^ 



149 



149 
M 



Indiana, total.. 
No employees . . 
0-4 employees . 
5-9 employees . 



10-19 employees 

20-49 en^jloyees . . . 
50-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees. 

250-499 employees. 
500-999 employees. 

COUNTIES 

Adams: 

0-19 en^jloyees . . . . 

Allen: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Bartholomew: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 
20-99 eii5)loyees 

Benton: 

0-19 engjloyees .... 

Blackford: 

0-19 eii5>loyees 

Boone: 

0-19 employees .... 

Brown: 

0-19 employees .... 

Carroll: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Cass: 

0-19 enployees 

Clark: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 
20-99 en5>loyees 

Clay: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 empl oyees . . . 

Crawford: 

20-99 employees . . . 

Daviess: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Dearborn: 

0-19 employees . . . . 

Decatur: 

0-19 engjloyees . 

20-99 engjloyees . . . 

De Kalb: 

0-19 employees .... 



781 

93 

356 

111 

U2 
76 
13 
15 

4 
1 



720 

91 

321 

106 

107 
69 
11 
11 



266 
41 

169 
30 

14 
10 

1 
1 



12 



178 
33 
68 
25 

39 

12 
1 



^See table 3, footnote 2. 



11-12 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4. -Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties; 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
Indus- 
tries^ 



In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



104 



105 



106 



108- 



109 



120 



12C-' 



131 1 



132 



1381 



Wl 



Ul 
M 



142 



l-W 



U5 



1A7 



lAS^ 



U9 



U9 
M 



COUNTIES — Cont inued 

Delaware: 

0-19 en^iloyees .... 
20-99 eir5)loyees 

Dubois : 

0-19 employees .... 

Elkhart: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 

Floyd: 

20-99 en^jloyees . . . 

Fountain: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Franklin: 

0-19 en^iloyees .... 

Fulton: 

0-19 enqjloyees .... 

Gibson: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 enqployees . . . 
250 employees 
and over 



11 



123 
2 



Grant: 

0-19 engjloyees . . . . 
20-99 en^Jloyees . . . 

Greene: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 
20-99 eiqiloyees . . . 

Hamilton: 

0-19 employees .... 

Hancock: 

0-19 en^jloyees . . . . 

Harrison: 

0-19 en5)loyees . . . . 

Hendricks : 

0-19 employees .... 

Henry: 

0-19 engployees .... 

Howard: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Huntington: 

0-19 enyloyees .... 

Jackson: 

0-19 enjjloyees .... 

Jasper: 

0-19 en^iloyees .... 
20-99 enjiloyees 

Jay: 

0-19 employees .... 

Jefferson: 

0-19 employees .... 

Jennings : 

20-99 employees . . . 



■■■See table 3, footnote 2. 



123 
2 



A3 



INDIANA 



11-13 



Tabic 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes In which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
Indus- 
tries^ 



In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



104 



105 



106 



108^ 



109 



120 



120^ 



131 1 



132 



138' 



Ul 



142 



1<W 



U5 



147 



14fii 



149 



149 
M 



CODNTIBS — Continued 

Diox: 

0-19 en5)loyees .... 

20-99 ei^iloyees . . . 

250 enployees and 

over 



Kosciusko: 

0-19 enJloyees . . . . 

Lagrange: 

0-19 enjiloyees . . . . 

Late: 

0-19 eiflployees . . . . 

La Porte: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 

Lawrence: 

0-19 ei^loyees . . . . 
20-99 e^loyees . . . 
100-249 ein)loyees. 
250 employees and 
over 



Itadlscn: 

0-19 enployees .... 
20-99 einjloyees . . . 

Marlcn: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 
20-99 en^jloyees . . . 

Marshall: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Martin: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 ea?)loyeee . . . 

Miami: 

0-19 ein)loyee8 .... 

Monroe: 

0-19 en5)loyees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 enployees. 

Mcntgooery: 

0-19 employees .... 

Morgan: 

0-19 enployees .... 
20-99 enployees . . . 

Nevton: 

0-19 enployees .... 
20-99 enployees . . . 

Noble: 

0-19 employees .... 

Orange: 

0-19 enployees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Owen: 

0-19 enployees . 

20-99 enployees . . . 

Parke: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 

Perry: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 
20-99 enployees . . . 



^See table 3, footnote 2. 



13 



11-14 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries ■'• 



In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by Industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



104 



105 



106 



108^ 



109 



120 



12C' 



131^ 



132 



138^ 



Wl 



1-12 



14A 



U5 



147 



1A8^ 



U9 



149 
M 



C OUNTIES — C ont inue d 

Pike: 

0-19 employees .... 62 

20-99 employees ... 1 

100-249 employees . 2 
250 employees and 

over 1 

Porter: 

0-19 employees . . 

Posey: 

0-19 employees .... 126 

Pulaski: 

0-19 employees 2 

20-99 employees 1 

Putnam: 

0-19 employees . 6 

20-99 employees 3 

Randolph: 

0-19 employees . . 

Hlpley: 

0-19 employees . . 

Rush: 

0-19 employees . . 

St. Joseph: 

0-19 eii5)loyBes . . 

Scott: 

0-19 employees . . 

Shelby: 

0-19 employees .... 5 

20-99 employees... 1 

Spencer: 

0-19 employees .... 39 

20-99 employees ... 1 

Starke : 

0-19 enployees .... 

Steuben : 

0-19 employees .... 

Sullivan : 

0-19 enployees .... 25 

20-99 employees ... 1 

100-249 employees. 

Switzerland: 

0-19 enfiloyees .... 1 

20-99 employees ... 1 

Tippecanoe: 

0-19 employees .... 3 

20-99 employees... 1 

Vanderburgh: 

0-19 employees .... 55 

20-99 employees . . , 

Vermillion: 

0-19 employees . . . , 
20-99 employees . . . 

Vigo: 

0-19 employees 19 

20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 employees . 
250 employees and 
over 

^See table 3, footnote 2. 



126 



84 



20 



18 



39 



15 



12 



15 



INDIANA 



11-15 



Tabic 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


12C^ 


131 1 


132 


138^ 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


14Si 


149 


149 
M 


COUNTIES — Continued 

Wabash: 

0-19 employees 

Warren: 

0-19 eD5)loyees 

Varrlck: 

0-19 employees . 

20-99 enployees... 
100-2-19 eiKployees. 

Washinftdi: 

20-99 eii5)loyees . . . 

Wajne: 

0-19 en5)loyees 

20-99 en^jloyees . . . 

Wells: 

0-19 eii?)loyees .... 

White: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Whitley: 

0-19 enyloyees .... 
20-99 en5)loyees . . . 

Undistrihuted: 

0-19 engjloyees 


5 

2 

U 
3 
3 

1 

2 

1 

2 

1 
1 

1 
1 

54. 


A 

2 

14 
3 
3 

1 

1 

2 

1 
1 

1 
1 

54 


1 


















11 
2 
3 


1 


1 








1 






3 
2 
































































1 


... 


1 














































1 


... 


























































































1 


... 


















2 




























1 


2 




















































































1 


... 










1 
























... 


. . . 


1 








































1 
















































1 
1 
















































































19 




35 



































































^See table 3, footnote 2. 



IOWA 

12-1 



12-2 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES— AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining by County.- 1958 



IOWA 



RANK AA40NG STATES 
EMPLOYMENT -34 
VALUE OF SHIPMENTS -34 



EMPLOYMENT 

8000- 12000 

4000- 7999 — - 

2000 - 3999 — ^ 

1000- 1999 — 

500 - 999 — 

200 - 499 — 

25- 199 — 




(p MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

Q INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 




U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



MINING IN IOWA 

Employment For Industry Group By County: 1958 



12-5 



Coal Mining 




General Extent ot Coal Fields -_-_-_-_-_-_- -_-I 



Nonmetallic Minerals Mining 



^ MINERAL INOUtTRieS 

Q INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURCl 






100 1.000 2.500 5,000 7,500 

Number of Employees 



Employment in Mining 

including Mining in Manufactures:i902-1958 
IOWA 



15 



























































INCLUDED IN _ 


1 





1902 1909 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



1929 

CENSUS YEAR 



1954 1958 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



12-4 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 1— General Statistics for Mineral Operations; 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction. For nore detailed historical statistics for this :3tate, see table 1 of the correspcoding 

chapter of the 1954 Census of Mineral Industries, Vol. II. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 





Establish- 
ments, 
number 






Production 


and 


Value 

added 

in 

($1,000) 


Selected expenses ($1,000) 


Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ^ 

($1,000) 


Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 

($1,000) 


Energy 


used 






development workers 


Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 


Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 


Con- 
tract 
work 


Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
in- 
stalled 


equivalent) 


Kind of operation 
and year 


1 "" 

To- 
tal 


20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 


NuDiber 


Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 


Number 


Man- 
hours 

a,ooo) 


Wages 
($1,000) 


Total 

(mil- 
lion) 


Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 


Mineral industries 
only: 
1958 


293 
329 

335 

364 

5383 

240 

198 

402 

=629 


40 
26 

44 

34 

(M) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


2,914 
2,644 

3,146 
2,974 
5,928 
7,622 

11,834 
17,020 
11,051 


12,520 
9,104 

13,620 

10,505 

6,059 

10,430 

13,810 

11,44^ 

7,292 


^2,457 
2,347 

^2,689 
2,677 
5,589 
7,164 

11,274 

16,542 

'10,439 


5,431 
5,288 

5,884 

6,049 

8,595 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


9,763 
7,894 

10,863 
9,295 
5,489 
9,317 

12,466 

10,898 

6,791 


32,720 
21,513 

41,102 

27,316 

8,963 

14,346 

15,620 

12,296 

8,664 


11,751 
8,585 

=12,936 

=10,395 

1,827 

2,556 

2,821 

1,540 

963 


368 
14 

368 

14 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 


2,113 
1,526 

=2,113 

=1,526 

54 

8 

33 
42 
49 


4,467 
3,731 

^^4,467 

33, 731 

(NA) 

424 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


45,066 
31,564 

54,633 
39,177 
10,844 
16,910 

18,474 

13,878 

9,676 


6,353 
3,805 

"■^6,355 

^3,805 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


682 

^■^9^1 
^682 
201 
758 

81, 622 
(NA) 
(NA) 


^383 


1954 

Including operations 
in manufactures: 

1958 

1954* 


291 

"350 
255 


1939 


36 


1929* 


106 


1919' 


144 


1909'' 


(NA) 


1902'' 


(NA) 







NA Not available. Revised. 

■"•For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishment^ includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of shipments (or production for 1919 and 
1909) and contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one establishment to another for preparation. The approximate magnitude 
of this diflplication is indicated by the figures shown for cost of "Minerals received for preparation." For all other years the figures represent net 
production and excludes this duplication. 

=For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is 
included with the cost of sxqiplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments and for 1958 data 
for dimension stone operations in manufactures . 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'Represents number of mines and quarries. 

'Excludes data for common clay and shale and (except for 1902) peat mining operations. There were 20 such mines in 1939 with products valued at 
$271 thousand. Also, for 1929 and 1919, excludes data for one nonproducing establishment. 

''Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations and stone quarries operated as parts of cement establishments. There were 42 such establish- 
ments in 1929 with products valued at $3,084 thousand. See also footnote' 6. 

'Excludes purchased electricity. For 1939, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to only 3 percent of the total kwh equivalent of energy 
used. 

'Figures for average enjiloyment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments lAich operated for a shorter period. 



IOWA 



12-5 



Tabic 2A.-Gcncral Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captlcjns see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group and industry 



1958 



19iA' 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Total 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All employees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



fl,0OO) 



Production and 
development workers 



Man- 
hours 



Wages 



(1,000) ($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



12 

1211 



14 



1421 



lUl 



1492 



-- 



All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures. 



Bituminous coal mining. 
Bituminous coal 



Nonmetallic minerals mining.. 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures. 



Crushed and broken stone 

(mineral industry only) 

Crushed and broken limestone 
(mineral subindustry only) . . 



Sand and gravel. . . . 
Mineral industry. 



Clay and related minerals: 
Clay and related minerals, 
nee 

Miscellaneous minerals, nee: 
Gypsum (Included in manu- 
factures) 



335 

293 

42 

62 

59 

273 

231 

42 



112 
108 



123 

111 



24 



3,146 

2 914 

*232 



425 
421 

2,721 

2 489 

*232 



1,731 

1,691 

743 
727 

*63 

"^101 



13,620 
12,520 
*1,100 

1,453 
1,436 

12,167 
11,067 
*1,100 



7,807 

7,635 

3,224 
3,170 

*277 

*425 



12,689 

2 457 

^232 



399 
395 

!!2,290 

2 058 

*232 



1,421 

1,386 

627 
611 

*62 

■'lOl 



5,884 

5,431 

453 

771 
765 

5,113 

4,660 

453 



3,300 

3,221 

1,336 
1,309 

120 

202 



10,863 
9,763 
1,100 

1,338 
1,321 

9,525 
8,425 
1,100 



5,725 

5,582 

2,676 
2,622 

275 



425 



41,102 

32,720 

8,382 

3,592 
3,552 

37,510 

29,128 

8,382 



20,383 

20,058 

8,979 
8,546 

871 

4,492 



=19,885 
18,699 
=1,186 

1,841 
1,787 

^18,044 
16,858 
=1,186 



13,535 

13,049 

3,321 
3,237 

=270 

=420 



54,633 
45,066 
*9,567 

4,867 
4,779 

49,766 
40,199 
''9,567 



29,461 

28,689 

10,991 
10,474 

*1,140 

*4,912 



^6,354 
6,353 



566 
560 

^5,788 
5,787 



4,457 

4,418 

(NA) 
1,309 

(NA) 

(NA) 



2,974 

2 644 

^330 

(NA) 
602 

(NA) 
(NA) 
"'330 



'1,399 

1,266 

(NA) 
674 

*87 

(NA) 



27,316 

21,513 

5,803 

(NA) 
3,556 

(NA) 

(NA) 

5,803 



^13,176 

11,266 

(NA) 
6,539 



646 



(NA) 



NA Not available. Revised. 

Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased 
machinery installed. 

^Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the number of production and 
develcpment workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same 
figures are included for production and development workers and for all enployees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes 
the estimated value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment at such operations. 

Includes data for mining operations in inanafacturing establishments. 



Table 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 



(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 





Industry group and industry 


Selected expenses ($1,000) 


Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 


Net shipments of pn'mnry products •"■ 


Ind. 
code 


Total 


Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 


Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 


Con- 
tract 
work 


Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 


Total 


De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 


Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
machin- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment = 


By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 


By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 




Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 


Value 
($1,000) 


Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 


Value 
($1,000) 


12 


*n mineral industries 

R1 tiTnri nniis p.nsl nrining. .,,., ... 


18,699 

1,841 

16,858 
13,535 
13,049 

3,237 


11,751 

971 

10,780 
8,518 
8,068 

2,202 


368 

262 

106 
106 
106 


2,113 
129 

1,984 
1,773 
1,743 

199 


4,467 

479 

3,988 
3,138 
3,132 

836 


6,353 

566 

5,787 
4,457 
4,418 

1,309 


143 

8 

135 
128 
128 

7 


6,210 

558 

5,652 
4,329 
4,290 

1,302 


XXX 

1,261 

XXX 

19,522 
18,748 

9,607 


XXX 

^4,520 

XXX 

27,369 
26,717 

*10,493 


XXX 
XXX 

2,184 
(NA) 

675 


XXX 


14 
1421 

1441 


Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Crushed and broken stone 

Crushed and broken limestone. 

Sand and gravel 


XXX 

3,002 
(NA) 

(*) 



NA Not available. 

^Represents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation. 

=Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment. 

■'Represents the value of net shipments of bituminous coal only. 

■^Figures for the value of primary products shipped in other industries are Included with those for the value of primary products shipped in the 
specified industry. 



12-6 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 



(For explanation of line and column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group or industry 
and item 



All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 



Producing establishments 



Mining only 



Total 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 



Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods ■"■ 



Mines with preparation plants 



Under- 
ground 



Open- 
pit 



Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 



Sepa- 


Nonpro 


rately 


ducing 


oper- 


estab- 


ated 


lish- 


prepa- 


ments 


ration 




plants 





12 



K 



K21 



1441 



All industries: 

Number of establishments, ,. 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Bituminous coal mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Nonmetallic minerals mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of enployees 

Value added in 
mining. $1,000. 

Crushed and broken stone: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Crushed and broken limestone: 
Number of establishments... 

Number of employees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 

Sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments 

Number of enployees 

Value added in 
mining $1,000. 



290 
2,910 

32,680 



59 
421 

3,552 



231 
2,489 

29,128 



112 
1,731 

20,383 



108 
1,691 

20,058 



111 
727 



8,546 



287 
2,908 

32,682 



59 

421 



3,552 



228 
2,487 

29,130 



111 
(D) 



(D) 



108 
1,691 

20,058 



109 
(D) 

(D) 



75 
423 

5,832 



33 

131 

1,050 



42 
423 

5,832 



9 
173 

2,082 



(D) 
(D) 



29 

104 

2,578 



430 



430 



44 

300 

3,602 



620 



27 
250 



2,982 



9 
173 

2,082 



(D) 
(D) 



14 
62 



778 



15 
42 



1,800 



15 
42 

1,800 



212 
2,485 



27,850 



26 
290 

2,502 



186 
2,195 



25,348 



102 
(D) 



15 
42 



1,800 



(D) 



100 
(D) 

(D) 



80 
(D) 

(D) 



12 
153 



598 



11 
(D) 

(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



189 
2,247 

26,324 



14 
149 



1,893 



175 
2,098 



24,431 



100 
1,517 

18,041 



98 
(D) 

(D) 



71 
565 



928 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



10 
(D) 

(D) 



(D) 
(D) 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



9 
(D) 

(D) 



3 
2 



3 
2 



1 
(D) 

(D) 



2 

(D) 

(D) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for Individual companies. 

■"•Includes data for 13 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 
^Includes data for 4 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mimng was not specified. 

"'Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded capital expendi- 
tures. 



IOWA 



12-7 



Table 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954 









(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 














County and industry group 


1958 


1954^ 


Ind. 


Establlshmejits, 
number 


All enployees 


Production and 
development workers 


Value 

added In 

mining 

($1,000) 


Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
Installed 

($1,000) 


Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
celpts^ 

($1,000) 


Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 

($1,000) 


All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 


Value 


code 


Total 


With 20 
or more 
employ- 
ees 


Number 


Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 


Number 


Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 


Wages 
($1,000) 


in 
mining 

($1,000) 


14 


lOVA: 

All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included In manufactures.. 

COUNTIES 

Allamakee 


335 
293 

42 

5 

15 
6 

6 

4 

6 
4 

4 
4 

5 

3 

7 
5 
3 
5 
9 
5 

14 

26 
19 
16 

4 

10 

4 

8 

3 

5 
3 

7 

12 
4 
8 

4 

3 
3 


44 

40 

4 

"3 

3 


3,146 

2,914 

*232 

40 

161 

59 

22 

41 

38 
21 

58 
8 

=14 
36 

186 

23 

26 

15 

162 

162 

77 

205 
158 
154 

31 
53 

75 
124 

49 

545 
44 

44 

140 

23 

5 117 

'101 

17 
31 


13,620 
12,520 
'1,100 

106 

458 

234 

73 
134 

172 
80 

184 
10 

'4^ 
146 

898 
88 

114 

55 

1,079 

765 

273 

885 
670 
653 

135 
142 
279 
571 

278 

=198 
181 

190 

595 

111 

'484 

'425 

90 
55 


!!2,689 

2.457 

5 232 

37 

150 

47 

18 
37 

32 
20 

40 
7 

'14 
33 

159 
21 
25 
13 
69 

153 

69 

188 
147 
143 

18 

51 

58 

110 

42 

'42 
39 

37 

136 

19 

'117 

'101 

14 
17 


5,884 

5,431 

453 

68 

263 

101 

36 
47 

73 
41 

84 
21 

25 
81 

250 
45 
46 
26 

158 

317 

142 

408 
327 
320 

46 

82 

120 

185 

99 

85 
87 

74 

274 

38 

236 

202 

24 
30 


10,863 
9,763 
1,100 

105 

416 

184 

61 
120 

138 

77 

162 

7 

44 
135 

528 
78 

112 
47 

324 

655 

249 

770 
590 
573 

74 
139 
200 
492 

235 

185 
147 

166 

578 

94 

484 

425 

73 
42 


41,102 

32,720 

8,382 

256 

679 

524 

253 
328 

632 
224 

485 
26 

128 
225 

2,590 
202 
474 
124 
768 

2,435 

779 

2,437 
1,890 
1,850 

225 

355 

744 

2,096 

568 

287 
462 

554 

4,738 

137 

4,601 

4,492 

474 
173 


^19,885 
18,699 
^1,186 

204 

685 

418 

217 
258 

272 
146 

169 
12 

^25 
(D) 

1,032 

216 

117 

99 

710 

1,265 

321 

1,329 
947 
893 

286 

44 

412 

852 

328 

^202 
567 

230 

3704 

243 

2461 

3420 

68 
50 


54,633 

45,066 

9,567 

362 

1,243 

822 

435 
524 

754 
282 

545 
35 

213 
381 

3,176 

371 

507 

184 

1,416 

3,600 

971 

3,368 
2,590 
2,502 

369 

325 

1,034 

2,616 

766 

372 
662 

604 

5,369 

307 

5,062 

4,912 

534 
223 


''6,354 

6,353 

*1 

98 

121 

120 

35 
62 

150 
88 

109 
3 

(D) 

446 
47 
84 
39 
62 

100 

129 

398 
247 
241 

142 

74 

122 

332 

130 

"^117 
367 

180 

*73 

73 

(NA) 

(NA) 

8 


2,974 

2,644 

^330 

(NA) 

*191 

91 

26 
(NA) 

'15 
13 

61 

17 

815 
32 

44 
17 
(NA) 
26 
144 
61 

'69 

218 
196 
196 

35 
75 
62 
89 

52 

(NA) 
65 

(NA) 

(NA) 

18 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
25 


27, 316 

21,513 

5,803 

(NA) 




^panoose (mineral indus- 
tries only) 


^563 


14 


Black Hawk (mineral indus- 
tries only) 


481 


14 


Butler (mineral industries 
only) 


154 


14 


Clayton 


(NA) 


14 


Dallas (mineral industries 
only) 


'75 


14 


Delaware 


131 


14 


Dubuque (mineral industries 
only) 


479 


14 


Fayette 


117 


14 


Franklin (including oper- 
ations in manufactures) 

Greene 


8219 
407 


14 


Hardin (mineral industries 
only) 


525 


14 


Jackson 


122 


14 
14 


Jasper 

Jones 


(NA) 
118 


14 


Linn 


1,349 


14 


Madison 


528 




Mahaska (mineral industries 
only) , 


'623 




Marion 


2,010 


12 


Bituminous coal mining 

PituTninoup paaI 


1,684 
1,684 


14 


Mitchell 


143 


12 


Monroe 


320 


14 


Muscatine 


686 


14 


Polk (mineral industries only) 
Scott (mineral industries 

only) 

Story (including operations 

in manufactures) 

Van Buren 


997 

423 

(NA) 
340 




Wapello (mineral industries 
only) 

Wehster, total 


(NA) 
(NA) 


14 


Mineral industri es 


161 




Included in manufactures .... 
C^sum 


(NA) 
(MA) 


14 
14 


Woodbury (mineral industries 

only) 

Worth 


(NA) 
129 









D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. Revised. 

NA Not available. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsiim mining operations in manufacturing establishments, includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment. 

^or crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased 
machinery installed, 

''Excludes data for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'see table 2A, footnote 4. 

Represents bituminous coal mining only, 

'includes data for operations in manufacturing industries, 

Represents mineral industries only. 



12-8 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Gold and silver ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 Metal mining services 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 
120 Bituminous coal 



12C Coal TTrlning services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

141 Dimension stcme 

lAlM Dimension stone in manufactures 

14-2 Crushed and broken stone 

1A2M Crushed and brolien stone in manufactures 

144 Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel in manufaoturee 

145 Clay and related minerals 

145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer minerals 

148 Nonmetallic minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c., in 

manufactures 



(Counties and size classes In which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108 


109 


120 


12C 


131 


132 


138 


141 


141 

M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 

M 


147 


148 


149 


149 
M 




335 

31 

125 

76 

59 

41 
2 

1 

2 

1 

4 

1 

15 

1 

3 
1 

6 

1 

3 

1 

3 
2 
2 
7 
2 
2 
2 

4 

1 

3 

1 


293 

26 
100 

71 

56 
38 

1 
1 

2 

1 

4 

1 

14 

1 

2 

1 

5 

1 

3 

1 

3 
2 
2 
6 
2 
2 
2 

3 

1 


42 

5 

25 

5 

3 
3 

1 


















59 

9 
20 
18 

10 

1 
1 

11 

1 


3 

1 
2 


... 


... 


... 


2 


1 


112 

8 
27 
16 

30 
30 


3 

2 
1 


111 

6 
48 
35 

15 
7 


12 

3 

9 


4 

1 
2 
1 


22 

2 

16 
3 

1 


• • • 


• • • 


2 

1 

"l 


4 


No enployees 

0-4 enployees 




































... 


... 


... 


1 


1 




5-9 enployees 

10-19 employees... 


















1 




















... 


... 


1 




20-49 engjloyees. . . 


















2 


50-99 employees... 








































1 


100-249 engjloyees. 




























1 

2 

1 

1 
1 

3 


... 


















COUNTIES 

Adair: 

20-99 engjloyees. . . 














































Adams: 

0-19 employees,... 














































Allamakee: 

0-19 employees .... 






























3 
















20-99 enployees. . . 












































^panoose: 

0-19 enployees . . , . 


1 




























. * ■ 


■ ■ ■ 




1 










20-99 enployees . . . 






























Benton: 

0-19 enployees .... 


1 




























1 
1 

1 
1 


... 


1 


... 




1 










20-99 employees . . . 






























Black Hawk: 

0-19 en^iloyees. . . , 


1 




























4 


1 














20-99 employees . . . 








































Boone: 

0-19 employees .... 






























2 

1 

1 




1 












20-99 employees... 




































Bremer: 

0-19 enployees. . . . 

Buchanan: 

0-19 employees .... 

Buena Vista: 






























2 
2 


... 






















































































2 
2 
2 

1 
1 
















Butler: 

0-19 enployees.... 

Carroll: 

0-19 employees .... 

Cass: 

0-19 employees .... 

Cedar: 

0-19 enployees. 

Cerro Gordo: 

0-19 enployees .... 


1 




























4 


... 


1 
















































































1 
1 


1 
1 


























































4 
1 
































3 










20-99 enployees... 
Cherokee: 




























































3 
















Chickasaw: 

0-19 enployees .... 






























1 



















IOWA 



12-9 



Table 4 —Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties; 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries 



In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by Industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



10^ 



105 



106 



108 



109 



120 



U2C 



131 



132 



138 



141 



142 



144 



145 



147 



14S 



149 



149 
M 



COUNTIES — Continued 

Clarke: 

0-19 enployees . . , , 
20-99 eiiployees... 

Clay: 

0-19 enjjloyees . . . . 

Clayton: 

0-19 eii5)loyees . . . . 
20-99 eii5)loyees . . . 

Clinton: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 
20-99 enployees . . . 

Crawford: 

0-19 en^jloyees . . . . 

Dallas: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 

Davis: 

0-19 engjloyees .... 

Decatur: 

0-19 en|)loyees .... 

Delaware: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Des Moines: 
0-19 enployees .... 

DieVinson: 

0-19 en^jloyees 

Dubuque: 

0-19 enployees .... 
20-99 employees 

Emmet: 

0-19 engjloyees .... 

Fayette: 

0-19 employees.... 

Floyd: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Franklin: 

0-19 enjiloyees .... 

Fremont : 

0-19 engjloyees .... 
20-99 enployees 

Greene: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Grundy: 

20-99 enployees . . . 

Guthrie: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Hamilton: 

20-99 enployees . . . 

Hancock: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Hardin: 

0-19 enployees 

20-99 employees . . . 
100-249 enployees. 

Harrison: 

20-99 employees 



12-10 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All niineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries 



In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



10<i 



105 



106 



108 



109 



120 



120 



131 



138 



Wl 



l<i2 



14A 



U5 



147 



1A8 



COUNTIES — Continued 

Henry: 

0-19 employees.... 

Howard: 

0-19 employees .... 

Humboldt : 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Iowa: 

0-19 employees . . . . 

Jackson: 

0-19 en5)loyees. . . . 

Jasper: 

0-19 eaployees. . . . 

Jefferson: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Johnson: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 en5)loyees. .. 

Jones: 

0-19 employees .... 

Keokuk: 

0-19 employees .... 

Lee: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 enployees . . . 

Linn: 

0-19 enployees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Louisa: 

0-19 employees . . . . 
20-99 employees... 

Lucas : 

0-19 employees .... 

Madison: 

0-19 enployees , . . . 
20-99 employees . , . 

Mahaska: 

0-19 employees . . . . 

Marion: 

0-19 eitployees .... 
20-99 enployees . . . 

Marshall: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Mitchell: 

0-19 employees . . . . 

Monona: 

0-19 employees . . . . 

Monroe: 

0-19 employees.... 

Montgomery: 

0-19 employees.... 

Muscatine: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 
20-99 enployees . , . 



15 



10 



U 



10 



12 



10 



IOWA 



12-11 



Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 19 58— Continued 

(Counties and size classes Ixi which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries 



In- 
cluded 

In 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



104 



105 



106 



108 



109 



120 



12C 



131 



132 



138 



Wl 



U2 



144 



145 



147 



148 



149 



149 
M 



COUNTIES— Continued 

O'Brien: 

0-19 eii5)loyees . . . . 

Osceola: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 

Palo Alto: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 

Plymouth: 

0-19 esployees . . . . 

Pocahontas: 

20-99 enployees . . . 

Poli: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 
20-99 enployees . . . 

Pottawattamie: 

0-19 enjiloyees . , . . 
20-99 eiployees . . . 

Sac: 

0-19 enployees . . . . 

Scott: 

0-19 enployees .... 
20-99 enfiloyees . . . 

Sioux: 

0-19 enployees .... 
20-99 eiployees . . . 

Story: 

0-19 enjjloyees . . . . 
20-99 employees . . . 

Tama: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Taylor: 

0-19 employees .... 

Van Buren: 

0-19 eiployees .... 
20-99 enfiloyees . . . 

Wapello: 

0-19 employees.... 

Warren: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Washington: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Wayne: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Webster: 

0-19 enjjloyees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

rfinnebago: 
0-19 enjjloyees .... 

ifinneshiek: 
-19 enployees .... 

iToodbury: 
0-19 enployees .... 

forth: 
0-19 en5>loyees .... 



KANSAS 

13-1 



13-2 



MINERAL. INDUSTRIES- -AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining by County.- 1958 

KANSAS 



RANK AMONG STATES 
EMPLOYMENT - 13 
VALUE OF SHIPMENTS- 9 



qp MINERAL INDUSTRIES 

Q INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 




EMPLOYMENT 

8000 - 12000 

4000- 7999 

2000- 3999 — ^ 

1000- 1999 — - 

500 - 999 — 

200 - 499 — 

25- 199 — 




BARTON 



© 



RICE 



© 1 

SALINE 



MCPHERSON 



WASHINGTON 



ir 



© 



SEDGWICK 



COWLEY 

o 



GREENWOOD 



© 



CHAUTAUQUA 




© 

WILS0^ 

O 



MONTGOMERY 



© 



© 



© 



© 

CHEROKEE 



SCALE 
O 10 20 30 40 50 MILES 



U. S. DEPARTMENT OF CO^^MERCE 
BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



MINING IN KANSAS 

Employment For Industry Group By County: 1958 



13-3 





Metal Mining 








— -^ 




1 








— ' 










^ 




















Jh 












^ 


U 




1 1 








1 








1 
1 






' — 1 


( 








1 






L 








j> 




1 


1 






. 


































• 


1 








- 








™ 


1 

































Coal Mining 

















- 


yi-i- 




^ 

^ 
















(j; 


-i-i- : 




z^^. 


»f-; 










-4 ^ 


W. 


'^^^: 












>^ 


-:3C-: 














- 


m 






























iRrC 


E>> 


-BE-q 



General Extent of Coal Fields 



Oil and Gas Extraction 




General Extent of Oil and Gas Fields 



Nonmetatlic Minerals Mining 




0HINERAL INDUSTRIES 
O'NCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES 




U. S. DEPARTMENT OF COMMEBCE 



100 1,000 2.500 5.000 7.500 

Number of £mp/q/ees 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



13-4 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining 

including IViining in IVIanufactures: 1902- 1958 
KANSAS 



20 



15 



10 



1902 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



1909 



Hii 



OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION 
(Not available for 1929) 

NONMETALLIC MINERALS MINING 

METAL MINING 

COAL MINING 



INCLUDED IN MANUFACTURES - 




1919 1929 

CENSUS YEAR 



1939 



195^ 1958 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



KANSAS 



13-5 



Tabic l.-Gcncral Statistics for Mineral Operations: 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of colunm captions see Introduction. For nore detailed historical statistics for this 6tate, see table 1 of the corresponding 
chapter of the 1954 Census of Mineral Industries, Vol. II. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 



Kind of operation 
and year 



Mineral industries 
only: 

1958 

1954 



Including operations 
in manufactures: 
All operations: 

1958 

1954' 

1939* 

1919* 

1909* 

1902^° 

Excluding oil and 
gas extraction 
Industries : 

1958 

1954' 

1939 

1929" , 

1919* , 

1909* , 

1902^° 



Establish- 
nents, 
number 



To- 
tal 



1,599 
1.661 



1,632 

1,689 

'956 

827 

692 

■^462 



237 
296 

■^216 
261 
204 
475 

'393 



20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploye 
ees 



189 
216 



194 
221 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



34 
37 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



All enployees 



Number 



15,776 
17,659 



16,069 
18,046 
15,479 
17,954 
15,044 
9,326 



2,130 
3,032 
5,515 
7,689 
10,456 
13,756 
9,004 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



73,028 
70,729 



74,161 
71,983 
20,125 
25,356 
10,339 
6,230 



10,053 
U.,.621 
5,597 
9,493 
13,529 
9,519 
5,992 



Production and 
developmRnt workers 



Number 



12,603 
14,948 



12,887 
15,329 
13,827 
16,193 
14,357 
■^8,745 



1,768 
2,623 
5,159 
7,297 
9,885 
13,332 
1^8.499 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



■25,073 
30,001 



■25,596 

30,768 

23,240 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



"^^3,686 
5,648 
9,264 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



53,455 
56.892 



54,559 
58,130 
16,241 
22,022 
9,650 
5,697 



7,941 
9,690 
4,903 
8,465 
12,398 
9,134 
5,522 



Value 

added 

in 

mining 



($1,000) 



378,353 
358.699 



384,888 

362,804 

68,518 

48,394 

16,004 

8,924 



25,396 
25,746 
11,158 
17,263 
17,528 
10,738 
8,477 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 
elec- 
tricity 



77,617 
68,415 



^78,525 

^69,605 

8,145 

37,583 

1,928 

1,465 



^6,955 
^8,682 
3,302 
4,987 
4,174 
1,075 
1,002 



Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 



56,074 
=2,884 



56,074 

=2,914 

(NA) 

298 

393 

(NA) 



13 
1,304 
(NA) 
(NA) 
11 
123 
(NA) 



Con- 
tract 
work 



56,079 
64,604 



^56,081 

^64,636 

12,418 

4,063 

398 

311 



3686 
^1,086 
74 
214 
110 
105 
104 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery 
Iji- 
atalled 



31,903 
44,696 



*31,911 
*44,721 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



'*2,132 
*2,459 
(NA) 
980 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ^ 



($1,000) 



532,690 
456,067 



540,135 
461,400 
89,081 
90,338 
18,723 
10,700 



32,696 
36,939 
14,534 
22,464 
21,823 
12,041 
9,583 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



67,336 
83,231 



■^67,344 
*83,280 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



*2,486 
*2,338 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 



Energy used 

(kwh 
equivalent) 



Total 

(mil- 
lion) 



10,829 
11,832 



10,833 

'^11,839 

3,829 

5,327 

(NA) 

(NA) 



^378 

*950 

429 

740 

'1,740 

(NA) 

(NA) 



Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 



792 



772 

277 

329 

(NA) 

(NA) 



^214 
362 
83 
101 
176 
(NA) 
(NA) 



NA Not available. Revised. 

■'■For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments includes the estimated value of 
minerals produced and used in the same establishment. For 1958, 1954, 1919, and 1909, represents gross value of shipments (or production for 1919 and 
1909) and contains some duplication due to the transfer of crude minerals from one es'tablishment to another for preparation. The approximate magnitude 
of this dv^jlication is indicated by the figxires shown for cost of minerals received for preparation. For other years, represents net production and 
excludes this duplication. For years prior to 1958 excludes the value of residue gas from natural gas liquids plants. 

^Excludes the cost of natural gas received for processing, but includes the estimated value prior to nrocessing of natural gas liquids contained in 
such gas. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the cost of contract work is 
included with the cost of supplies, purchases for resale, and purchased fuels and electricity. 

^Excludes data for criished and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Includes data for 4 or less machine-shop contractors with receipts for services amounting to less than $227 thousand. Such contractors were not 
Included in -the 1958 and 1954 minerals censuses. 

'Represents number of mines and quarries, number of natural gas liquids plants, and, for crude petroleum and natural gas and mining ser-rices indus- 
tries, number Of operating conpanies. 

*Excludes data for sand, gravel, common clay, and shale mining operations and for stone quarries operated as parts of cement and lime plants. In 
1939, there were 54 such mining operations with products valued at $1,235 thousand. 

'Excludes purchased electricity. For "All operations" in 1939, the quantity of purchased electricity amounted to only 2 percent of the totah kwh 
equivalent of energy used; and for "Excluding oil and gas extraction industries" In 1929, to 9 percent. 

'■"includes data for 2 cement plants and for lime plants producing lime valued at $7 thousand. 

■'■■'■Figures for average enployment were converted to a 300-day basis for establishments which operated for a shorter period. 

■'^Excludes data for one nonproduclng operation. 



13-6 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2A.— General Statistics for Mineral Operations, by Industry Group and Industry: 1958 and 1954 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



1958 



Establish- 
ments, number 



Industry group and industry 



Total 



With 
20 or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 



($1,000) 



Production and 
development vrorkers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added In 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 



($1,000) 



Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
nuniber 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



10 



lai 



13 

1311 

1321 

138 

1381 

1382 

1389 



U 



1421 



1441 



All mineral operations 

Mineral indiistries 

Included in manufactures.... 

Metal mining 

Bituminous coal mining 
( Bituminous coal) 

Oil and gas extraction „ 

Crude petroleum and natural gas. 

Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services 

Drilling oil and gas welis .... 

Oil and gas exploration 
services. 

Oil and gas field services, nee 

Nonmetallic minerals mining 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures 

Crushed and broken stone 

Mineral industry .,., 

Included in manuf actixres . . . . 
Crushed and broken limestone 

(mineral subindustry only) . . . 
Crushed and .broken stone, neo 

(mineral subindustry only) . . . 

Sand and gravel 

Mineral industry 

Clay and related minerals 

Clay and related minerals, nee 



1,632 

1,599 

33 

17 



20 

1,395 

905 

15 

475 

233 

15 
227 

200 

167 

33 

66 

58 



54 



101 
96 

17 
14 



194 

189 

5 



160 

105 

7 

48 

31 

2 

15 

31 
26 

5 
19 
17 

2 

16 



16,069 

15 776 

5293 



54 



252 

13,939 

9,370 

328 

4,241 

2,570 

188 
1,483 

1,824 

1 531 

^293 

901 

796 

^105 

744 

52 



512 

^75 
359 



74,161 
73,028 
^1,133 

262 



1,507 

64,108 
44,634 
1,882 
17,592 
10,891 

997 
5,704 

8,284 
7,151 
^1,133 
4,170 
3 697 
^473 

3,481 

216 

^2,494 

2,299 

3339 

^266 



12,887 

12,603 

=284 



35 



204 

11,119 

7,068 

275 

3,776 

2,248 

170 
1,358 

1,529 

1,245 

3284 

788 

683 

^105 

639 

44 

3459 
412 

^66 

350 



■25,596 

'25,073 

523 

^86 



312 

21,910 

13,641 

549 

7,720 

4,486 

350 
2,884 

3,288 
2,765 

523 
1,738 
1,527 

211 

1,424 

103 

1,018 
924 

143 

108 



54, 559 

53,455 

1,104 

172 



1,C 

46,618 
30,085 

1,533 
15,000 

9,032 

861 

5,107 

6,681 
5,577 
1,104 
3,533 
3,060 
473 

2,874 

186 

2,069 
1,874 

295 
222 



384,888 

378,353 

6,535 

204 



2,638 

359,492 

312,879 

11,788 

34,825 

22,063 

1,756 
11,006 

22,554 

16,019 

6,535 

11,656 

8,562 

3,094 

8,159 

403 

6,321 
5,306 

1,495 
1,039 



^222, 591 

221,673 

=918 

258 



947 

212,805 

135,105 

57,460 

20,240 

14, 287 

1,242 
4,711 



=8,581 

7,663 

^918 

=5,104 
4,734 



370 



4,345 



(D) 

=2,414 
2,314 

=397 
=309 



^540, 135 

532,690 

37,445 

453 



3,354 

507,439 

387,950 

68,630 

50,859 

33,260 

2,931 
14,668 

328,889 
21,4W 
37,445 

315,458 
11,994 
33,464 

11,254 

740 

37,889 
6,774 

3l,849 
3l,305 



"^67,344. 
67,336 



231 

64,858 

60,034 

618 

4,206 

3,090 

67 
1,049 

■^2,246 

2,238 

^8 

*1,302 

1,302 

(NA) 

1,250 

(D) 

■^846 
846 

*43 
(NA) 



18,046 

17,659 

3387 



381 



497 

15,014 

9,238 

(NA) 

(NA) 

3,650 

179 
(NA) 

2,154 

1,767 

3387 

1,015 

797 

218 

761 

36 

(NA) 
668 

(NA) 
387 



362,804 

358,699 

4,105 

2,206 



4,271 

337,058 

285,117 

(NA) 

(NA) 

34,353 

1,611 
(NA) 

19,269 
15,164 
4,105 
8,743 
6,518 
2,225 

6,197 

321 

(NA) 
5,529 

(NA) 
805 



I 



i 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual conpanles. 

NA Not available. ■'"Revised. 

■"■Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

=For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased 
machinery installed. 

^For crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, the number of production and 
development workers was estimated from reported figures for man-hours. No data were obtained on other employees at such operations, hence, the same 
figures are included for production and development workers and for all enployees at such operations. For value of shipments and receipts, includes 
the estimated value of minerals produced and used in the same establishment. 

'^'Excludes figures for crushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 



KANSAS 



13-7 



Tabic 2B.— Selected Expenditures and Net Shipments of Primary Products of Mineral Industries for Industry 

Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



Industry group and industry 



Selected expenses ($1,000) 



Total 



Supplies, 
pur- 
chases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels 

and 
elec- 
tricity 



Miner- 
als re- 
ceived 
for 
prepa- 
ration 



Con- 
tract 
work 



Pur- 
chased 
machin- 
ery in- 
stalled 



Capital expenditures 
($1,000) 



Total 



De- 
velop- 
ment 
and ex- 
plora- 
tion of 
mineral 
prop- 
erty 



Plant 

and 
other 
con- 
struc- 
tion, 
macliln- 
ery, and 
equip- 
ment^ 



Net shipments of primary products-' 



By establish- 
ments classified 
in the industry 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



By establishments 
classified in other 
mineral industries 
and in manufactur- 
ing industries 



Quantity 

(1,000 
short 
tons) 



Value 



($1,000) 



13 

13U 

1321 

138 

1381 

1389 



14 

U21 



1441 



All mineral industries 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and natural gas 

Natural gas liquids 

Oil and gas field services 

Drilling oil and gas wells . , . 
Oil and gas field services, 
nee 

Noninetallic minerals mining, . , , , , 

Crushed and broken stone 

Crushed and broken limestone. 

Sand and gravel 



221,673 

212,805 

135,105 

57,460 

20,240 

14,287 

4,7U 

7,663 
4,734 
4,345 

2,314 



77,617 

71,570 
56,621 

1,053 
13,896 

9,549 

3,652 

5,074 
3,200 
2,913 

1,376 



56,074 
56,061 
56,061 



56,079 

55,395 

52,256 

189 

2,950 

2,343 

121 

677 
413 
372 

196 



31,903 

29,779 

26,228 

157 

3,394 

2,395 

938 

1,899 
1,108 
1,060 

742 



67,336 

64,858 

60,034 

618 

4,206 

3,090 

1,049 

2,238 
1,302 
1,250 

846 



27,893 

27,839 
27,475 

364 
362 



39,443 

37,019 

32,559 

618 

3,842 

2,728 

1,047 

2,189 
1,282 
1,230 

821 



XXX 

^108,788 
*5,177 

XXX 
XXX 



XXX 

8,762 
8,360 

7,585 



XXX 

■'379 ,417 
^10,957 

XXX 

■^ 33, 974 
■^14,385 

XXX 

11,824 
11,097 

■^7,417 



^1,065 

XXX 
XXX 



XXX 

82,589 
=2,649 

=1,442 



'3,541 

XXX 

C) 

XXX 

'3,478 
145 

n 



■"■Represents gross shipments of the mineral indicated by the industry name less minerals transferred to other establishments for preparation or less 
minerals received from other establishments for preparation, 

^Represents expenditures during the year for both new and used plant and equipment, 

Represents thousands of barrels of crude petroleum, field condensate, and drips shipped or used. In addition, 524,531 million cubic feet of 
natural gas were shipped by establishments classified in the Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas Industry and 4,165 million c^ubic feet by establishments 
classified in other industries, 

^Represents $319,628 thousand for shipments of cmide petroleum, field condensate, and drips and $59,789 thousand for shipments of natural gas. 

'Represents $3,109 thousand for shipments of crude petroleum, field condensate, and drips and $432 -thousand for shipments of natural gas. 

^Represents ne^t shipments of natural gas liquids only. 

''Figures for primary products or ser^vices performed in other industries are included ■with those for primary products or ser-vices performed in the 
specified industry. For Sand and Gravel Industry, see also footnote 8. 

^Includes data for minerals produced and used in the same establishment in making manufactured products. The value of such minerals was estimated. 



13-8 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 2C.— Number of Establishments, Employment, and Value Added in Mining for Mineral Industries, 
Except Service Industries, by Type of Operation for Industry Groups and Selected Industries: 1958 

(For explanation of line and eoluiiin captions see Introduction) 





Industry group or industry 
and item 


All types 
of estab- 
lish- 
ments, 
total 


Producing establishments 






Total 


Mining only 


rilnes 


with preparation plants 


Sepa- 
rately 
oper- 
ated 
prepa- 
ration 
plants 


Nonpro- 
ducing 
estab- 
lish- 
ments 


Ind. 
code 


Total 


Under- 
ground 
mines 


Open- 
pit 
mines 


Combina- 
tion 
methods, 
well op- 
erations, 
and other 
methods'- 


Total 


Under- 
ground 
mines 


Open- 
pit 
mines 


Combi- 
nation 
methods 
and 
other 
methods^ 




All establishments: 

Number of establishments..,. 


1,124 
11,535 

343,528 

920 

9,698 

324,667 

167 

1,531 

16,019 

58 
796 

8,562 

96 
512 

5,306 


1,082 
11,477 

344,328 

887 

9,657 

325,423 

163 
(D) 
(D) 

58 
796 

8,562 

96 
512 

5,306 


925 
9,497 

315,491 

872 

9,329 

313,635 

30 

74 

1,007 

4 
26 

363 

23 
35 

505 


11 
38 

268 


31 
107 

1,267 

19 

51 

686 

4 
26 

363 

12 
12 

184 


883 
9,352 

313,956 

872 

9,329 

313,635 

11 

23 

321 

11 
23 

321 


140 
^1,652 

^17,049 

131 
(D) 
(D) 

52 
(D) 

(D) 

73 
477 

4,801 


8 
3324 

^3,098 

6 
(D) 
(D) 

4 
(D) 

(D) 


103 
1,068 

11,205 

96 

894 

9,206 

48 
643 

6,755 

44 
217 

2,055 


29 
260 

2,746 

29 

260 

2,746 

29 
260 

2,746 


17 
^328 

^11,788 

15 

328 

11,783 

2 

(D) 
(D) 

2 

(D) 

(D) 


42 
58 




Value added in 
mining $1,000.. 


33 

41 


13 


Oil and gas extraction: 

Number of establishments 

Number of enployees .,.,.,,,.,,., 


14 


Value added in mining... $1, 000. . 

Nonmetallic minerals mining: 

Number of establishments 

Number of enployees 


4 
(D) 


1421 


Value added in mining... $1,000.. 

Crushed and broken stone: 

Number of establishments 

Number of employees 


(D) 


1441 


Value added in 
mining $1,000.. 

Sand and gravel: 

Number of establishments 

Number of enployees 


... 




Value added in 
mining $1,000. , 











D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual conpanies. 

■"•Includes data for 10 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified. 

^Includes data for 2 sand and gravel establishments for which the method of mining was not specified, 

^Figures for 2 separately operated preparation plants in the Crushed and Broken Stone Industry are combined with those for underground mines with 
preparation plants. 

^Not shown since the cost of supplies, purchased fuels and electricity, contract work, and purchased machinery installed exceeded capital expendi- 
tures. 



I 



\ 



KANSAS 



13-9 



Table 3— General Statistics 

(For 



by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 

explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



1954 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 
or Bore 
employ- 
ees 



All enployees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
purchased 
machinery 
installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



195^=^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added 

iji 

mining 

($1,000) 



See 



KANSAS: 

All mineral operations 

Mineral industries 

Included in manufactures.. 

COUNTIES 

Allen (mineral industries 

only) 

Crude petroleum and natural 
gas 

Anderson 

Cinide petroleum and natural 
gas 

Barber (mineral industries 

only) 

Crude petroleum and natural 
gas 

Barton (mineral industries 

only) 

Oil and gas extraction, 
total 

Crude petroleum and 

natural gas 

Oil and gas field services 

Bourbon (including operations 
in manufactures ) 

Butler, total 

Crude petroleum and 

natural gas 

Oil and gas field services 

Chase 

Chautauqua, 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Cherokee (mineral indxistries 
only) 

Cheyenne 

Clark 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Clay 

Coffey 

Comanche 

Cowley (mineral industries 
only) 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Oil and gas field services 

Crawford: 

Including oil and gas 

extraction 

Excluding oil and gas 

extraction 

Decatur 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Dickinson 

Edwards 

Eli 

Ellis 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Ellsworth 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Finney 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

footnotes at end of table. 



1,632 

1,599 

33 



37 

25 
29 

U 

86 
48 

382 
376 

263 

U3 

7 
218 

177 
41 

12 

66 

53 

22 

4 

22 

13 
7 

20 
7 

135 

88 
43 

25 

10 
13 

9 

14 

31 

28 

383 

290 

74 

46 
45 

27 



194 

189 

5 



16,069 

15 776 

*293 



146 

104 
132 

93 

384 

211 

1,715 

1,675 

1,074 
601 

*36 
1,038 

714 
324 

8 

196 

156 

179 

3 

36 

27 
53 
17 
13 

531 

280 
214 

192 

162 
24 

23 
55 
59 
74 
681 

424 
248 

133 

173 

65 



74,161 
73,028 
*1,133 



668 

492 
581 

1,742 
997 

7,790 

7,572 

5,077 
2,495 

*115 
4,726 

3,381 
1,345 

37 

900 

737 

988 

14 

165 

128 
24 
78 
54 

2,373 
1,324 



1,072 

904 
113 

109 
233 
240 
376 
3,071 

2,004 
1,129 

629 

780 

323 



12,887 

12 603 

*284 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

149 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

116 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



25,596 

'25,073 

523 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

238 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

226 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



54,559 

53,455 

1,104 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

827 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

559 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



384,888 

378,353 

6,535 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

2,093 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

1,046 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



^222,591 

221,673 

^918 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(D) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

447 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



*540,135 

532,690 

*7,445 



2,090 

1,364 
1,408 

1,138 

10,048 
6,315 

48,106 

47,238 

39,567 
7,671 

*335 
24,286 

21,310 
2,976 

439 

2,765 

2,364 

2,915 

78 

1,682 

1,384 
514 
292 

211 

14,342 

10,926 
2,881 

1,498 

1,339 
1,191 

1,167 

837 

1,099 

1,960 

29,381 

25,606 
6,789 

5,661 
12,733 

5,381 



'67,344 
67,336 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(D) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

154 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



18,046 

17,659 

^387 



(NA) 

152 
*156 

108 

*103 
(NA) 

*1,200 

(NA) 

1,177 
(NA) 

6 '40 
*892 

857 
(NA) 

(NA) 

6223 

(NA) 

612 

(NA) 

6l5 

15 

20 

*47 

(NA) 

455 

417 
(NA) 

* ■'204 

(NA) 
*10 

10 
658 
«11 

98 
^471 

(NA) 
*274 

188 
^83 



362,804 

358,699 

4,105 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(HA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

4,325 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
139 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(HA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



13-10 MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 

Table 3.— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954-Continued 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



County and Industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 

or more 

enploy- 

ees 



All enployefi's 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc . and 
purchased 
machlnei-y 
installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



195A" 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added 

in 

($1,000) 



lA 



13 

13 

131 

138 

13 
131 

132 

13 
131 

138 



13 
131 



131 

13 
13 

131 

13 
131 

13 



138 

131 
131 

13 
131 

138 

131 

13 
131 



See 



COUNTIES— Continued 

Ford 

Franklin 

Nonmetallic mineral mining. . 

Geary (mineral industries 
only) 

Gove 

Graham, total 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Oil and gas field services 

Grant 

Crude petroleum and 

natural gas 

Natural gas liquids 

Greenwood, total 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Oil and gas field services 

Hamilton 

Harper 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Harvey 

Haskell 

Crude petroleum end 
natural gas 

Hodgeman 

Kearny 

Kingman 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas „ 

Kiowa 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Labette 

Leavenworth 

Linn 

Logan 

Ijron 

Mcpherson (mineral industries 

only) 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Marion 

Crude petroleum and 
natiiral gas 

Marshall (mineral industries 
only) 

Meade, total 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Oil and gas field services 

Miami 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Montgomery (mineral industries 

only) 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Morris 

footnotes at end of table. 



6 

7 

180 

111 
69 

27 

18 
3 

138 

109 
29 



51, 

27 
Ul 

31 

13 
25 
82 

43 
40 

23 
12 

5 
13 

3 
13 

153 

99 
96 

58 

3 
45 

25 
20 

28 
19 

65 

51 
17 



23 

105 
58 



68 

2 

343 

214 
129 

256 

78 
93 

663 

487 
176 

19 

233 

108 
60 
36 

28 

17 

59 

157 

104 
96 

59 
30 
65 
15 
5 
33 

371 

213 
248 

138 

27 
112 

73 
39 

96 
58 

218 

118 
32 



70 

526 
299 



321 

9 

1,548 

1,012 
536 

1,305 

369 
583 

3,033 

2,302 
731 

84 

1,070 

511 
274 
167 

132 

76 

281 

731 

492 
433 

279 
139 
304 
58 
21 
142 

1,657 

1,007 
1,111 

652 

111 
507 

345 
162 

416 
274 

973 

558 
126 



(NA) 

(NA) 
50 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
71 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
60 
(NA) 
(M) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA; 
122 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
143 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
123 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 
250 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
422 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
■(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
261 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 
1,268 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
5,686 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
606 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(D) 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
7,683 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
387 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



319 

2,548 
1,617 



987 

49 
21,022 

18,230 
2,792 

30,728 

17,245 
13, 261 

20,861 

18,573 
2,288 

289 

6,528 

3,086 

1,447 
3,547 

3,132 

790 

12,869 

8,096 

7,176 
3,238 

2,750 
401 
873 
267 
55 
614 

12,812 

10,780 
8,226 

6,066 

505 
4,000 

2,861 
1,139 

1,611 
1,365 

1,860 

1,352 
947 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(D) 



(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
108 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
120 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



^21 



»36 
(NA) 
*179 

179 
(NA) 

^156 

47 
109 

*626 

626 
(NA) 

(NA) 

*24 

24 
653 

«11 

(NA) 

(NA) 

639 

«83 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
*26 

(NA) 
679 

(NA) 



"255 

(NA) 
^122 

(NA) 

(NA) 
6 945 

(NA) 
(NA) 

*106 

(NA) 

5 9175 

(NA) 
*13 



(NA) 

(NA) 
428 



B225 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
3,145 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



KANSAS 



13-11 



Tabic 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954— Continued 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



Total 



With 20 

or more 

enploy- 

ees 



All employees 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
Installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



1954^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
number 



Value 

added 

In 

mining 

($1,000) 



13 
131 



13 
131 

138 
131 
13 

131 

131 

131 

131 

132 
& U 

13 
131 

131 

13 
131 

13 
131 

138 
13 

131 

138 
10, 
132, 
& 14 

131 
138 

131 
13 



C»UNTIES — Continued 

Morton 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 



Nemaha 

Neosho (mineral industries only) 

Ness, total 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Oil and gas field services 

Norton 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Osborne 



Pawnee (mineral industries 

only) 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 



Phillips 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Pottawatomie 



Pratt 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Rawlins 



Reno 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

} Natural gas liquids and 
Nonmetalllc minerals mining 

Rice 

Oil and gas extraction 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Riley (including operations 
in manufactures ) 

Rooks 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Rush 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Russell, total 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Oil and gas field services 

Saline 

Scott 

Sedgwick (mineral industries 
only), total 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Oil and gas field services.. 

Metal mining. Natural gas 
liquids, and Nonmetalllc 
minerals mining 

Seward: 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Oil and gas field services 

Shawnee (mineral Industries 
only) 



} 



Sheridan 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 



Sherman 

footnotes at end of table. 



18 

5 
53 

41 

18 
23 

27 

14 
9 

124 

97 
35 

23 

3 

72 

36 
7 

81 

41 



162 
156 

99 

5 

125 

72 
46 

27 
240 

168 
72 

37 



150 



18 



57 

22 

19 

104 

90 

17 
73 

45 

12 

5 

105 



92 

80 

7 

230 

111 

18 

260 

114 

129 

471 
443 

365 

*42 
434 

310 
62 

29 
710 

503 
207 

65 

24 

1,081 

876 
113 

92 



249 

104 

76 
469 
383 

80 
303 

174 

57 
24 

471 

321 
421 

378 

14 

1,015 

525 

75 

1,383 

539 

773 

2,188 
2,055 

1,731 

*140 
1,923 

1,408 
277 

137 
3,240 

2,381 
859 

336 

108 

5,285 

4,337 
469 



479 



411 
282 

271 
266 

246 
91 



(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

77 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

75 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

159 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



165 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(MA) 

(NA) 

365 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



392 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

2,710 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

430 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



4,421 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



9,987 
9,182 

292 

1,340 
2,411 

1,149 
1,262 

3,201 

2,936 
212 

5,041 

4,471 
5,911 

5,669 

76 

8,054 

6,409 

260 

5,262 

3,485 

1,502 

16,310 
15,791 

14,812 

-^314 
16,638 

15,011 
3,298 

2,881 
25,545 

22,820 
2,725 

1,053 

251 

15,524 

7,384 
1,191 

6,949 

2,745 
1,720 

819 
1,496 

.1,168 
186 



(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

119 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

182 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
^105 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

631 

(NA) 
(NA) 

^190 

(NA) 
^174 

(NA) 
(NA) 
*176 

(NA) 
(NA) 
^196 

97 

99 

^692 
(NA) 

548 

(NA) 
'316 

316 

'51 

(NA) 
'917 

917 
(NA) 

'74 

(NA) 

'907 

784 
(NA) 



123 



39 
(NA) 

48 
26 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

1,296 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



2,154 

(NA) 
(NA) 

461 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



13-12 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 3— General Statistics by Selected Industry Groups, for Counties: 1958 and 1954-Continued 

(For explanation of column oaptlona see Introduction) 



Ind. 
code 



County and industry group 



1958 



Establishments, 
number^ 



With 20 

or more 

eiqjloy- 

ees 



All employees 



Number 



Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 



Production and 
development workers 



Number 



Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 



Wages 
($1,000) 



Value 

added in 

mining 



($1,000) 



Cost of 
supplies, 
etc. and 
purchased 
machinery 
Installed 

($1,000) 



Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts 

($1,000) 



Capital 

ex- 
pendi- 
tures 



($1,000) 



195^^ 



All 
em- 
ploy- 
ees, 
nuniber 



Value 

added 

in 

($1,000) 



131 

13 

131 

131 
13 
131 
13 



131 

U 
142 

144 

13 

131 

138 



COUNTIES— Continued 

Stafford 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Stanton 

Stevens 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Sumner 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Thomas 

Trego 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Wabaunsee 

Wilson: 

Including operations in 

manufactures 

Mineral industries only 

Woodson 

'Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Vfyandotte (mineral industries 
only), total 

Crushed and broken stone 

(mineral industries only) . . 
Sand and gravel 

Undistributed, total 

Crude petroleum and 
natural gas 

Oil and gas field services 



174 

97 
18 
28 

17 
105 

68 

6 

208 

177 
4 

33 
30 

58 
41 

11 

3 
8 

260 

100 
160 



356 

233 
21 
87 

48 

187 

125 

7 

108 

65 



*127 
99 

92 
79 

189 

^0115 
74 

1,514 

700 
814 



1,612 

1,101 

93 

389 

227 
854 

591 

30 

455 

307 
35 



*526 
405 

425 
373 

2,385 

i°l,951 
434 

6,975 

3,309 
3,666 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

125 

69 
56 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

306 

174 
132 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

784 

448 
336 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

1,767 

1,011 
756 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

928 

535 
393 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



16,742 

14,740 

862 

8,159 

7,968 

7,110 

6,339 

128 

5,093 

4,724 
835 

*2,156 
1,471 

1,994 
1,758 

2,556 

1,546 
1,010 

30,490 

20,754 
9,736 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(HA) 

139 

139 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



"338 

(NA) 

(NA) 

653 

(NA) 
«U8 

(NA) 

(NA) 

654 

(NA) 
629 



(NA) 
*82 

*104 
104 

213 

1^118 
95 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 

2,465 

^^1,206 
1,259 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 



D Withheld to avoid disclosing data for individual companies. 

NA Not available. 

•"■Excludes data for sand and gravel mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

^Conpanies operating oil and gas field properties were permitted to make only one report for all oil and gas field operations in each State. Com- 
panies engaged only in performing oil and gas field services were permitted to make only one report for all States; these reports were classified on 
the basis of the principal state in which the service was performed. For 1958, such reports contained enployment on March 15 and selected other data 
by State and county. For such operations, the State total figures shown for number of establishments represent the number of reports received which 
were classified in the State and those shown for number of establishments in a county represent the number of reports that indicated any operations in 
the specified county. All county statistics shown which were not reported separately were obtained by allocating the totals reported for each coujiany 
on the basis of the reported county data. 

•'Excludes figures for cirushed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments. 

*See table 2A, footnote 3. 

'For Clashed and broken stone, sand and gravel, clay, and gypsum mining operations in manufacturing establishments, excludes the cost of purchased 
machinery installed. 

^Excludes data for the Oil and Gas Field Ser^vices Indus-tries. 

''Represents mineral industries only. 

^Includes data for operations in manufacturing establishments. 

'includes data for 2 establishments in Major Group 14, Nonmetallic Minerals Mining. 

■'■"includes data for separately reported central offices and related facilities in the Oil and Gas Extraction Industries. 

^■"■Includes data for the Dimension Stone Indiistry. 



KANSAS 



13-13 



Tabic 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958 



101 Iron ores 

102 Copper ores 

103 Lead and zinc ores 

104 Gold and silver ores 

105 Bauxite 

106 Ferroalloy ores 

108 Metal mining services 

109 Miscellaneous metal ores 
120 Bituminous coal 



12C Coal mining services 

131 Crude petroleum and natural gas 

132 Natural gas liquids 

138 Oil and gas field services 

141 Dimension stone 

141M Dimension stone in manufactures 

142 Crushed and broken stone 

142M Crushed and broken stone in manufactures 
14A Sand and gravel 



144M Sand and gravel in manufactures 

145 Clay and related mineraJs 

145M Clay and related minerals in manufactures 

147 Chemical and fertilizer mlnerala 

148 Nonmetallic minerals services 

149 Miscellaneous minerals, n.e.c. 
149M Miscellaneous minerals n.e.c, in 

manufactures 



(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


12Cl 


1311 


132 


138^ 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


148^ 


149 


149 
M 


Kansas , total 


1,632 

157 
819 
235 

227 

148 

32 

12 

1 
1 

41 
2 

28 

1 

1 
1 

81 
6 

363 
20 

1 

7 

209 
S 

1 

12 

63 
3 

22 

1 

4 
22 

6 

1 

4 
20 


1,599 

157 
804 
227 

222 

143 

32 

12 

1 
1 

35 
2 

28 

1 

1 
1 

80 
6 

361 
20 

1 

5 

209 
8 

1 

12 

63 
3 

21 

1 

4 
22 

6 

1 

3 
20 


33 

15 
8 

5 
5 






16 
5 
6 

4 

1 










1 


20 
6 
7 
2 

2 
2 

1 




905 

104 

516 

99 

81 
70 
21 
12 

1 

1 

24 

1 

13 

1 


15 

"2 

6 

7 


475 
24 

204 
91 

108 

39 

9 


2 
2 


5 

1 
2 

2 


58 

2 

15 

10 

14 
17 


8 

"i 

3 

2 
2 


96 
13 

51 
16 

10 
6 


5 


4 


13 


4 




3 

1 
2 


? 


No employees 

1-4 en5)loyees 

5-9 enjjloyees 

10-19 enqjloyees . . . 
20-''.9 enqjloyees . . . 
50-99 employees . . . 
100-249 enployees. 

250-499 employees. 
500-999 en^ployees. 

COUNTIES 

Allen: 

0-19 enqjloyees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Anderson: 

0-19 eii?)loyees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Atchison: 

0-19 engjloyees.... 
20-99 employees... 

Barber: 

0-19 engjloyees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Barton: 

0-19 einployees .... 
20-99 engjloyees . . . 
100-249 employees. 

Bourbon: 

0-19 employees .... 

Butler: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 
20-99 einployees . . . 
100-249 employees. 

Chase: 

0-19 enjjloyees.... 

Chautauqua: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 

Cherokee: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Cheyenne: 

0-19 employees .... 

Clark: 

0-19 employees .... 

Clay: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Cloud: 

0-19 employees.... 

Coffey: 

0-19 employees .... 




















1 


1 
2 

1 
1 


"3 


12 

1 


2 


























? 












1 




1 
1 


































































































































































6 
























11 






1 
2 


2 








4 






















































... 


13 


... 


... 






















































































1 
1 


... 


































































1 






















46 
2 

249 

13 

1 

1 

172 

4 

1 

9 

50 
3 


1 


32 

4 

107 
6 






1 














1 












































2 






























4 

1 


• • ■ 




2 


1 


















































































2 


















2 


... 


... 


1 

37 
4 


... 


1 


1 


1 




































































































































































... 


3 
12 
















































• • . 


• . • 


1 


























































1 


... 


... 


16 












3 
1 


... 










2 


... 


... 


. . . 


. t . 


1 


. • > 


* . • 














































13 


... 


3 
9 
2 










1 


















































































• • ■ 


• ■ ■ 


1 


... 


3 
1 

1 




















































1 






















1 
13 










1 
1 


... 


... 


... 


1 


... 


... 


... 




















1 


... 


... 


5 


... 


... 









































^See table 3, footnote 2. 



13-14 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties; 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 





All mineral operations 


Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


State, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


12C^ 


1311 


132 


138^ 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


14S1 


149 


149 

M 


COUNTIES— Continued 

Comanche: 

0-19 employees .... 

Crowley: 

0-19 einployees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Crawford: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Decatur: 

0-19 employees.... 

Diclserson: 

0-19 employees .... 

Doniphan: 

0-19 employees.... 

Douglas : 

0-19 employees .... 

Edwards : 

0-19 employees .... 

Elk: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Ellis: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Ellsworth: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Finney: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Ford: 

0-19 employees .... 

FranU-in: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Geary: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Gove: 

0-19 employees .... 

Graham: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Grant: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Gray: 

0-19 employees .... 

Greeley: 

0-19 employees .... 

Greenwood: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-19 employees . . . 


7 

130 
7 

22 
3 

13 

14 

2 

3 

31 

27 

1 

37-4 
9 

72 
2 

43 
2 

8 

23 
2 

6 
- 1 

7 

176 
4 

23 
4 

4 

1 

129 
9 


7 

129 

6 

22 
3 

13 

14 

2 

3 
31 

27 

1 

374 
9 

72 
2 

43 
2 

8 

23 
2 

5 

1 

7 

176 
4 

23 
4 

4 

1 

129 
9 




















5 
2 


... 


2 

86 
2 

11 


i 


5 

40 
3 

4 


























1 
1 


















1 


1 
1 


... 


•• 


1 
1 






























































... 


2 


... 


■ • • 


... 


... 
























... 


1 
























9 

5 


... 


4 
4 








































... 


... 


3 
2 

1 
1 


... 


2 


































































12 
22 


... 


2 

17 

5 


... 






































1 






































































1 






































284 
6 

45 
1 

27 

2 

11 


... 


89 
3 

26 






1 


















































































1 
















































1 


























1 


14 

1 

2 
10 










1 
1 

4 

1 

2 












































































































• • • 


... 


1 
1 

1 
1 


... 




































1 












1 


















... 


... 


2 


• • • 


1 




















































2 

108 
3 

17 
1 

1 

102 
7 


1 
2 


5 

68 

1 

5 
1 

2 

1 

27 
2 
























































































































































































































1 


































































































... 





















































































I 



^See table 3, footnote2. 



KANSAS 



13-15 



Tabic 4— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All mineral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied In 

mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 



In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles )- 



101 



102 



103 



104 



105 



106 



108- 



109 



120 



12C^ 



131' 



132 



138^ 



141 



142 



144 



145 



147 



lAS^ 



149 



149 
M 



COUNTIES— Continued 

Hamilton: 

0-19 enployees.... 

Harper: 

0-19 eii5>loyees.... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Harvey: 

0-19 en^jloyees.... 

Haskell: 

0-19 eii5)loy ees . . . . 

Hodgeman: 

0-19 enyloy ees .... 

Jackson: 

0-19 PTnployees .... 

Jefferson: 

20-99 enployees . . . 

Johnson: 

0-19 en^iloyees .... 

Keamy: 

0-19 eJi5)loyee3 . . . . 

Kingman: 

0-19 employees .... 

Kiowa: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 enjiloyees . . . 

Labette: 

0-19 employees .... 

Lane: 

0-19 employees .... 

Leavenworth: 

0-19 engjloyees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Lincoln: 

0-19 en^iloyees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Linn: 

0-19 employees .... 

Logan: 

0-19 employees .... 

Lyon: 

0-19 employees .... 

Mcpherson: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Marlon: 

0-19 en^iloyees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Marshall: 

0-19 employees .... 

Meade: 

0-19 employees.... 



47 
31 
13 



25 
82 



39 

1 



12 



13 



13 



153 

1 



92 

4 



45 



47 



31 



13 



25 



82 



12 



13 



13 



152 
1 



45 



29 



24 



22 



43 



99 



25 



37 



17 



20 



^See table 3, footnote 2. 



13-16 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 4.-Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 







(Counties and 3 


ize 


classes 


in which 


no 


mineral operations were 


reported 


are 


omitted 


) 


















All mineral operations 


Number of operations by Industry group (See headnote for titles) — 


state, county, and 
size class 


Total 


Classi- 
fied in 
mineral 
indus- 
tries 1 


In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 


101 


102 


103 


104 


105 


106 


108^ 


109 


120 


120^ 


131 1 


132 


138^ 


141 


141 
M 


142 


142 
M 


144 


144 
M 


145 


145 
M 


147 


145^ 


149 


149 
M 


COUNTIES— Continued 

Miami: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Mitchell: 

0-19 employees. ... 

Montgomery: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees... 

Morris: 

0-19 employees .... 


27 

1 

1 

65 
3 

17 

31 

5 

55 

1 

40 

1 

27 

4 

1 

9 

125 

34 

1 

3 

69 

3 

7 

79 
2 

159 
3 

4 

1 

122 
3 

46 


27 

1 

1 

62 
3 

17 

31 

5 

52 

1 

40 

1 

27 

4 
1 

9 

124 

34 

1 

3 

69 
3 

7 

79 
2 

159 
3 

3 

122 
3 

46 




















3 


... 


19 




8 
















































1 


1 




































50 

1 

6 

18 

1 

20 

1 

18 
14 


... 


12 
2 

6 
13 

2 
30 


1 


... 


















3 


















... 


... 


... 


2 


... 


... 


... 








































... 


... 


4 


... 


1 
















Morton: 

0-19 employees .... 


































Nemaha: 

0-19 employees .... 




















... 


... 


1 
1 


2 


1 
1 
















Neosho: 

0-19 employees . . . . 
20-99 einployees . . . 

Ness: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Norton: 

0-19 employees .... 

Osage: 

0-19 employees .... 


3 


















- • • 


• • • 


1 


• « • 


• • • 










































... 


22 

1 

11 






























































































1 












1 


























1 
1 


... 














20-99 employees... 

Osborne: 

0-19 employees .... 

Pawnee: 

0-19 employees .... 

Phillips: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Pottawatomie: 

0-19 employees.... 

Pratt: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Rawlins: 

0-19 employees.... 

Reno: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Rice: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-19 employees . . . 

Riley: 

0-19 employees.... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Rooks: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Rush: 

0-19 employees .... 
































































5 
97 

22 

1 

35 

1 

1 
41 

96 
3 

1 


... 


4 
26 
11 






















1 


























1 


1 






































1 


■ • ■ 


• • • 


> • • 


... 


















































"i 


1 

32 
2 

5 

33 


... 


... 


1 


... 


1 
2 


















































































































1 

5 
























































































1 
1 


























57 




• • • 


1 


• > ■ 


4 


... 


... 


























1 
1 


















... 


1 










1 


1 
































1 


































70 
2 

27 


1 


51 

1 

18 




1 













































































































































^See table 3, footnote 2. 



KANSAS 



13-17 



Tabic 4.— Distribution of Mineral Operations by Employment Size Class and by Industry Group, 

for Counties: 1958— Continued 

(Counties and size classes in which no mineral operations were reported are omitted) 



State, county, and 
size class 



All ndneral operations 



Total 



Classi- 
fied In 
mineral 
indus- 
tries^ 



In- 
cluded 

in 
manu- 
fac- 
tures 



Number of operations by industry group (See headnote for titles) — 



101 



102 



103 



io<; 



105 



106 



108^ 



109 



120 



120^ 



131' 



132 



138' 



Wl 



1A2 



1-W 



U5 



147 



148^ 



149 



149 
M 



COUNTIES— Continued 

Russell: 

0-19 enjjloyees .... 
20-99 engjloyees... 

Saline: 

0-19 employees .... 

Scott: 

0-19 engjloyees.... 

Sedgwick: 

0-19 en^jloyees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 

Seward: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees... 

Shawnee: 

0-19 enjjloyees .... 

Sheridan: 

0-19 employees .... 

Sherman: 

0-19 employees .... 

Stafford: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 enjiloyees . . . 

Stanton: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Stevens: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 
20-99 employees ... 

Sumner: 

0-19 en5)loyees. . .. 

Thomas: 

0-19 employees .... 

Trego: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 enjiloyees. . . 

Wabaunsee: 

0-19 employees .... 

Wallace: 

0-19 employees .... 

Washington: 

0-19 enployees .... 

Wichita: 

0-19 employees .... 

Wilson: 

0-19 eii5)loyees .... 
20-99 en^iloyees . . . 

Woodson: 

0-19 employees .... 

Wyandotte: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 en5)loyees . . . 

Undistributed: 

0-19 employees .... 
20-99 employees . . . 



231 
9 



37 



136 

15 



12 



17 



171 
3 



18 



105 



205 
3 



58 



256 
4 



231 
9 



37 



136 

14 



11 



171 
3 



18 



105 



205 
3 



58 



256 
4 



160 



23 



30 



12 



10 



175 
2 



16 



41 



13 



45 



36 



30 



11 



16 



16 



■^See table 3, footnote 2. 



KENTUCKY 

14-1 



14-2 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES — AREA STATISTICS 



Employment in Mining by County 

KENTUCKY 



1958 



RANK AMONG STATES 
EMPLOYMENT - 6 
VALUE OF SHIPMENTS - 10 



EMPLOYMENT 




8000- 


12000 


- 


4000- 


7999 


y^ 


2000- 


3999 — ^ 


/^ 


1000- 


1999 — ~ 




500- 


999 




200- 


499 — 




25- 


199 — ' 






U. S. DEPAIITMB4T OF COAAMHCE 
MMEAU OF THE CENSUS 



Employment in Mining 

including iViining in iVianufactures: 1902 -1958 
KENTUCKY 



60 



55 40 
9 



20 



OIL AND GAS EXTRACTION 

<Not ovoilable for 1929) 

NONMETALLIC MINERALS MINING 



COAL MINING 



/9a? 



DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE 



1909 




1919 1929 

CENSUS YEAR 



1939 



195^ 1958 



BUREAU OF THE CENSUS 



MINING IN KENTUCKY 

Employment For Industry Group By County: 1958 



14-3 



Metal Mining 



NO METAL MINING PRODUCTION 
OR DEVELOPMENT OPERATIONS 
WERE REPORTED 




Oil and Gas Extraction 



General Extent of Oil and Gas Fields 



Coal Mining 




General Extent of Coal Fields 




Nonmetallic Minerals Mining 





U. 5u OffAITMa^T Of COMMERCE 



100 1.000 2.S00 5,000 7.500 

Number of Employees 



ftUREAU OF THE C^SUS 



14-4 



MINERAL INDUSTRIES-AREA STATISTICS 



Table 1— General Statistics for Mineral Operations: 1958 and Earlier Years 

(For explanation of column captions see Introduction. For more detailed historical statistics for this dtate, see table 1 of the corresponding 
chapter of the 1954 Census of Mineral Industries, Vol. II. For all years prior to 1939, excludes contract service operations) 





Establish- 
ments, 
number 






Production 


and 


Value 

added 

in 

mining 

($1,000) 


Selected expenses ($1,000) 


Value of 
ship- 
ments 
and re- 
ceipts ■'■ 

($1,000) 


Capi- 
tal 
ex- 
pendi- 
tures 

($1,000) 


Energy 


used 






development workers 


Supplies, 
purchases 
for re- 
sale, and 
purchased 
fuels and 

elec- 
tricity 


Miner- 
als 
re- 
ceived 

for 
prepa- 
ration 


Con- 
tract 
work 


Pur- 
chased 
machio- 

ery 

in- 
stalled 


equivalent ) 


Kind of operation 
and year 


To- 
tal 


20 

or 
more 
em- 
ploy- 
ees 


Number 


Pay- 
roll 

($1,000) 


Number 


Man- 
hours 

(1,000) 


Wages 
($1,000) 


Total 

(mil- 
lion) 


Per 
pro- 
duc- 
tion 
worker 

(1,000) 


Mineral industries 
only: 

1958 

195-4 


2,111 
1,816 

2,123 

1,828 

'743 

949 

464 

6749 

1,488 

1,325 

^616 

554 

745 

377 

'633 


334 
337 

334 
337 

(NA) 

(MA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

284 
285 
(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


36,098 
38,895 

36,134 
38,917 
53,839 

47,591 
19,349 
11,581 

31,230 
34,522 
52,046 
61,045 

44,994 
19,065 
11,284 


149,465 
139,313 

149,586 

139,370 

56,971 

56,955 

8,810 
5,909 

132,458 

126,273 

55,153 

69,389 

53,459 
8,632 
5,684 


32,099 
35,820 

32,135 
35,842 
51,452 

43,631 

18,316 

^^0,687 

27,800 
31,794 
49,825 
57,831 

41,500 
18,089 
"30,525 


53,115 
59,659 

53,187 
59,702 
73,891 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

45,265 

52,475 

71,492 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


"^129, 032 
124,149 

^^12^153 

124,206 

52,338 

49,622 
7,835 
5,220 

114,843 

112,536 

50,876 

62,799 

46,963 
7,710 
5,097 


320,296 
272,103 

321,348 

272,203 

77,169 

76,852 

10, 370 

6,846 

253,003 

212,468 

68,326 

87,676 

58,127 
9,752 

7,030 


88,587 
66,057 

^88,650 

="66,162 

13,553 

18,261 
1,544 
1,276 

^73,958 

355,099 

12,683 

16,102 

13,962 

1,366 

943 


75,908 
^24,775 

75,908 
^24,775 

(NA) 

841 
(NA) 

63,274 
23,286 

(NA) 
(NA) 

(NA) 


24,617 
14,905 

^24,617 

^14,905 

1,084 

3,333 

186 
411 

^8,793 

^4,270 

199 

72 

3,068 
90 
21 


28,063 
18,756 

"28,063 
■^18, 756 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

''22,244 
"12,152 

(NA) 
3,031 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


492,520 
365,877 

493,635 
366,082 

91,806 

98,487 

12,100 

8,533 

397,972 

293,586 

81,208 

103,850 

75,157 

11,208 

7,994 


44,951 
30,719 

"44,951 
"30,719 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 

"23,300 

"13,689 

(NA) 

(NA) 

(NA) 
(NA) 
(NA) 


'''*,1'^3 
3,514 

■^"4,143 

"3,514 

2,322 

'5,885 

(NA) 
(NA) 

^■"2,066 

"1,486 

1,964 

4,382 

95,512 

(NA) 
(NA) 


r 
129 
98 


I